Free Online JC PURE INSPIRATION for free birds 🐦 🦢 🦅 to grow fruits 🍍 🍊 🥑 🥭 🍇 🍌 🍎 🍉 🍒 🍑 🥝 vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 🥬 🥔 🍆 🥜 🪴 🌱 🎃 🫑 🍅🍜 🧅 🍄 🍝 🥗 🥒 🌽 🍏 🫑 🌳 🍓 🍊 🥥 🌵 🍈 🌰 🇧🇧 🫐 🍅 🍐 🫒 Youniversity
Kushinara NIBBĀNA Bhumi Pagoda White Home, Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru, Prabuddha Bharat International.
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
January 2022
M T W T F S S
« Dec   Feb »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  
01/18/22
𝓛𝓔𝓢𝓢𝓞𝓝 4318 Wed 19 Jan 2022 Do Good Purify Mind said the Awakened One ‘Having known the cessation of the faculty of equanimity concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’ Having completely gone beyond the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,having entered the cessation of perception & feeling,dwells therein. All men&women start growing vegetables&fruit bearing dwarf plants in pots to overcome Hunger the greatest ill,the greatest suffering-conditionedness, said Awakened One knowing this reality at it is: Ultimate Happiness supreme that is the end of suffering. Earth the Spring of Nector (Amudha Surabhi,air,water,fire&space Combine to make this food. Numberless sentient and non sentient beings give their life & labor that we may eat. May we be nourished that we may nourish life! “Even fear is frightened by the bodhisattva’s fearlessness.” Then Awakened Universe is created.
Filed under: General, Theravada Tipitaka , Plant raw Vegan Broccoli, peppers, cucumbers, carrots
Posted by: site admin @ 5:32 am


𝓛𝓔𝓢𝓢𝓞𝓝 4318 Wed 19 Jan 2022

Do Good Purify Mind said the Awakened One

‘Having known the cessation of the faculty of equanimity
concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’ Having completely gone
beyond the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,having entered the cessation of perception & feeling,dwells
therein.

All men&women
start growing vegetables&fruit bearing dwarf plants in pots to
overcome Hunger the greatest ill,the greatest suffering-conditionedness,
said Awakened One knowing this reality at it is:
Ultimate Happiness supreme that is the end of suffering.
Earth the Spring of Nector (Amudha Surabhi,air,water,fire&space
Combine to make this food.
Numberless sentient and non sentient beings give their life & labor that we may eat.
May we be nourished that we may nourish life!

“Even fear is frightened by the bodhisattva’s fearlessness.”

Then Awakened Universe is created.


English

‘Having known the cessation of the faculty of equanimity concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’
Having completely gone beyond the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,having entered the cessation of perception & feeling,dwells therein.
——————
The First Jhana: First Jhana Buddhism / First Jhana Walkthrough

The Self-Improvement Hub

The first Jhana is
one of eight total mental states in Buddhism. Jhana meditation is the
path that leads to entering the first Jhana. In this video, I illustrate
what it takes to enter the first Jhana. The
first Jhana is a state of mind that is characterized by a very high
level of concentration. It is very hard to achieve, but very worthwhile
to get there.
You can only enter
the first Jhana, if you are secluded from sensual pleasures and from
amoral thoughts and the like. Further, you should be alone in a place
where there is little sound, with your eyes closed.
There will never be perfect conditions, but you can create
circumstances, in which your senses do not distract you much. You should
sit in a way that allows you not to move the slightest for at least an
hour. You should have eaten a small meal 1 hour before
so you are not hungry and thirsty. You should haven’t been in the
bathroom directly before. ANYTHING that creates strong aversion or
attraction has to be quenched for this to work properly.

You will notice that
you entered the first Jhana by the described rupture and pleasure, as
those accompany the first Jhana. Any thoughts and feeling etc. that
still arise there, and they do sometimes arise
during Jhana, are felt as an affliction and you automatically make an
effort to let them go.

SN 48.40 (S v 213)
Uppaṭipāṭika Sutta
— In progressive order —
[ud+paṭipāṭika]

This sutta draws an
interesting parallel between the cessation of the feeling faculties and
the progressive attainments of jhānas.

There are, bhikkhus,
these five faculties. Which five? The faculty of pain, the faculty of
mental unpleasantness, the faculty of pleasure, the faculty of mental
pleasantness, the faculty of equanimity.

Here, bhikkhus, in a
bhikkhu dwelling heedful, ardent and vigorous arises the faculty of
pain. He understands thus: ‘This faculty of pain has arisen in me, and
it is with a cause, with an origin, with a
condition, with a ground. That the faculty of pain would arise without a
cause, without an origin, without a condition, without a ground: that
is impossible.’ He understands the faculty of pain, he understands the
arising of the faculty of pain, he understands
the cessation of the faculty of pain, and he also understands where the
arisen faculty of pain ceases totally.

And where does the
arisen faculty of pain cease totally? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu,
detached from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having
entered in the first jhāna, remains therein, with thoughts,
with mental associations, exaltation and well-being engendered by
detachment, and it is here that the faculty of pain ceases totally. It
is said of this, bhikkhus, ‘a bhikkhu having known the cessation of the
faculty of pain concentrates the mind with that
as an aim.’{1}

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, in a bhikkhu dwelling heedful, ardent and vigorous arises the
faculty of mental unpleasantness. He understands thus: ‘This faculty of
mental unpleasantness has arisen in me, and it
is with a cause, with an origin, with a condition, with a ground. That
the faculty of mental unpleasantness would arise without a cause,
without an origin, without a condition, without a ground: that is
impossible.’ He understands the faculty of mental unpleasantness,
he understands the arising of the faculty of mental unpleasantness, he
understands the cessation of the faculty of mental unpleasantness, and
he also understands where the arisen faculty of mental unpleasantness
ceases totally.

And where does the
arisen faculty of mental unpleasantness cease totally? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, with the stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having
entered in the second jhāna, he remains
therein with inner tanquilization, unification of the mind, without
thoughts nor mental associations, with exaltation and well-being
engendered by concentration, and it is here that the faculty of mental
unpleasantness ceases totally.{2} It is said of this,
bhikkhus, ‘a bhikkhu having known the cessation of the faculty of mental
unpleasantness concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, in a bhikkhu dwelling heedful, ardent and vigorous arises the
faculty of pleasure. He understands thus: ‘This faculty of pleasure has
arisen in me, and it is with a cause, with an
origin, with a condition, with a ground. That the faculty of pleasure
would arise without a cause, without an origin, without a condition,
without a ground: that is impossible.’ He understands the faculty of
pleasure, he understands the arising of the faculty
of pleasure, he understands the cessation of the faculty of pleasure,
and he also understands where the arisen faculty of pleasure ceases
totally.

And where does the
arisen faculty of pleasure cease totally? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu,
with the fading away of exaltation, he remains equanimous, mindful and
endowed with thorough understanding, and he
feels in the body the well-being that the noble ones describe: ‘one who
is equanimous and mindful abides in well-being’, having entered in the
third jhāna, he remains therein, and it is here that the faculty of
pleasure ceases totally. It is said of this,
bhikkhus, ‘a bhikkhu having known the cessation of the faculty of
pleasure concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, in a bhikkhu dwelling heedful, ardent and vigorous arises the
faculty of mental pleasantness. He understands thus: ‘This faculty of
mental pleasantness has arisen in me, and it is
with a cause, with an origin, with a condition, with a ground. That the
faculty of mental pleasantness would arise without a cause, without an
origin, without a condition, without a ground: that is impossible.’ He
understands the faculty of mental pleasantness,
he understands the arising of the faculty of mental pleasantness, he
understands the cessation of the faculty of mental pleasantness, and he
also understands where the arisen faculty of mental pleasantness ceases
totally.

And where does the
arisen faculty of mental pleasantness cease totally? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, gladness
and affliction having previously disappeared,
having entered in the fourth jhāna, which is without unpleasantness nor
pleasantness and is purified by mindfulness due to equanimity, he
remains therein, and it is here that the faculty of mental pleasantness
ceases totally. It is said of this, bhikkhus,
‘a bhikkhu having known the cessation of the faculty of mental
pleasantness concentrates the mind with that as an aim.’

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, in a bhikkhu dwelling heedful, ardent and vigorous arises the
faculty of equanimity. He understands thus: ‘This faculty of equanimity
has arisen in me, and it is with a cause, with
an origin, with a condition, with a ground. That the faculty of
equanimity would arise without a cause, without an origin, without a
condition, without a ground: that is impossible.’ He understands the
faculty of equanimity, he understands the arising of the
faculty of equanimity, he understands the cessation of the faculty of
equanimity, and he also understands where the arisen faculty of
equanimity ceases totally.

And where does the
arisen faculty of equanimity cease totally? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu,
having completely gone beyond the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,
having entered the cessation of
perception and feeling, dwells therein, and it is here that the faculty
of equanimity ceases totally. It is said of this, bhikkhus, ‘a bhikkhu
having known the cessation of the faculty of equanimity concentrates the
mind with that as an aim.’


Tree >> Sutta Piṭaka >> Saṃyutta Nikāya >> Indriya Saṃyutta

Pāḷi

Pañcimāni,
bhikkhave, indriyāni. Katamāni pañ·ca? Dukkh·indriyaṃ,
domanass·indriyaṃ, sukh·indriyaṃ, somanass·indriyaṃ, upekkh·indriyaṃ.
Idha, bhikkhave,
bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato uppajjati
dukkh·indriyaṃ. So evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ dukkh·indriyaṃ,
tañ·ca kho sa·nimittaṃ sa·nidānaṃ sa·saṅkhāraṃ sa·p·paccayaṃ.
Tañ·ca a·nimittaṃ a·nidānaṃ a·saṅkhāraṃ a·p·paccayaṃ dukkh·indriyaṃ
uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. So dukkh·indriyañ·ca pajānāti,
dukkh·indriya-samudayañ·ca pajānāti, dukkh·indriya-nirodhañ·ca pajānāti,
yattha c·uppannaṃ dukkh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati
tañ·ca pajānāti.
Kattha c·uppannaṃ
dukkh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vivicc·eva kāmehi vivicca a·kusalehi dhammehi sa·vitakkaṃ sa·vicāraṃ
viveka·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
ettha c·uppannaṃ dukkh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. Ayaṃ vuccati,
bhikkhave, ‘bhikkhu aññāsi dukkh·indriyassa nirodhaṃ, tad·atthāya cittaṃ
upasaṃharati’.
Idha pana,
bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato
uppajjati domanass·indriyaṃ. So evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ
domanass·indriyaṃ, tañ·ca kho sa·nimittaṃ sa·nidānaṃ sa·saṅkhāraṃ
sa·p·paccayaṃ. Tañ·ca a·nimittaṃ a·nidānaṃ a·saṅkhāraṃ a·p·paccayaṃ
domanass·indriyaṃ uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. So
domanass·indriyañ·ca pajānāti, domanass·indriya-samudayañ·ca pajānāti,
domanass·indriya-nirodhañ·ca pajānāti, yattha c·uppannaṃ
domanass·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati tañ·ca pajānāti.
Kattha c·uppannaṃ
domanass·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
a·vitakkaṃ a·vicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ
jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, ettha c·uppannaṃ domanass·indriyaṃ
aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. Ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, ‘bhikkhu aññāsi
domanass·indriyassa nirodhaṃ, tad·atthāya cittaṃ upasaṃharati’.
Idha pana,
bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato
uppajjati sukh·indriyaṃ. So evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ
sukh·indriyaṃ, tañ·ca kho sa·nimittaṃ sa·nidānaṃ sa·saṅkhāraṃ
sa·p·paccayaṃ.
Tañ·ca a·nimittaṃ a·nidānaṃ a·saṅkhāraṃ a·p·paccayaṃ sukh·indriyaṃ
uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. So sukh·indriyañ·ca pajānāti,
sukh·indriya-samudayañ·ca pajānāti, sukh·indriya-nirodhañ·ca pajānāti,
yattha c·uppannaṃ sukh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati
tañ·ca pajānāti.
Kattha c·uppannaṃ
sukh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu pītiyā ca
virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca sampajāno, sukhañ·ca kāyena
paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako
satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, ettha
c·uppannaṃ sukh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. Ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave,
‘bhikkhu aññāsi sukh·indriyassa nirodhaṃ, tad·atthāya cittaṃ
upasaṃharati’.
Idha pana,
bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato
uppajjati somanass·indriyaṃ. So evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ
somanass·indriyaṃ, tañ·ca kho sa·nimittaṃ sa·nidānaṃ sa·saṅkhāraṃ
sa·p·paccayaṃ. Tañ·ca a·nimittaṃ a·nidānaṃ a·saṅkhāraṃ a·p·paccayaṃ
somanass·indriyaṃ uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. So
somanass·indriyañ·ca pajānāti, somanass·indriya-samudayañ·ca pajānāti,
somanass·indriya-nirodhañ·ca pajānāti, yattha c·uppannaṃ
somanass·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati tañ·ca pajānāti.
Kattha c·uppannaṃ
somanass·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubb·eva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā a·dukkham·a·sukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ
catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, ettha c·uppannaṃ
somanass·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. Ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave,
‘bhikkhu aññāsi somanass·indriyassa nirodhaṃ, tad·atthāya cittaṃ
upasaṃharati’.
Idha pana,
bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato
uppajjati upekkh·indriyaṃ. So evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ
upekkh·indriyaṃ, tañ·ca kho sa·nimittaṃ sa·nidānaṃ sa·saṅkhāraṃ
sa·p·paccayaṃ. Tañ·ca a·nimittaṃ a·nidānaṃ a·saṅkhāraṃ a·p·paccayaṃ
upekkh·indriyaṃ uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. So
upekkh·indriyañ·ca pajānāti, upekkh·indriya-samudayañ·ca pajānāti,
upekkh·indriya-nirodhañ·ca pajānāti, yattha c·uppannaṃ upekkh·indriyaṃ
aparisesaṃ nirujjhati tañ·ca pajānāti.
Kattha c·uppannaṃ
upekkh·indriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sabbaso
neva·saññā·n·āsaññ·āyatanaṃ samatikkamma saññā·vedayita·nirodhaṃ
upasampajja viharati, ettha c·uppannaṃ upekkh·indriyaṃ
aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. Ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, ‘bhikkhu aññāsi
upekkh·indriyassa nirodhaṃ, tad·atthāya cittaṃ upasaṃharatī’ti.

The
First Jhana: First Jhana Buddhism / First Jhana Walkthrough
The
first Jhana is one of eight total mental states in Buddhism. Jhana
meditation is the path that leads to entering the first Jhana. In this
video, I illust…

अच्छा शुद्ध करें मन ने कहा कि जागृत एक
एसएन 48.40 (एस वी 213)
उप्पतापिका सुट्टा
- प्रगतिशील क्रम में -
[ud + paṭipāṭika]
‘समतुल्यता के संकाय के समापन के बाद यह एक उद्देश्य के रूप में दिमाग को ध्यान में रखता है।’
न तो धारणा-न तो-धारणा-नॉन-गैर-धारणा के क्षेत्र से परे
पूरी तरह से चला गया, धारणा और भावना की समाप्ति में प्रवेश करने के बाद,
उसमें रहने वाले हैं।
——————
और समतलता के Arisen संकाय पूरी तरह से कैसे समाप्त होता
है? यहां, भिक्खू, भिक्खु, न तो-धारणा-न तो-न-गैर-धारणा के क्षेत्र से परे
हो गए, धारणा और भावना के समाप्ति में प्रवेश करने के बाद, उसमें निवास
किया गया, और यह यहां है कि समताता का संकाय पूरी
तरह से समाप्त हो जाता है। यह कहा जाता है, भिक्खस, ‘एक भिक्कू को समझा
जाता है कि समतलता के संकाय के समापन को एक उद्देश्य के रूप में दिमाग को
ध्यान में रखा गया है।’

youtube.com

बुद्ध
ने समझाया ” कर्म का फल कैसे मिलता है ? ” | story of Buddha
BUDHHA:
THE WAY OF LIVING#budhha #budhhathewayofliving #meditation #meditate #vippasana #karma______________________________________INSTAGRAM:- budhha & medi…


13)
Classical Assamese-ধ্ৰুপদী অসমীয়া

Public

ডু গুড পিউৰিফাই
মাইণ্ডে কৈছিল জাগ্ৰত এছএন 48.40 (এছ বনাম 213) Uppaṭipāṭika চুট্টা —
প্ৰগতিশীল ক্ৰমত - [উদ+paṭipāṭika] ‘সমতা অনুষদ বন্ধ হওয়ার কথা জানার পর
মনটাকে লক্ষ্য হিসেবে মনোনিবেশ করে। ধাৰণা আৰু অনুভৱ
বন্ধ হোৱাত সম্পূৰ্ণৰূপে উপলব্ধি-বা-অ-ধাৰণা ৰ ক্ষেত্ৰৰ বাহিৰলৈ যোৱাৰ
পিছত, ইয়াত বাস কৰে। —————— আৰু সমতাৰ উদ্ভৱ হোৱা
অনুষদসম্পূৰ্ণৰূপে ক’ত বন্ধ হয়? ইয়াত, ভিখখুচ নামৰ এজন ভিখখু, যি কোনো
ধাৰণা-ধাৰণা-বা-ধাৰণা ৰ ক্ষেত্ৰৰ বাহিৰত সম্পূৰ্ণৰূপে অতিক্ৰম
কৰিছে, ধাৰণা আৰু অনুভূতিৰ সমাপ্তিত প্ৰৱেশ কৰিছে, ইয়াতে বাস কৰে, আৰু
ইয়াতেই সমতাৰ অনুষদ সম্পূৰ্ণৰূপে বন্ধ হৈ যায়। এই বিষয়ে কোৱা হয়,
ভিখখুচ, ‘সমতাৰ অনুষদৰ সমাপ্তিৰ বিষয়ে জনা এজন ভিখখুৱে মনক এক লক্ষ্য
হিচাপে মনোনিৱেশ কৰে।’
তথাগত
গৌতম বুদ্ধের জীবনী - প্রথম পর্ব /Tathagata Gautam Buddha’s biography-first episode


17)
Classical Bengali-ক্লাসিক্যাল বাংলা,

Public

ভাল শুদ্ধ মন না জাগ্রত এক
SN 48.40 (এস ভি 213)
আপপুপিপ্যিকা সূতোট
- প্রগতিশীল ক্রম -
[উড + পায়েপ্যিকা]
‘বৈষম্য অনুষদের অবসান জানানো হচ্ছে যে মনের মতো মনকে মনোনিবেশ করে।’
সম্পূর্ণভাবে উপলব্ধি-না-অ-ধারণার গোলকটি অতিক্রম করে চলে গেলে, উপলব্ধি ও অনুভূতির অবসান ঘটায়, সেখানে বাস করে।
——————
এবং যেখানে সমানতা এর
উত্থান অনুষদের সম্পূর্ণভাবে শেষ হয়? এখানে, ভিকখুস, ভিকখু, সম্পূর্ণভাবে
উপলব্ধি-নন-অ-উপলব্ধি অতিক্রম করে চলে গেলে, উপলব্ধি ও অনুভূতির অবসান
ঘটায়, সেখানে বাস করে, এবং এটি এখানে যে সমানতা
অনুষদ সম্পূর্ণরূপে বন্ধ করে দেয়। এটাই বলা হয়, ভিকখুস, ‘ভিক্ষুকু
বৈষম্যের অনুষদের অবসান জানিয়েছিলেন যে, এটি একটি লক্ষ্য হিসাবে মনোনিবেশ
করে।’

উপগুপ্ত
ভান্তের জীবনী|যিনি ৭ বছর বয়সে অর্হৎফল লাভ করেন|
সম্রাট
অশোক বুদ্ধের ধর্মকে ছড়িয়ে দেয়ার ক্ষেত্রে মারের উপদ্রব হতে যিনি রক্ষা করেছেন এবং বুদ্ধের মহাপরিনির্বাণের…


23)
Classical Chinese (Simplified)-古典中文(简体),

做得好的净化心灵说令人敬畏的一个
SN 48.40(S V 213)
uppaṭipāṭikasutta
- 逐步秩序 -
[ud +paṭipāṭika]
“众所周知,平静的戒律将思想集中在宗旨。”
完全超越了既不是感知 - 也不是非感知的领域,进入了感知和感觉的停止,在其中居住。
—————–
arisen大学的大学何处完全停止了? 在这里,一只Bhikkhus,Bhikkhu,完全超越了既不是感知 - 也不是非感知,进入感知和感觉的停止,在其中居住,并且在这里,平等的能力完全停止了。 据说这一点,Bhikkhus,’一个众所周知,一位Bhikkhu,陷入困境的平静的戒烟将思想集中在宗旨。

短短2個字,竟是佛教最強的消業障法,只要念一遍,彌天罪業,即刻消除!
| 禪語



24)
Classical Chinese (Traditional)-古典中文(繁體),

做得好的淨化心靈說令人敬畏的一個
SN 48.40(S V 213)
uppaṭipāṭikasutta
- 逐步秩序 -
[ud +paṭipāṭika]
“眾所周知,平靜的戒律將思想集中在宗旨。”
完全超越了既不是感知 - 也不是非感知的領域,進入了感知和感覺的停止,在其中居住。
—————–
arisen大學的大學何處完全停止了? 在這裡,一隻Bhikkhus,Bhikkhu,完全超越了既不是感知 - 也不是非感知,進入感知和感覺的停止,在其中居住,並且在這裡,平等的能力完全停止了。 據說這一點,Bhikkhus,’一個眾所周知,一位Bhikkhu,陷入困境的平靜的戒菸將思想集中在宗旨。

把父母送養老院行嗎?這位高僧的回答震撼了全世界,請大家讓更多人看看,功德無量!
| 禪語
精彩視頻:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8e2IfH4N8U&t=62s這4大生肖最有佛緣!此生註定有佛菩薩保佑,一生富貴平安!快看看有沒有你https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIZklpoZ59c&t=14s死是什麼感覺?瀕死病人述說死前30秒,…



41)
Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,

સારા શુદ્ધ મનમાં જણાવાયું છે કે જાગૃત
એસએન 48.40 (એસ વિરુદ્ધ 213)
ઉપપેસિપિયા સુતા
પ્રગતિશીલ ક્રમમાં -
[ud + paṭipṭika]
‘સમૃદ્ધિના ફેકલ્ટીના સમાપ્તિને ધ્યાનમાં રાખીને તે ધ્યાનમાં રાખીને મનને ધ્યાનમાં રાખીને મનને ધ્યાન કેન્દ્રિત કરે છે.’
ન તો-પર્સેપ્શન-નોન-નોન-એનિવેશનના ક્ષેત્રમાં સંપૂર્ણપણે જતા રહેવું, ખ્યાલ અને લાગણીના સમાપ્તિમાં પ્રવેશ કર્યો, તેમાં વસવાટ કરો.
——————-
અને ઉષ્ણકટિબંધીય
ફેકલ્ટી ક્યાં છે? અહીં, ભીખુસ, ભીખુસ, ન તો-પર્સેપ્શનની ગોળાકારની બહારથી
આગળ વધી રહ્યો છે - કે બિન-ખ્યાલ, ખ્યાલ અને લાગણીના સમાપ્તિમાં પ્રવેશ
કર્યો હતો, તેમાં વસવાટ કરે છે, અને તે અહીં છે
કે તે સમૃદ્ધિ ફેકલ્ટી સંપૂર્ણપણે બંધ થાય છે. આનાથી એવું કહેવામાં આવ્યું
છે કે, ભીખુસ, ‘એક ભિક્ખુને વિષુવવૃત્તીય ફેકલ્ટીના સમાપ્તિને ધ્યાનમાં
રાખીને મનને ધ્યાનમાં રાખીને ધ્યાનમાં રાખવામાં આવે છે.’
༸སྐྱབས་རྗེ་འཁྲུལ་ཞིག་ཡང་སྲིད་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག
སྤྱི་ལོ་ ༢༠༢༡ H.H Trulshik Yangsi Rinpoche 2021




53)
Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,

Public

気をつけて純粋に目覚めたものを言った
SN 48.40(S V 213)
uppałipāṭikasutta.
- プログレッシブオーダーで -
[UD +Pałipčika]
「等価体部の中止を知っていることを知っていたことは、心を目的として心を集めています。」
知覚や感覚の範囲の範囲を超えて、知覚&感情の停止に入った範囲を超えて、そこに住む。
———————-
そして、アリゼの大学部はどこで完全に停止しますか? ここでは、認識や感情の停止を終えていない、認識や感情の範囲を越えて完全に行っていたBhikkhus、Bhikkhuuが完全に入り、そこに住んでいて、ここでは全体的に停止することがここにあります。 これは、Bhikkhus、Bhikkhuが「等思質学部の中止を知っているBhikkhu」と言われています。
《奥妙冰凌花》
长在玻璃上 【03/26】
大自然是最伟大的艺术家,具有非凡的创造力,但一般人不容易体


55)
Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,

ಒಳ್ಳೆಯ ಶುದ್ಧೀಕರಿಸುವ ಮನಸ್ಸು ಎಚ್ಚರಗೊಂಡ ಒಂದು ಹೇಳಿದರು
SN 48.40 (ಎಸ್ v 213)
ಅಪ್ಪೈಪಿಕಾ ಸುಟ್ಟಾ
- ಪ್ರಗತಿಪರ ಕ್ರಮದಲ್ಲಿ -
[ud + paṭipāṭika]
‘ಸಮಚಿತ್ತತೆಯ ಬೋಧನಾ ವಿಭಾಗದ ವಿಭಾಗದ ನಿಷೇಧವು ಮನಸ್ಸನ್ನು ಗುರಿಯಾಗಿ ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಕರಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.’
ಪರ್ಸೆಪ್ಷನ್-ಆರ್-ಪರ್ಸೆಪ್ಷನ್ಗಳ ಗೋಳವನ್ನು ಮೀರಿ ಸಂಪೂರ್ಣವಾಗಿ ಹೋದ ನಂತರ, ಗ್ರಹಿಕೆ ಮತ್ತು ಭಾವನೆಯ ನಿಲುಗಡೆಗೆ ಪ್ರವೇಶಿಸಿ, ಅದರಲ್ಲಿ ನೆಲೆಸಿದೆ.
——————
ಮತ್ತು ಸಮಚಿತ್ತತೆಯಿಂದ ಹುಟ್ಟಿದ ಬೋಧಕವರ್ಗವು ಸಂಪೂರ್ಣವಾಗಿ
ನಿಲ್ಲುತ್ತದೆ? ಇಲ್ಲಿ, ಭಿಕ್ಖಸ್, ಭುಕ್ಖಸ್, ಪರ್ಸೆಪ್ಷನ್-ಆರ್-ಪರ್ಸೆಪ್ಷನ್ನ ಗೋಳಕ್ಕೂ
ಮೀರಿದೆ, ಗ್ರಹಿಕೆ ಮತ್ತು ಭಾವನೆಯ ನಿಲುಗಡೆಗೆ ಪ್ರವೇಶಿಸಿ, ಅದರಲ್ಲಿ ನೆಲೆಸಿದೆ,
ಮತ್ತು ಇಲ್ಲಿನ ಸಮಚಿತ್ತತೆಯ ಬೋಧಕವರ್ಗವು ಸಂಪೂರ್ಣವಾಗಿ ಸ್ಥಗಿತಗೊಳ್ಳುತ್ತದೆ.
ಇದನ್ನು ಭುಕ್ಕಾಸ್ ಎಂದು ಹೇಳಲಾಗುತ್ತದೆ, ‘ಸಮಚಿತ್ತತೆಯ ಬೋಧನಾ ವಿಭಾಗದ ವಿಭಾಗದ
ವಿಭಾಗದ ನಿಷೇಧವನ್ನು ತಿಳಿದಿರುವ ಒಂದು ಗುರಿ ಎಂದು ಮನಸ್ಸನ್ನು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಕರಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.

ಮನಸ್ಸಿನ
ಹತೋಟಿ ಹೇಗೆ ? ಧ್ಯಾನ ಹೇಗೆ ಮಾಡಬೇಕು ? || How to control Mind ? How to Meditate ?


59)
Classical Korean-고전 한국어,

좋은 정화가 깨어났다
SN 48.40 (s v 213)
Uppaðipāţika Sutta.
- 진보적 인 명령 -
[UD + Paðipāţika]
‘두뇌의 교수진의 중단을 알고 있으면 그것은 그 것과 함께 마음을 집중시킵니다.’
지각이나 느낌의 중단에 들어갔을 때, 지각이나 비 지각의 영역을 넘어서 완전히 사라졌습니다.
——————————————————————————————
그리고 평범한 교수진은 어디에서 완전히
중단됩니까? 여기에, 지각이나 비 지각의 범위를 벗어나지 않고, 지각과 느낌의 중단을 시작하고, 뇌의 교수진이 완전히 멈추는 것이
완전히 좌우 된 바이 쿠후 (Bhikkhus)는 완전히 사라졌습니다. 이것은 이에 대해 말합니다.
(우리말해석)
숫타니파타 : 1. 뱀의 비유 (Sutta Nipāta, 듣는 불교경전)

[숫타니파타]는 수많은 불교 경전 중에서도 가장 초기에 이루어진 경전이다. 역사적인 인물로서 불타 석가모니와 초기 불교를 이해하는 아주 중요한 자료이다.불교 경전은 원래 눈으로 읽는 문자로 쓰여지지 않고 부처의 가….


62)
Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,

ເຮັດແນວຄິດຄວາມສະອາດທີ່ດີກ່າວວ່າການຕື່ນຕົວ
SN 48.40 (s v 213)
Uppaṭipāṭṭika STATTA
- ໃນຄໍາສັ່ງທີ່ກ້າວຫນ້າ -
[ud + paṭipāṭika]
‘ໄດ້ຮູ້ຈັກການຢຸດເຊົາຂອງຄະນະວິຊາຂອງຄະນະວິຊາທີ່ເຂັ້ມຂຸ້ນໃນຈິດໃຈທີ່ເປັນຈຸດປະສົງ.’
ມີຫຼາຍກວ່າໂລກເກີນຂອບເຂດຂອງການບໍ່ເຂົ້າໃຈແລະບໍ່ແມ່ນຄວາມຮັບຮູ້, ໂດຍໄດ້ເຂົ້າໄປໃນການຢຸດຢັ້ງຄວາມຮັບຮູ້ແລະຄວາມຮູ້ສຶກ, ສະຖິດຢູ່ໃນນັ້ນ.
——————–
ແລະຄະນະກໍາມະການເກີດຂື້ນຂອງຄວາມສະດວກສະບາຍຢູ່ໃສ? ຢູ່ທີ່ນີ້, Bhikkhus, A Bhikkhu, ໂດຍໄດ້ຮັບຜົນປະໂຫຍດທັງຫມົດຂອງຄວາມຮັບຮູ້ແລະຄວາມຮູ້ສຶກ, ແລະມັນຢູ່ທີ່ນີ້ທີ່ຄະນະວິຊາການສະເຫມີພາບ. ມັນໄດ້ຖືກເວົ້າກ່ຽວກັບສິ່ງນີ້, “A
Bhikkhu ໄດ້ຮູ້ຈັກການຢຸດເຊົາຂອງຄະນະວິຊາຂອງຄະນະທີ່ເຂັ້ມຂຸ້ນກັບສິ່ງທີ່ເປັນຈຸດປະສົງ. ‘
โลก
360 องศา ชุด อยู่รอด อย่างเป็นสุข ในศตวรรษที่ 21 ตอน เก่ง ดี มีคุณธรรม


69)
Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,

Melakukan pemurnian yang baik berkata yang terbangun
SN 48.40 (S v 213)
Uppaṭipāṭika sutta.
- Dalam perintah progresif -
[Ud + paṭipāṭika]
‘Setelah mengetahui pemberhentian Fakulti Keseimbangan menumpukan minda dengan itu sebagai tujuan.’
Setelah
melampaui sfera tidak persepsi-nor-non-persepsi, setelah memasuki
pemberhentian persepsi & perasaan, tinggal di dalamnya.
——————-
Dan
di manakah fakulti yang timbul dari Equanimity berhenti sepenuhnya? Di
sini, Bhikkhu, seorang Bhikkhu, setelah melampaui sfera tidak
persepsi-nor-non-persepsi, setelah
memasuki pemberhentian persepsi dan perasaan, tinggal di dalamnya, dan
di sini bahawa fakulti keseimbangan tidak lagi terhenti. Dikatakan
tentang ini, Bhikkhu, ‘Bhikkhu yang mengetahui pemberhentian Fakulti
Keseimbangan menumpukan minda dengan itu sebagai
tujuan.’
Live
Dharma Talk | 9/01/2022, Plum Village, France
“A
la Carte” Dharma Talk by Sister Chân Đức (Sister True Virtue) from Plum
Village, as part of a Day of Mindfulness in our Winter Retreat 2022


70)
Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

Public

നല്ല ശുദ്ധീകരണ മനസ്സ് ഉണർന്നിരിക്കുന്നയാൾ പറഞ്ഞു
എസ്എൻ 48.40 (എസ് v 213)
ഉപ്പ്പൈപേഖേഖക്ക സുട്ട
- പുരോഗമന ക്രമത്തിൽ -
[ud + Paṭipāṭika]
‘സമനികതയുടെ ഫാക്കൽറ്റിയുടെ വിരാമം അറിയുന്നത് ഒരു ലക്ഷ്യമായി മനസ്സിനെ കേന്ദ്രീകരിക്കുന്നു.’
ആരും-പെർസെപ്റ്റൻ അല്ലെങ്കിൽ - ധിക്കാരംക്കല്ല, ഗർഭധാരണവും വികാരവും അവസാനിപ്പിച്ച് അതിൽ വസിക്കുന്നു.
——————
സമനിയുടെ അരികിലുള്ള
ഫാക്കൽറ്റി എവിടെയാണ്? ഇവിടെ, ഭിക്ഷസ്, ധാരണാപത്രങ്ങൾ, ധാരണയില്ലാത്ത
ഗർഭധാരണത്തിനപ്പുറത്തേക്ക് പോയി, ഗർഭധാരണത്തിന്റെയും വികാരത്തിന്റെയും
ഗുരുതരമായതിനാൽ അതിൽ വസിക്കുന്നു, അതിൽ വസിക്കുന്നു,
തുല്യതയുടെ ഫാക്കൽറ്റിന്റെ ഫാക്കൽറ്റി തീർത്തും അവസാനിക്കുന്നു. ഭീഖുസ്,
‘ഒരു ഭിഖു’ ഒരു ഭീമ ഫാക്കൽറ്റിയുടെ വിരാമം അറിഞ്ഞ ഒരു ഭാക്തൻ അത് ഒരു
ലക്ഷ്യമായി മനസിലാക്കുന്നു. ‘

73)
Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,

चांगला शुद्ध मनाने जागृत केले
एसएन 48.40 (एस व्ही 213)
Uppaṭipṭika sutta
- प्रगतीशील क्रमाने -
[UD + Paṭipṭṭika]
‘समतोलपणाच्या संकायच्या समाप्तीची समाप्ती लक्षात घेऊन मनाने हे लक्ष्य म्हणून मन केंद्रित करते.’
समजूतदारपणा आणि भावनांच्या समाप्तीमध्ये प्रवेश केला जात नाही, किंवा-नस्ली-नॉन-दृष्टीकोनातून पूर्णपणे जाणे, त्यामध्ये राहते.
——————–
आणि समतोलपणाचे गुणधर्म
पूर्णपणे थांबतात? येथे, भिक्खस, एक भिकुहु, पूर्णपणे धारणा आणि भावनांच्या
समाप्तीस प्रवेश करीत नाही, त्यामध्ये पूर्णपणे निघून गेला आहे, त्यामध्ये
राहतो आणि येथे आहे की समतोलपणाचे संकलन
पूर्णपणे बंद होते. याबद्दल असे म्हटले जाते की, भिक्खुस, ‘एक भिकुहू यांनी
ओळखले आहे की समतोलपणाच्या संकायच्या समाप्तीमुळे मनाने लक्ष केंद्रित
केले आहे.’
भगवान
Buddha की Mahaprinirvan (मृत्यु) कैसे हुई? जानिए! How did Lord Buddha die?
Bhagwan
Buddh ki mrityu kese hui?Report by Hemant Kumar BauddhSpeaker-
Bauddhachrya Shanti Swaroop Bauddh#Buddha’s_real_Story
#Buddha_Mahaprinirvana #Real_Fa…



75)
Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

ကောင်းသော purify စိတ်ကိုနိုးထတတှငျကဆိုသည်
sn 48.40 (s ကို 213)
Uppaṭipāṭika Sutta
- တိုးတက်သောအမိန့်တွင် -
[ud + paṭipāṭika]
‘’ ဥပေက္ခေတာရဲ့ရပ်တန့်ရေးဌာနရဲ့ရပ်တန့်ရေးကိုသိပြီးဒီစိတ်ကိုရည်ရွယ်ချက်အဖြစ်အာရုံစူးစိုက်စေတယ်ဆိုတာသိလား။ ‘
လုံးဝအမြင်အာရုံနှင့်မသက်ဆိုင်သောအမြင်အာရုံထက် ကျော်လွန်. လုံးဝပျောက်ကွယ်သွားခြင်း,
——————————
နှင့်အတူဥပေက္ခေဆန်၏ arrisen arrisen သည်မည်သည့်နေရာ၌လုံးလုံးလျားလျားလုံးဝရပ်တည်သနည်း။ ရဟန်းတို့ဤသည်မှာရဟန်းသည်လုံးဝသညာနှင့်ခံစားမှုကင်းမဲ့ခြင်းကို ကျော်လွန်. လုံးဝပျောက်ကွယ်သွားခြင်း, ရဟန်းတို့ဤသည်ဟုဆိုလိုသဟဇာတရဟန်၏ချုပ်ရာကိုသိတော်မူ။
,
နံနက်ခင်း
ပရိတ် ပဌာန်းတရားတော် Morning chanting.
တန်ဆောင်မုန်းလပြည့်နေ့
အကြောင်းနှင့် သာမညဖလသုတ် အကျဥ်းချုပ် တရားတော် အောက်စဖိုဒ့်ဆရာတော်ဘုရား#သာမညဖလသုတ်…



76)
Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),

राम्रो शुद्ध मनले जागा रह्यो कि
SN 48 48.400 (s v 213)
Uppaṭipeṭka Sutta
- प्रगतिशील क्रममा -
[ud + Pṭipipātai]
‘इक्विटीको संकायताको झोलानीलाई थाहा छ कि एक लक्ष्यको रूपमा दिमागलाई ध्यान दिनुहोस्।’
पूरै अव्यवस्थाको
थैलीमा प्रवेश गरेको न त खुलासापूर्व क्षेत्र भन्दा पर जानुभएको छ, न त
धारणा र भावनाको घेरामा प्रवेश गरेको, यसमा बसोबास गर्नुहोस्।
————————–
र Ilisnen समीकरण को
इक्वेनिमिटी को लागी पूरै कहाँ रोकिन्छ? यहाँ, भिखंख, भिख्त्ह, प्रत्यक्ष
ज्ञान र भावनाको घेरा भित्र पस्दै, त्यहाँ बास गरेको, र इक्वेमिटीको
संकायमा बस्दै आएको छ, र इक्मेचीताको संकाय पूर्ण
रूपमा बन्द हुन्छ। यसबारे भनिएको छ, ‘एक भिखंह इक्वेनिमिटिमिटीको संकायको
थैबेशन थाहा पाएर यो दिमागलाई उद्देश्यको रूपमा ध्यान दिनुहोस्।’
भगवान
बुद्ध के अग्रश्रावक सारिपुत्र-मोद्गल्यायन कैसे बने? | Buddha & His Dhamma | Dr. Rajendra Fule
@AWAAZ
INDIA TV | Buddha & His Dhamma | Episode 89 : Dr. Rajendra Fule


78)
Classical Odia (Oriya)

ଭଲ ଶୁଦ୍ଧ ମନ ଯାହା ଜାଗ୍ରତ ହେଲା କହିଲା |
SN 48.40 (S V 213)
OPPAIPṭKIKIKA STATA |
- ପ୍ରଗତିଶୀଳ କ୍ରମରେ -
[UD + ପାଘ୍ନୀ]
‘ସନ୍ତୁଳନର ଅଧ୍ୟାପିକାଙ୍କ ସେତଶିକ୍ଷତତା ଜଣାପଡିଛି ମନକୁ ଏକ ଲକ୍ଷ୍ୟ ଭାବରେ ଏହା ସହିତ ଏକାକୀ ରଖିଥାଏ।’
କ conf ଣସି ଧାରଣା-କୀଟନାଖଣ୍ଡର କ୍ଷେତ୍ର ଅତିକ୍ରମ କରି ନ ence େ ନାହିଁ, ଧାରଣା ଏବଂ ଅନୁଭବର ବନ୍ଦରେ ପ୍ରବେଶ କରି, ସେଠାରେ ବାସ କରନ୍ତି |
——————
ଏବଂ ଇକାନିମାଇଟି ଏକ
ଅନ୍ସନାଇଟି ସମନ୍ୱୟର ଆଜ୍ଞାକାରୀ ଅଧ୍ୟାପନା କେଉଁଠାରେ ବନ୍ଦ ହୋଇଯାଏ? ଏଠାରେ,
ଘାଇକହୁଥ, ଏକ ଧକୂଲ୍ସ କିମ୍ବା ଅନୁଭବର ବନ୍ଦକୁ କ characterf ଣସି ଅନୁପଯୁକ୍ତ
ଦ୍ରବ୍ୟର କ୍ଷେତ୍ର ଅତିକ୍ରମ କରି, ଏହା ଏଠାରେ ଅଛି ଯାହା ଏଠାରେ
ଇଞ୍ଜିନିମିଟିକର ଅଧ୍ୟାଣ୍ଡୀ ହୋଇଯାଆନ୍ତି | ଏହା କୁହାଯାଏ, ମିଥୁସ୍, ‘ଜଣେ ଭିକ୍କହୁ
ସନ୍ତୁଳନର ଅଧିପତିର ବନ୍ଦ ଜାଣିଥିଲେ ଯାହା ଲକ୍ଷ୍ୟ ଭାବରେ ମନକୁ ସେହି ସହିତ ଧାରଣା
କରେ।’

CBSE
Class 10 Physics Chapterwise Marks Distribution 2021 | Physics Marking Scheme Board Exam 10
CBSE
Class 10 Physics Chapterwise Marks Distribution 2021 | Physics Marking
Scheme Board Exam 10 | Vedantu Class 9 and 10. Physics Marks
Distribution | Class…

83)
Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,

ਚੰਗੇ ਸ਼ੁੱਧ ਦਿਮਾਗ ਨੂੰ ਮੰਨਦੇ ਹਨ
ਐਸ ਐਨ 48.40 (s ਵੀ 213)
ਉਪਟਿਪੀਪਾਕਾ ਸੂਟਾ
- ਪ੍ਰਗਤੀਸ਼ੀਲ ਕ੍ਰਮ ਵਿੱਚ -
[ud + paṭipika]
‘ਸਮਾਨਤਾ ਦੀ ਫੈਕਲਟੀ ਦਾ ਅੰਤ ਤੋਂ ਪਤਾ ਹੋਣਾ ਇਕ ਉਦੇਸ਼ ਦੇ ਤੌਰ ਤੇ ਉਸ ਨਾਲ ਧਿਆਨ ਕੇਂਦਰਤ ਕਰਦਾ ਹੈ.’
ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਕਦੇ ਨਾ-ਧਾਰਨਾ ਤੋਂ ਪਰੇ, ਜਿਸ ਵਿੱਚ ਕਨੂੰਨੀ ਅਤੇ ਭਾਵਨਾ ਦੇ ਸਮਾਪਤ ਹੋ ਕੇ, ਇਸ ਵਿੱਚ ਵੱਸਦੇ ਹਨ.
——————–
ਅਤੇ
ਸਮਾਨਤਾ ਦਾ ਅਰਾਈਜ਼ਿਨ ਫੈਕਲਟੀ ਪੂਰੀ ਤਰ੍ਹਾਂ ਕਿੱਥੇ ਰੁਕਦੀ ਹੈ? ਇੱਥੇ, ਭਿੱਖੁ,
ਭੁੱਖਾ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਨਾ ਨਾ–ਧਾਰਨਾ ਤੋਂ ਪਰੇ ਹੈ, ਜਿਸ
ਵਿੱਚ ਨਾ ਤਾਂ ਇਸ ਗੱਲ ਦਾ ਸਾਹਮਣਾ ਕਰਨਾ
ਪੈਂਦਾ ਹੈ, ਅਤੇ ਇਸ ਨੂੰ ਸਮਾਨਤਾ ਦੀ ਫੈਕਲਟੀ ਪੂਰੀ ਤਰ੍ਹਾਂ ਬੰਦ ਹੋ ਜਾਂਦੀ ਹੈ. ਇਹ
ਕਿਹਾ ਜਾਂਦਾ ਹੈ ਕਿ ਭਿੱਖੂ ‘ਇਕ ਭੀਾਨੁਇਮਤਾ ਦੀ ਫੈਕਲਟੀ ਦਾ ਬੰਦ ਹੋਣਾ ਇਕ ਉਦੇਸ਼ ਵਜੋਂ
ਧਿਆਨ ਕੇਂਦ੍ਰਤ ਕਰਦਾ ਹੈ.’
ਹਰੀ
ਮਿਰਚ,ਸਿਮਲਾ ਮਿਰਚ ਵਿਚ ਪੱਤੇ ਇਕੱਠੇ (ਪੱਤੇ ਮੁੜਨ ) ਦਾ ਕਾਰਨ ਅਤੇ ਹੱਲ
ਮਿਰਚਾ
ਵਿਚ ਪੱਤੇ ਮੁੜਨ ਦੀ ਸਮੱਸਿਆ ਬਹੁਤ ਜਿਆਦਾ ਆੳਦੀ ਹੈ ਉਸ ਦਾ ਕਿਸ ਤਰੀਕੇ ਨਾਲ ਹੱਲ ਕਰਨਾ ਹੈ

87)
Classical Sanskrit छ्लस्सिचल् षन्स्क्रित्

ढो ङूड् Pउरिफ़्य् ंइन्ड् सैड् ते आwअकेनेड् Oने
Sण् 48.40 (S व् 213)
ऊप्पṭइप्āṭइक Sउट्ट
— ईन् प्रोग्रेस्सिवे ओर्डेर् —
[उड्+पṭइप्āṭइक]
‘ःअविन्ग् क्नोwन् ते cएस्सटिओन् ओफ़् ते फ़cउल्ट्य् ओफ़् एक़ुअनिमिट्य् cओन्cएन्ट्रटेस् ते मिन्ड् wइत् तट् अस् अन् ऐम्.’
ःअविन्ग् cओम्प्लेटेल्य् गोने बेयोन्ड् ते स्फेरे ओफ़् नेइतेर्-पेर्cएप्टिओन्-नोर्-नोन्-पेर्cएप्टिओन्,हविन्ग् एन्टेरेड् ते cएस्सटिओन् ओफ़् पेर्cएप्टिओन् & फ़ीलिन्ग्,ड्wएल्ल्स् तेरेइन्.
——————
आन्ड् wहेरे डोएस् ते
अरिसेन् फ़cउल्ट्य् ओफ़् एक़ुअनिमिट्य् cएअसे टोटल्ल्य्? ःएरे, भिक्खुस्, अ
भिक्खु, हविन्ग् cओम्प्लेटेल्य् गोने बेयोन्ड् ते स्फेरे ओफ़्
नेइतेर्-पेर्cएप्टिओन्-नोर्-नोन्-पेर्cएप्टिओन्, हविन्ग् एन्टेरेड्
ते cएस्सटिओन् ओफ़् पेर्cएप्टिओन् अन्ड् फ़ीलिन्ग्, ड्wएल्ल्स् तेरेइन्,
अन्ड् इट् इस् हेरे तट् ते फ़cउल्ट्य् ओफ़् एक़ुअनिमिट्य् cएअसेस् टोटल्ल्य्.
ईट् इस् सैड् ओफ़् तिस्, भिक्खुस्, ‘अ भिक्खु हविन्ग् क्नोwन् ते cएस्सटिओन्
ओफ़् ते फ़cउल्ट्य् ओफ़् एक़ुअनिमिट्य् cओन्cएन्ट्रटेस्
ते मिन्ड् wइत् तट् अस् अन् ऐम्.’

youtube.com

भगवान
बुद्ध के पास राजा बिंबिसार बारह लाख लोग लेकर क्यों पहुंचे? | Buddha & His Dhamma


92)
Classical Sindhi,

Public

سٺو پاڪ ڪيو ذهن چيو ته جاڳيل هڪ
SN 48.40 (ايس وي 213)
upapipānika Sutta
- ترقي پسند آرڊر ۾ -
[UD + PANIPICAICA]
‘هڪجهڙائي جي فيڪلٽي جي خاتمي کي سڃاڻي ٿو ته ذهن کي هڪ مقصد طور تي تسليم ڪيو.
مڪمل طور تي نه-تمنه جي دائري کان ٻاهر نڪري ويو آهي نه، ۽ نه-غير تصورات جو خاتمو ۽ احساس جي خاتمي جو خاتمو، ان ۾ رهڻ.
—————-
۽ ايڪنس جي اتحاد واري
فيڪلٽي ڪٿي ختم ٿيندي آهي؟ هيڊي، ٽالم جي جيڪو ردومان- ڪرو ٿيو ٿيو ئي
ڪوشش ۽ بڪام جي حد کان برداشت ڪري رهيو آهي. اهو چيو ويندو آهي، بيڪن ميڪا،
هڪ بيڪ ميڪا مسڪين جي فيڪلٽي جو خاتمو آهي
ته ذهن کي هڪ مقصد جي طور تي ڌيان ڏئي ٿو.
Loving
Kindness Birthday Lankarama Buddhist Temple
Please
kindly subscribe our channel.https://www.youtube.com/c/IndianaBuddhistTemple IG & FB: @Indiana.Buddhist.Temple @BhanteDevanandaVenmo: @Indiana-Buddhis…


93) Classical Sinhala-සම්භාව්ය සිංහල,

Public

හොඳ පිරිසිදු කිරීමේ මනසක් කරන්න
Sn 48.40 (s v 213)
Uspausipāṭika Sutta
- ප්රගතිශීලී පිළිවෙලට -
[ud + pazipāinaika]
සමානාත්මතාවයේ පී ulty ය නැවැත්වීම දැන සිටීම මනස ඒ සමඟම අරමුණක් ලෙස සාන්ද්රණය කරයි. ‘
සංජානනය සහ හැඟීම නැවැත්වීමට ඇතුළු වී එහි වාසය කරන සංජානනය හෝ සංජානනය ඉක්මවා නොගත් ඒවා ඉක්මවා යාමෙන් සම්පූර්ණයෙන්ම පහව ගියේය.
———————
සමානාත්මතාවයේ
පී ulty ය මුළුමනින්ම නතර කරන්නේ කොහේද? මෙන්න, භික්ෂූන් වහන්සේ, භික්ෂූන්
වහන්සේලා, සංජානනය හා හැඟීම නැවැත්වීමට, සංජානනය හා හැඟීම නැවැත්වීමට
ඇතුළු වූ භික්ෂූන්
වහන්සේලා එහි වාසය කරයි, සමානාත්මතාවයේ පී ulty ය මුළුමනින්ම නතර වේ.
සමානාත්මතාවයේ පී ulty ය නැවැත්වීම දන්නා භික්ෂූන් වහන්සේලා, ‘භික්ෂූන්
වහන්සේව සමානාත්මතාවයේ පී ulty ය නැවැත්වීම දන්නා භික්ෂූන් වහන්සේලාගේ
අරමුණක් ලෙස මනස සංකේන්ද්රණය කරයි.’
Buddha
Vandana l Sinhala Chanting With English Subtitles

    • 102)
      Classical Tamil-பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி,

      Public

      நல்ல சுத்திகரிப்பு மனதில் எழுந்திரு
      SN 48.40 (S V 213)
      Uppaṭipṭṭṭika Sutta.
      - முற்போக்கான வரிசையில் -
      [UD + PAṭIPṭṭIKA]
      ‘சமநிலையின் ஆசிரியரின் நிறுத்தத்தை அறிந்திருப்பது ஒரு நோக்கம் என்று மனதில் கவனம் செலுத்துகிறது.’
      எந்தவிதமான-கருத்துக்களுக்கும் அப்பால் முழுமையாகப் போயிருக்கவில்லை-அல்லாத கருத்துக்களுக்கு அப்பால் போய்விட்டது;
      ——————–
      எங்கு
      சமத்துவமின்மையின் எழுச்சி எங்கு முற்றுகையிடுவது? இங்கே, பிக்ஹுஸ், ஒரு
      பிக்ஹு, ஒருபோதும் கருத்து வேறுபாடு அல்ல, கருத்து வேறுபாடு அல்ல, கருத்து
      வேறுபாடு மற்றும் உணர்வின்
      இடைவிடாமல், அதில் இருந்து வசிக்கிறார், அதில் எங்கு இருக்கிறார், அது
      சமநிலையின் ஆசிரியரை முற்றிலும் நிறுத்திவிட்டது. இது இவ்வாறு கூறுகிறது,
      பிக்ஹஸ், ‘சமபகாரத்தின் ஆசிரியர்களின் நிறுத்தத்தை அறிந்த ஒரு பிக்ஹு ஒரு
      நோக்கம் என்று மனதில் கவனம் செலுத்துகிறது.’

      Buddha
      and Buddhism history in tamil (புத்த சமயம்)
      #valavantutorials,
      புத்த சமயம் (கி.மு.567 & கி.மு.487)புத்தரின் இயற்பெயர் சித்தார்த்தர். அவரும் மகாவீரர் வாழ்ந்த காலக்கட்டத்தில் ….


  • 104)
    Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు,

    మంచి శుద్ధి మనస్సు జాగృతం ఒక చెప్పారు
    SN 48.40 (S v 213)
    అప్పగింత
    - ప్రగతిశీల క్రమంలో -
    [ud + paṭipāṭika]
    ‘సమతుల్యత యొక్క అధ్యాపకుల విరమణకు గురిచేసినట్లు తెలిసింది.’
    పర్సెప్షన్ & ఫీలింగ్ యొక్క విరమణలోకి ప్రవేశించినప్పుడు, అప్రమత్తమైన మరియు భావన యొక్క గోళము దాటి పోయింది.
    ——————
    మరియు
    సమం యొక్క ఉత్సాహభరితమైన అధ్యాపకులు పూర్తిగా తొలగిపోతున్నారా? ఇక్కడ,
    భిక్ఖస్, ఒక భిక్కూ, అవగాహన-లేదా-కాని అవగాహన యొక్క గోళానికి మించి
    పోయింది, అవగాహన మరియు భావన యొక్క
    విరమణలోకి ప్రవేశించి, దానిలో నివసిస్తుంది, మరియు ఇది సమాధి యొక్క
    అధ్యాపకులు పూర్తిగా ఉండదు. దీని గురించి ఇది చెప్పబడింది, భిక్హస్, ‘ఒక
    భిక్ఖు సమన్వయ యొక్క అధ్యాపకుడి విరమణను తెలిపారు.
    Ask
    A Monk: Value of Jhana
    “Dear
    Yuttadhammo, how much value do you put on the practice of jhana? Didn’t
    the Buddha advocate jhana practice at least up to a point, and does it
    not have…

  • ทำใจให้บริสุทธิ์ที่ดีกล่าวว่าคนที่ตื่นขึ้น
    SN 48.40 (S v 213)
    uppaṭipāṭika sutta
    - ในลำดับที่โปรเกรสซีฟ -
    [UD + Paṭipāṭika]
    ‘เมื่อมีคนรู้จักการหยุดของคณะความใจเย็นมุ่งเน้นไปที่ความคิดที่เป็นจุดมุ่งหมาย’
    หลังจากผ่านไปอย่างสมบูรณ์เกินขอบเขตของการรับรู้ - หรือไม่ใช่การรับรู้โดยได้เข้าสู่การหยุดการรับรู้และความรู้สึกอาศัยอยู่ในนั้น
    ——————
    และคณะผู้บัญชาการแห่งความสงบสุขหยุดอยู่ที่ไหน ที่นี่ Bhikkhus, Bhikkhu ที่ผ่านไปอย่างสมบูรณ์เกินขอบเขตของการรับรู้ - หรือไม่ใช่การรับรู้โดยได้เข้าสู่การหยุดการรับรู้และความรู้สึกอาศัยอยู่ในนั้นและอยู่ที่นี่ที่คณะมีความใจเย็นสิ้นสุดลงอย่างสิ้นเชิง
    มันถูกกล่าวถึงเรื่องนี้ Bhikkhus ‘Bhikkhu ได้รู้จักการหยุดของคณะความใจเย็นมุ่งเน้นไปที่จิตใจที่เป็นจุดมุ่งหมาย’

    เปรียบน้ำตากับน้ำในมหาสมุทร
    - อัสสุสูตร | Assu Sutta (Tears) with English Subtitle
    #SaṃsāraSaṃsāra
    has no known beginnings nor known ends.When beings, hindered by
    ignorance, fettered by craving, drifting, transmigrating; The beginnings
    and …
  • 109) Classical Urdu-
    کلاسیکی اردو

  • اچھا لگاؤ دماغ نے کہا کہ بیداری ایک
    SN 48.40 (S V 213)
    uppařaipkaṭika سوٹٹا
    - ترقی پسند حکم میں -
    [ud + paṭipāṭika]
    ‘مساوات کے فیکلٹی کے خاتمے کے بارے میں معلوم ہوتا ہے کہ اس مقصد کے ساتھ دماغ پر توجہ مرکوز ہے.’
    مکمل
    طور پر نہ صرف تصور کے شعبے سے باہر نکلنے کے بعد، نہ ہی غیر تصور، تصور
    اور احساس کی روک تھام میں داخل ہونے کے بعد، اس میں رہتا ہے.
    ——————
    اور
    مساوات کے عصمت کے فیکلٹی کو مکمل طور پر ختم کیا جاتا ہے؟ یہاں، بھیککھ،
    ایک بھیککو، مکمل طور پر نہ صرف تصور کے شعبے سے باہر نکلنے کے بعد، اور نہ
    ہی غیر
    تصور کے نتیجے میں، اس میں رہتا ہے، اس میں رہتا ہے، اور یہ یہاں ہے کہ
    مساوات کے فیکلٹی مکمل طور پر ختم ہوجاتا ہے. یہ اس کے بارے میں کہا جاتا
    ہے، بھیکخ، ‘ایک بھیکو نے مساوات کے فیکلٹی کے خاتمے کو معلوم کیا ہے کہ اس
    مقصد کے طور پر دماغ پر توجہ مرکوز ہے.’
    3
    HOURS Relax Ambient Music | Wonderful Playlist Lounge Chillout | New Age

    112)
    Classical Vietnamese-Tiếng Việ,

    Làm tâm trí thanh lọc tốt cho biết một người thức dậy
    SN 48,40 (S V 213)
    Kinh điển uppaṭipāṭika.
    - theo thứ tự tiến bộ -
    [ud + paṭipāṭika]
    ‘Đã biết sự chấm dứt của Khoa Bình đẳng tập trung tâm trí với điều đó như một mục tiêu.’
    Đã hoàn toàn vượt ra
    ngoài phạm vi không có nhận thức không phải là không nhận thức, đã chấm
    nhập sự chấm dứt nhận thức & cảm giác, sống trong đó.
    ——————
    Và Khoa Arisen của sự
    bình đẳng chấm dứt hoàn toàn là ở đâu? Ở đây, Bhikkhus, một Tỳ kheo, đã
    hoàn toàn vượt ra ngoài phạm vi của sự nhận thức không phải là người
    không nhận thức, đã bước vào sự chấm dứt nhận
    thức và cảm giác, sống trong đó, và đó là nơi mà Khoa bình đẳng chấm dứt
    hoàn toàn. Người ta nói về điều này, Bhikkhus, ‘Một Tỳ kheo đã biết
    việc chấm dứt Khoa Bình đẳng tập trung tâm trí với mục đích đó như một
    mục tiêu.’

    Những
    Lời Phật Dạy - Tỳ Khưu Bodhi - Chương 9 - Chiếu Sáng Tuệ Quang



  • Ethical Conduct
    Right Intention
    (Samma Sankappa)
    The second factor of the path is called in Pali samma
    sankappa, which we will translate as “right intention.” The term is
    sometimes translated as “right thought,” a rendering that can be
    accepted if we add the proviso that in the present context
    the word “thought” refers specifically to the purposive or conative
    aspect of mental activity, the cognitive aspect being covered by the
    first factor, right view. It would be artificial, however, to insist too
    strongly on the division between these two functions.
    From the Buddhist perspective, the cognitive and purposive sides of the
    mind do not remain isolated in separate compartments but intertwine and
    interact in close correlation. Emotional predilections influence views,
    and views determine predilections. Thus
    a penetrating view of the nature of existence, gained through deep
    reflection and validated through investigation, brings with it a
    restructuring of values which sets the mind moving towards goals
    commensurate with the new vision. The application of mind needed
    to achieve those goals is what is meant by right intention.
    The Buddha explains right intention as threefold: the
    intention of renunciation, the intention of good will, and the intention
    of harmlessness.14 The three are opposed to three parallel kinds of
    wrong intention: intention governed by desire,
    intention governed by ill will, and intention governed by harmfulness.15
    Each kind of right intention counters the corresponding kind of wrong
    intention. The intention of renunciation counters the intention of
    desire, the intention of good will counters the
    intention of ill will, and the intention of harmlessness counters the
    intention of harmfulness.
    The Buddha discovered this twofold division of thought
    in the period prior to his Enlightenment (see MN 19). While he was
    striving for deliverance, meditating in the forest, he found that his
    thoughts could be distributed into two different
    classes. In one he put thoughts of desire, ill will, and harmfulness, in
    the other thoughts of renunciation, good will, and harmlessness.
    Whenever he noticed thoughts of the first kind arise in him, he
    understood that those thoughts lead to harm for oneself
    and others, obstruct wisdom, and lead away from Nibbana. Reflecting in
    this way he expelled such thoughts from his mind and brought them to an
    end. But whenever thoughts of the second kind arose, he understood those
    thoughts to be beneficial, conducive to
    the growth of wisdom, aids to the attainment of Nibbana. Thus he
    strengthened those thoughts and brought them to completion.
    Right intention claims the second place in the path,
    between right view and the triad of moral factors that begins with right
    speech, because the mind’s intentional function forms the crucial link
    connecting our cognitive perspective with our
    modes of active engagement in the world. On the one side actions always
    point back to the thoughts from which they spring. Thought is the
    forerunner of action, directing body and speech, stirring them into
    activity, using them as its instruments for expressing
    its aims and ideals. These aims and ideals, our intentions, in turn
    point back a further step to the prevailing views. When wrong views
    prevail, the outcome is wrong intention giving rise to unwholesome
    actions. Thus one who denies the moral efficacy of action
    and measures achievement in terms of gain and status will aspire to
    nothing but gain and status, using whatever means he can to acquire
    them. When such pursuits become widespread, the result is suffering, the
    tremendous suffering of individuals, social groups,
    and nations out to gain wealth, position, and power without regard for
    consequences. The cause for the endless competition, conflict,
    injustice, and oppression does not lie outside the mind. These are all
    just manifestations of intentions, outcroppings of
    thoughts driven by greed, by hatred, by delusion.
    But when the intentions are right, the actions will be
    right, and for the intentions to be right the surest guarantee is right
    views. One who recognizes the law of kamma, that actions bring
    retributive consequences, will frame his pursuits to
    accord with this law; thus his actions, expressive of his intentions,
    will conform to the canons of right conduct. The Buddha succinctly sums
    up the matter when he says that for a person who holds a wrong view, his
    deeds, words, plans, and purposes grounded
    in that view will lead to suffering, while for a person who holds right
    view, his deeds, words, plans, and purposes grounded in that view will
    lead to happiness.16
    Since the most important formulation of right view is
    the understanding of the Four Noble Truths, it follows that this view
    should be in some way determinative of the content of right intention.
    This we find to be in fact the case. Understanding
    the four truths in relation to one’s own life gives rise to the
    intention of renunciation; understanding them in relation to other
    beings gives rise to the other two right intentions. When we see how our
    own lives are pervaded by dukkha, and how this dukkha
    derives from craving, the mind inclines to renunciation — to abandoning
    craving and the objects to which it binds us. Then, when we apply the
    truths in an analogous way to other living beings, the contemplation
    nurtures the growth of good will and harmlessness.
    We see that, like ourselves, all other living beings want to be happy,
    and again that like ourselves they are subject to suffering. The
    consideration that all beings seek happiness causes thoughts of good
    will to arise — the loving wish that they be well,
    happy, and peaceful. The consideration that beings are exposed to
    suffering causes thoughts of harmlessness to arise — the compassionate
    wish that they be free from suffering.
    The moment the cultivation of the Noble Eightfold Path
    begins, the factors of right view and right intention together start to
    counteract the three unwholesome roots. Delusion, the primary cognitive
    defilement, is opposed by right view, the
    nascent seed of wisdom. The complete eradication of delusion will only
    take place when right view is developed to the stage of full
    realization, but every flickering of correct understanding contributes
    to its eventual destruction. The other two roots, being
    emotive defilements, require opposition through the redirecting of
    intention, and thus meet their antidotes in thoughts of renunciation,
    good will, and harmlessness.
    Since greed and aversion are deeply grounded, they do
    not yield easily; however, the work of overcoming them is not impossible
    if an effective strategy is employed. The path devised by the Buddha
    makes use of an indirect approach: it proceeds
    by tackling the thoughts to which these defilements give rise. Greed and
    aversion surface in the form of thoughts, and thus can be eroded by a
    process of “thought substitution,” by replacing them with the thoughts
    opposed to them. The intention of renunciation
    provides the remedy to greed. Greed comes to manifestation in thoughts
    of desire — as sensual, acquisitive, and possessive thoughts. Thoughts
    of renunciation spring from the wholesome root of non-greed, which they
    activate whenever they are cultivated. Since
    contrary thoughts cannot coexist, when thoughts of renunciation are
    roused, they dislodge thoughts of desire, thus causing non-greed to
    replace greed. Similarly, the intentions of good will and harmlessness
    offer the antidote to aversion. Aversion comes to
    manifestation either in thoughts of ill will — as angry, hostile, or
    resentful thoughts; or in thoughts of harming — as the impulses to
    cruelty, aggression, and destruction. Thoughts of good will counter the
    former outflow of aversion, thoughts of harmlessness
    the latter outflow, in this way excising the unwholesome root of
    aversion itself.
    The Intention of Renunciation
    The Buddha describes his teaching as running contrary to
    the way of the world. The way of the world is the way of desire, and
    the unenlightened who follow this way flow with the current of desire,
    seeking happiness by pursuing the objects in
    which they imagine they will find fulfillment. The Buddha’s message of
    renunciation states exactly the opposite: the pull of desire is to be
    resisted and eventually abandoned. Desire is to be abandoned not because
    it is morally evil but because it is a root
    of suffering.17 Thus renunciation, turning away from craving and its
    drive for gratification, becomes the key to happiness, to freedom from
    the hold of attachment.
    The Buddha does not demand that everyone leave the
    household life for the monastery or ask his followers to discard all
    sense enjoyments on the spot. The degree to which a person renounces
    depends on his or her disposition and situation. But
    what remains as a guiding principle is this: that the attainment of
    deliverance requires the complete eradication of craving, and progress
    along the path is accelerated to the extent that one overcomes craving.
    Breaking free from domination by desire may not
    be easy, but the difficulty does not abrogate the necessity. Since
    craving is the origin of dukkha, putting an end to dukkha depends on
    eliminating craving, and that involves directing the mind to
    renunciation.
    But it is just at this point, when one tries to let go
    of attachment, that one encounters a powerful inner resistance. The mind
    does not want to relinquish its hold on the objects to which it has
    become attached. For such a long time it has
    been accustomed to gaining, grasping, and holding, that it seems
    impossible to break these habits by an act of will. One might agree to
    the need for renunciation, might want to leave attachment behind, but
    when the call is actually sounded the mind recoils
    and continues to move in the grip of its desires.
    So the problem arises of how to break the shackles of
    desire. The Buddha does not offer as a solution the method of repression
    — the attempt to drive desire away with a mind full of fear and
    loathing. This approach does not resolve the problem
    but only pushes it below the surface, where it continues to thrive. The
    tool the Buddha holds out to free the mind from desire is understanding.
    Real renunciation is not a matter of compelling ourselves to give up
    things still inwardly cherished, but of changing
    our perspective on them so that they no longer bind us. When we
    understand the nature of desire, when we investigate it closely with
    keen attention, desire falls away by itself, without need for struggle.
    To understand desire in such a way that we can loosen
    its hold, we need to see that desire is invariably bound up with dukkha.
    The whole phenomenon of desire, with its cycle of wanting and
    gratification, hangs on our way of seeing things. We
    remain in bondage to desire because we see it as our means to happiness.
    If we can look at desire from a different angle, its force will be
    abated, resulting in the move towards renunciation. What is needed to
    alter perception is something called “wise consideration”
    (yoniso manasikara). Just as perception influences thought, so thought
    can influence perception. Our usual perceptions are tinged with “unwise
    consideration” (ayoniso manasikara). We ordinarily look only at the
    surfaces of things, scan them in terms of our
    immediate interests and wants; only rarely do we dig into the roots of
    our involvements or explore their long-range consequences. To set this
    straight calls for wise consideration: looking into the hidden
    undertones to our actions, exploring their results,
    evaluating the worthiness of our goals. In this investigation our
    concern must not be with what is pleasant but with what is true. We have
    to be prepared and willing to discover what is true even at the cost of
    our comfort. For real security always lies on
    the side of truth, not on the side of comfort.
    When desire is scrutinized closely, we find that it is
    constantly shadowed by dukkha. Sometimes dukkha appears as pain or
    irritation; often it lies low as a constant strain of discontent. But
    the two — desire and dukkha — are inseparable concomitants.
    We can confirm this for ourselves by considering the whole cycle of
    desire. At the moment desire springs up it creates in us a sense of
    lack, the pain of want. To end this pain we struggle to fulfill the
    desire. If our effort fails, we experience frustration,
    disappointment, sometimes despair. But even the pleasure of success is
    not unqualified. We worry that we might lose the ground we have gained.
    We feel driven to secure our position, to safeguard our territory, to
    gain more, to rise higher, to establish tighter
    controls. The demands of desire seem endless, and each desire demands
    the eternal: it wants the things we get to last forever. But all the
    objects of desire are impermanent. Whether it be wealth, power,
    position, or other persons, separation is inevitable,
    and the pain that accompanies separation is proportional to the force of
    attachment: strong attachment brings much suffering; little attachment
    brings little suffering; no attachment brings no suffering.18
    Contemplating the dukkha inherent in desire is one way
    to incline the mind to renunciation. Another way is to contemplate
    directly the benefits flowing from renunciation. To move from desire to
    renunciation is not, as might be imagined, to move
    from happiness to grief, from abundance to destitution. It is to pass
    from gross, entangling pleasures to an exalted happiness and peace, from
    a condition of servitude to one of self-mastery. Desire ultimately
    breeds fear and sorrow, but renunciation gives
    fearlessness and joy. It promotes the accomplishment of all three stages
    of the threefold training: it purifies conduct, aids concentration, and
    nourishes the seed of wisdom. The entire course of practice from start
    to finish can in fact be seen as an evolving
    process of renunciation culminating in Nibbana as the ultimate stage of
    relinquishment, “the relinquishing of all foundations of existence”
    (sabb’upadhipatinissagga).
    When we methodically contemplate the dangers of desire
    and the benefits of renunciation, gradually we steer our mind away from
    the domination of desire. Attachments are shed like the leaves of a
    tree, naturally and spontaneously. The changes
    do not come suddenly, but when there is persistent practice, there is no
    doubt that they will come. Through repeated contemplation one thought
    knocks away another, the intention of renunciation dislodges the
    intention of desire.
    The Intention of Good Will
    The intention of good will opposes the intention of ill
    will, thoughts governed by anger and aversion. As in the case of desire,
    there are two ineffective ways of handling ill will. One is to yield to
    it, to express the aversion by bodily or
    verbal action. This approach releases the tension, helps drive the anger
    “out of one’s system,” but it also poses certain dangers. It breeds
    resentment, provokes retaliation, creates enemies, poisons
    relationships, and generates unwholesome kamma; in the end,
    the ill will does not leave the “system” after all, but instead is
    driven down to a deeper level where it continues to vitiate one’s
    thoughts and conduct. The other approach, repression, also fails to
    dispel the destructive force of ill will. It merely turns
    that force around and pushes it inward, where it becomes transmogrified
    into self-contempt, chronic depression, or a tendency to irrational
    outbursts of violence.
    The remedy the Buddha recommends to counteract ill will,
    especially when the object is another person, is a quality called in
    Pali metta. This word derives from another word meaning “friend,” but
    metta signifies much more than ordinary friendliness.
    I prefer to translate it by the compound “loving-kindness,” which best
    captures the intended sense: an intense feeling of selfless love for
    other beings radiating outwards as a heartfelt concern for their
    well-being and happiness. Metta is not just sentimental
    good will, nor is it a conscientious response to a moral imperative or
    divine command. It must become a deep inner feeling, characterized by
    spontaneous warmth rather than by a sense of obligation. At its peak
    metta rises to the heights of a brahmavihara,
    a “divine dwelling,” a total way of being centered on the radiant wish
    for the welfare of all living beings.
    The kind of love implied by metta should be
    distinguished from sensual love as well as from the love involved in
    personal affection. The first is a form of craving, necessarily
    self-directed, while the second still includes a degree of attachment:
    we love a person because that person gives us pleasure, belongs to our
    family or group, or reinforces our own self-image. Only rarely does the
    feeling of affection transcend all traces of ego-reference, and even
    then its scope is limited. It applies only to
    a certain person or group of people while excluding others.
    The love involved in metta, in contrast, does not hinge
    on particular relations to particular persons. Here the reference point
    of self is utterly omitted. We are concerned only with suffusing others
    with a mind of loving-kindness, which ideally
    is to be developed into a universal state, extended to all living beings
    without discriminations or reservations. The way to impart to metta
    this universal scope is to cultivate it as an exercise in meditation.
    Spontaneous feelings of good will occur too sporadically
    and are too limited in range to be relied on as the remedy for aversion.
    The idea of deliberately developing love has been criticized as
    contrived, mechanical, and calculated. Love, it is said, can only be
    genuine when it is spontaneous, arisen without inner
    prompting or effort. But it is a Buddhist thesis that the mind cannot be
    commanded to love spontaneously; it can only be shown the means to
    develop love and enjoined to practice accordingly. At first the means
    has to be employed with some deliberation, but
    through practice the feeling of love becomes ingrained, grafted onto the
    mind as a natural and spontaneous tendency.
    The method of development is metta-bhavana, the
    meditation on loving-kindness, one of the most important kinds of
    Buddhist meditation. The meditation begins with the development of
    loving-kindness towards oneself.19 It is suggested that one
    take oneself as the first object of metta because true loving-kindness
    for others only becomes possible when one is able to feel genuine
    loving-kindness for oneself. Probably most of the anger and hostility we
    direct to others springs from negative attitudes
    we hold towards ourselves. When metta is directed inwards towards
    oneself, it helps to melt down the hardened crust created by these
    negative attitudes, permitting a fluid diffusion of kindness and
    sympathy outwards.
    Once one has learned to kindle the feeling of metta
    towards oneself, the next step is to extend it to others. The extension
    of metta hinges on a shift in the sense of identity, on expanding the
    sense of identity beyond its ordinary confines
    and learning to identify with others. The shift is purely psychological
    in method, entirely free from theological and metaphysical postulates,
    such as that of a universal self immanent in all beings. Instead, it
    proceeds from a simple, straightforward course
    of reflection which enables us to share the subjectivity of others and
    experience the world (at least imaginatively) from the standpoint of
    their own inwardness. The procedure starts with oneself. If we look into
    our own mind, we find that the basic urge of
    our being is the wish to be happy and free from suffering. Now, as soon
    as we see this in ourselves, we can immediately understand that all
    living beings share the same basic wish. All want to be well, happy, and
    secure. To develop metta towards others, what
    is to be done is to imaginatively share their own innate wish for
    happiness. We use our own desire for happiness as the key, experience
    this desire as the basic urge of others, then come back to our own
    position and extend to them the wish that they may achieve
    their ultimate objective, that they may be well and happy.
    The methodical radiation of metta is practiced first by
    directing metta to individuals representing certain groups. These groups
    are set in an order of progressive remoteness from oneself. The
    radiation begins with a dear person, such as a parent
    or teacher, then moves on to a friend, then to a neutral person, then
    finally to a hostile person. Though the types are defined by their
    relation to oneself, the love to be developed is not based on that
    relation but on each person’s common aspiration for
    happiness. With each individual one has to bring his (or her) image into
    focus and radiate the thought: “May he (she) be well! May he (she) be
    happy! May he (she) be peaceful!”20 Only when one succeeds in generating
    a warm feeling of good will and kindness
    towards that person should one turn to the next. Once one gains some
    success with individuals, one can then work with larger units. One can
    try developing metta towards all friends, all neutral persons, all
    hostile persons. Then metta can be widened by directional
    suffusion, proceeding in the various directions — east, south, west,
    north, above, below — then it can be extended to all beings without
    distinction. In the end one suffuses the entire world with a mind of
    loving-kindness “vast, sublime, and immeasurable,
    without enmity, without aversion.”
    The Intention of Harmlessness
    The intention of harmlessness is thought guided by
    compassion (karuna), aroused in opposition to cruel, aggressive, and
    violent thoughts. Compassion supplies the complement to loving-kindness.
    Whereas loving-kindness has the characteristic of
    wishing for the happiness and welfare of others, compassion has the
    characteristic of wishing that others be free from suffering, a wish to
    be extended without limits to all living beings. Like metta, compassion
    arises by entering into the subjectivity of
    others, by sharing their interiority in a deep and total way. It springs
    up by considering that all beings, like ourselves, wish to be free from
    suffering, yet despite their wishes continue to be harassed by pain,
    fear, sorrow, and other forms of dukkha.
    To develop compassion as a meditative exercise, it is
    most effective to start with somebody who is actually undergoing
    suffering, since this provides the natural object for compassion. One
    contemplates this person’s suffering, either directly
    or imaginatively, then reflects that like oneself, he (she) also wants
    to be free from suffering. The thought should be repeated, and
    contemplation continually exercised, until a strong feeling of
    compassion swells up in the heart. Then, using that feeling
    as a standard, one turns to different individuals, considers how they
    are each exposed to suffering, and radiates the gentle feeling of
    compassion out to them. To increase the breadth and intensity of
    compassion it is helpful to contemplate the various sufferings
    to which living beings are susceptible. A useful guideline to this
    extension is provided by the first noble truth, with its enumeration of
    the different aspects of dukkha. One contemplates beings as subject to
    old age, then as subject to sickness, then to
    death, then to sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, and despair, and so
    forth.
    When a high level of success has been achieved in
    generating compassion by the contemplation of beings who are directly
    afflicted by suffering, one can then move on to consider people who are
    presently enjoying happiness which they have acquired
    by immoral means. One might reflect that such people, despite their
    superficial fortune, are doubtlessly troubled deep within by the pangs
    of conscience. Even if they display no outward signs of inner distress,
    one knows that they will eventually reap the
    bitter fruits of their evil deeds, which will bring them intense
    suffering. Finally, one can widen the scope of one’s contemplation to
    include all living beings. One should contemplate all beings as subject
    to the universal suffering of samsara, driven by
    their greed, aversion, and delusion through the round of repeated birth
    and death. If compassion is initially difficult to arouse towards beings
    who are total strangers, one can strengthen it by reflecting on the
    Buddha’s dictum that in this beginningless
    cycle of rebirths, it is hard to find even a single being who has not at
    some time been one’s own mother or father, sister or brother, son or
    daughter.
    To sum up, we see that the three kinds of right
    intention — of renunciation, good will, and harmlessness — counteract
    the three wrong intentions of desire, ill will, and harmfulness. The
    importance of putting into practice the contemplations
    leading to the arising of these thoughts cannot be overemphasized. The
    contemplations have been taught as methods for cultivation, not mere
    theoretical excursions. To develop the intention of renunciation we have
    to contemplate the suffering tied up with the
    quest for worldly enjoyment; to develop the intention of good will we
    have to consider how all beings desire happiness; to develop the
    intention of harmlessness we have to consider how all beings wish to be
    free from suffering. The unwholesome thought is like
    a rotten peg lodged in the mind; the wholesome thought is like a new peg
    suitable to replace it. The actual contemplation functions as the
    hammer used to drive out the old peg with the new one. The work of
    driving in the new peg is practice — practicing again
    and again, as often as is necessary to reach success. The Buddha gives
    us his assurance that the victory can be achieved. He says that whatever
    one reflects upon frequently becomes the inclination of the mind. If
    one frequently thinks sensual, hostile, or
    harmful thoughts, desire, ill will, and harmfulness become the
    inclination of the mind. If one frequently thinks in the opposite way,
    renunciation, good will, and harmlessness become the inclination of the
    mind (MN 19). The direction we take always comes back
    to ourselves, to the intentions we generate moment by moment in the
    course of our lives.
    Chapter IV [go up]
    Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood
    (Samma Vaca, Samma Kammanta, Samma Ajiva)
    The next three path factors — right speech, right
    action, and right livelihood — may be treated together, as collectively
    they make up the first of the three divisions of the path, the division
    of moral discipline (silakkhandha). Though the
    principles laid down in this section restrain immoral actions and
    promote good conduct, their ultimate purpose is not so much ethical as
    spiritual. They are not prescribed merely as guides to action, but
    primarily as aids to mental purification. As a necessary
    measure for human well-being, ethics has its own justification in the
    Buddha’s teaching and its importance cannot be underrated. But in the
    special context of the Noble Eightfold Path ethical principles are
    subordinate to the path’s governing goal, final deliverance
    from suffering. Thus for the moral training to become a proper part of
    the path, it has to be taken up under the tutelage of the first two
    factors, right view and right intention, and to lead beyond to the
    trainings in concentration and wisdom.
    Though the training in moral discipline is listed first
    among the three groups of practices, it should not be regarded lightly.
    It is the foundation for the entire path, essential for the success of
    the other trainings. The Buddha himself frequently
    urged his disciples to adhere to the rules of discipline, “seeing danger
    in the slightest fault.” One time, when a monk approached the Buddha
    and asked for the training in brief, the Buddha told him: “First
    establish yourself in the starting point of wholesome
    states, that is, in purified moral discipline and in right view. Then,
    when your moral discipline is purified and your view straight, you
    should practice the four foundations of mindfulness” (SN 47:3).
    The Pali word we have been translating as “moral
    discipline,” sila, appears in the texts with several overlapping
    meanings all connected with right conduct. In some contexts it means
    action conforming to moral principles, in others the principles
    themselves, in still others the virtuous qualities of character that
    result from the observance of moral principles. Sila in the sense of
    precepts or principles represents the formalistic side of the ethical
    training, sila as virtue the animating spirit, and
    sila as right conduct the expression of virtue in real-life situations.
    Often sila is formally defined as abstinence from unwholesome bodily and
    verbal action. This definition, with its stress on outer action,
    appears superficial. Other explanations, however,
    make up for the deficiency and reveal that there is more to sila than is
    evident at first glance. The Abhidhamma, for example, equates sila with
    the mental factors of abstinence (viratiyo) — right speech, right
    action, and right livelihood — an equation which
    makes it clear that what is really being cultivated through the
    observance of moral precepts is the mind. Thus while the training in
    sila brings the “public” benefit of inhibiting socially detrimental
    actions, it entails the personal benefit of mental purification,
    preventing the defilements from dictating to us what lines of conduct we
    should follow.
    The English word “morality” and its derivatives suggest a
    sense of obligation and constraint quite foreign to the Buddhist
    conception of sila; this connotation probably enters from the theistic
    background to Western ethics. Buddhism, with its
    non-theistic framework, grounds its ethics, not on the notion of
    obedience, but on that of harmony. In fact, the commentaries explain the
    word sila by another word, samadhana, meaning “harmony” or
    “coordination.”
    The observance of sila leads to harmony at several
    levels — social, psychological, kammic, and contemplative. At the social
    level the principles of sila help to establish harmonious interpersonal
    relations, welding the mass of differently constituted
    members of society with their own private interests and goals into a
    cohesive social order in which conflict, if not utterly eliminated, is
    at least reduced. At the psychological level sila brings harmony to the
    mind, protection from the inner split caused
    by guilt and remorse over moral transgressions. At the kammic level the
    observance of sila ensures harmony with the cosmic law of kamma, hence
    favorable results in the course of future movement through the round of
    repeated birth and death. And at the fourth
    level, the contemplative, sila helps establish the preliminary
    purification of mind to be completed, in a deeper and more thorough way,
    by the methodical development of serenity and insight.
    When briefly defined, the factors of moral training are
    usually worded negatively, in terms of abstinence. But there is more to
    sila than refraining from what is wrong. Each principle embedded in the
    precepts, as we will see, actually has two
    aspects, both essential to the training as a whole. One is abstinence
    from the unwholesome, the other commitment to the wholesome; the former
    is called “avoidance” (varitta) and the latter “performance” (caritta).
    At the outset of training the Buddha stresses
    the aspect of avoidance. He does so, not because abstinence from the
    unwholesome is sufficient in itself, but to establish the steps of
    practice in proper sequence. The steps are set out in their natural
    order (more logical than temporal) in the famous dictum
    of the Dhammapada: “To abstain from all evil, to cultivate the good, and
    to purify one’s mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas” (v. 183).
    The other two steps — cultivating the good and purifying the mind — also
    receive their due, but to ensure their success,
    a resolve to avoid the unwholesome is a necessity. Without such a
    resolve the attempt to develop wholesome qualities is bound to issue in a
    warped and stunted pattern of growth.
    The training in moral discipline governs the two
    principal channels of outer action, speech and body, as well as another
    area of vital concern — one’s way of earning a living. Thus the training
    contains three factors: right speech, right action,
    and right livelihood. These we will now examine individually, following
    the order in which they are set forth in the usual exposition of the
    path.thical Conduct

    comments (0)