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04 LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007- (2656 Tue 19 Jun LESSON) Buddha’s Birthday List of Buddhist temples
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 10:44 pm
 04 LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007-  (2656 Tue 19 Jun  LESSON)

Buddha’s Birthday

List of Buddhist temples


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http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105
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https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Buddha%27s+Birthday

Buddha’s Birthday



Buddha’s Birthday is a holiday traditionally celebrated in most of East Asia to commemorate the birth of the Prince Siddhartha Gautama, later the Gautama Buddha and founder of Buddhism. It is also celebrated in South and Southeast Asia as Vesak which also acknowledges the enlightenment and death of the Buddha. According to the Theravada Tripitaka scriptures (from Pali, meaning “three baskets”), Gautama was born in Lumbini in modern-day Nepal, in the year 563 B.C., according to the Nepalese Account, and raised in Kapilavastu.[2][3] At the age of thirty five, he attained enlightenment (nirvana) underneath a Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya (modern day India). He delivered his first sermon at Sarnath, India. At the age of eighty, He died at Kushinagar, India.[4]

The exact date of Buddha’s Birthday is based on the Asian lunisolar calendars.
The date for the celebration of Buddha’s Birthday varies from year to
year in the Western Gregorian calendar, but usually falls in April or
May. In leap years it may be celebrated in June.

Date

The exact date of Buddha’s Birthday is based on the Asian lunisolar calendars and is primarily celebrated in Baisakh month of the Buddhist calendar and the Bikram Sambat Hindu calendar, and hence it is also called Vesak. In modern-day India and Nepal, where the Historical Buddha lived, it is celebrated on the full moon day of the Vaisakha
month of the Buddhist calendar. In Theravada countries following the
Buddhist calendar, it falls on a full moon Uposatha day, typically in
the 5th or 6th lunar month. In China and Korea, it is celebrated on the
eighth day of the fourth month in the Chinese lunar calendar. The date
varies from year to year in the Western Gregorian calendar, but usually
falls in April or May. In leap years it may be celebrated in June. In
Tibet, it falls on the 7th day of the fourth month of the Tibetan
calendar (in May).

South and Southeast Asia and Mongolia

In South Asian and Southeast Asian countries as well as Mongolia, Buddha’s birthday is celebrated on the full moon day of the Vaisakha month of the Buddhist calendar and the Hindu calendar,
which usually falls in April or May month of the Western Gregorian
calendar. The festival is known as Buddha Purnima, as Purnima means full
moon day in Sanskrit. It is also called is Buddha Jayanti, with Jayanti
meaning birthday in Sanskrit Language.

The corresponding Western Gregorian calendar dates varies from year to year:


  • 2017: May 10
  • 2018:
    April 29 (Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Myanmar, Bangladesh), April 30 (Nepal,
    India), May 29 (Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia)[5]
  • 2019: May 19
East Asia

In many East Asian countries Buddha’s Birth is celebrated on the 8th day of the 4th month in the Chinese lunar calendar (in Japan since 1873 on April 8 of the Gregorian calendar), and the day is an official holiday in Hong Kong, Macau and South Korea. The date falls from the end of April to the end of May in the Gregorian calendar.

The primarily solar Gregorian calendar date varies from year to year:


  • 2017: May 3
  • 2018: May 22
  • 2019: May 12
  • 2020: April 30
Taiwan

In 1999 the Taiwanese government set Buddha’s birthday as the second Sunday of May, the same date as Mother’s Day.[6][7]

Japan

As a result of the Meiji Restoration,
Japan adopted the Gregorian calendar in lieu of the Chinese lunar
calendar in 1873. However, it took approximately until 1945, the end of World War II,
for religious festivities to adopt the new calendar. In most Japanese
temples, Buddha’s birth is now celebrated on the Gregorian calendar date
April 8; only a few (mainly in Okinawa) celebrate it on the orthodox
Chinese calendar date of the eighth day of the fourth lunar month.

Celebrations in each country Asia


Lotus Lantern Festival celebrating Buddha’s Birthday, in South Korea



Floating lanterns on a lake for Buddha’s Birthday in Jaffna, Sri Lanka
Bangladesh

In
Bangladesh the event is called বুদ্ধ পূর্ণিমা or Buddho Purnima. On the
day of proceeding Purnima Buddhist monks and priests decorate temple in
colourful decorations and candles. On the day of the festival the
President and Prime Minister deliver speeches about the history and
importance of Buddhism and religious harmony in the country. From noon
onwards large fairs are held in and around temples and viharas
selling bangles, food (largely vegetarian), clothes, toys and
conducting performances of Buddha’s life, Buddhist music teaching about
the Dharma and the 5 precepts. Later on Buddhists attend a congression
inside the monastery where the chief monk would deliver a speech
discussing the Buddha and the 3 jewels and about living the ideal life
after which a prayer to the buddha would be conducted and people would
then light candles and recite the three jewels and 5 precepts.[8][9]

Cambodia

In Cambodia, Buddha’s Birthday is celebrated as Visak Bochea and is a public holiday
where monks around the country carry flags, lotus flowers, incense and
candles to acknowledge Vesak. People also take part in alms giving to
the monks.[10]

China

In China, celebrations often occur in Buddhist temples where people light incense and bring food offerings for the monks.[11] In Hong Kong, Buddha’s birthday is a public holiday.
Lanterns are lit to symbolise the Buddha’s enlightenment and many
people visit the temple to pay their respects. The bathing of the Buddha
is a major feature of Buddha’s birthday celebrations in the city.[12] The festival is also a public holiday in Macau.[13]

India

India
is the land where the Buddha attained enlightenment (nirvana) at
Bodhgaya and established Buddhism. Buddha spent majority of his life in
what is now modern day India. Some of the holiest sites associated with
Buddha’s life include Bodhgaya (place of enlightenment), Sarnath (site of first sermon), Sravasti and Rajgir (site where Buddha spent the greater part of his monastic life and delivered majority of his discourses), and Kushinagar (site where Buddha attained Parinirvana and passed away)[14][15] Under Emperor Ashoka, Buddhism spread from India to other nations.[4] Buddha Purnima or Buddha Jayanthi in South India or Tathagata is a public holiday in India.The public holiday for Buddha purnima in India was initiated by Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar when he was the minister of social justice [16] It is celebrated especially in Sikkim, Ladakh, Arunachal Pradesh, Bodh Gaya, various parts of North Bengal such as Kalimpong, Darjeeling, and Kurseong, and Maharashtra (where 73% of total Indian Buddhists live) and other parts of India as per Indian calendar. Buddhists go to common Viharas to observe a rather longer-than-usual, full-length Buddhist sutra, akin to a service. The dress code is pure white. Non-vegetarian food is normally avoided. Kheer,
a sweet rice porridge is commonly served to recall the story of Sujata,
a maiden who, in Gautama Buddha’s life, offered the Buddha a bowl of
milk porridge.
Informally called “Buddha’s Birthday”, it actually commemorates the
birth, enlightenment (nirvāna), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama
Buddha in the Theravada tradition. Tibetans in exile remember Buddha’s
birthday on the 7th day of the Saga Dawa month (fourth month of the
Tibetan calendar), which culminates with Buddha’s parinirvana
celebrations on the full moon day.

It is said that the Buddha originally followed the way of asceticism
to attain enlightenment sooner, as was thought by many at that time. He
sat for a prolonged time with inadequate food and water, which caused
his body to shrivel so as to be indistinguishable from the bark of the
tree that he was sitting under. Seeing the weak Siddhartha Gautama, a
woman named Sujata placed a bowl of “Kheer” in front of him as an
offering.[17] Realizing that without food one can do
nothing, the Buddha refrained from harming his own body. Thereafter, he
would go on to attain nirvana.

Indonesia

In Indonesia, Buddha’s Birthday is celebrated as Waisak and is a public holiday. A large procession beginning in Mendut in Java ends at Borobudur – the largest Buddhist temple in the world.[18][19]

Japan


H

https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=List+of+Buddhist+temples

List of Buddhist temples



Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya, India was the place of Buddha’s Enlightenment.



Ancient Buddhist monasteries near Dhamekh Stupa Monument Site at Sarnath, India where Buddha delivered his first teaching.



The Parinirvana Temple with the Parinirvana Stupa at Kushinagar, India where Buddha attained Parinirvana after his death

This is a list of Buddhist temples, monasteries, stupas, and pagodas for which there are Wikipedia articles, sorted by location.

AustraliaAustralian Capital Territory
New South Wales
Queensland
South Australia
Victoria
Western Australia
Bangladesh
Bhutan


Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest)
Bumthang
  • Kurjey Lhakhang - one of Bhutan’s most sacred temples - image of Guru Rinopche enshrined in rock.
Paro
  • Rinpung Dzong
  • Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) - perched on a 1,200 meter cliff, this is one of Bhutan’s most spectacular monasteries.
Punakha
Phobjika
Thimphu
Cambodia


Prasat Angkor Wat



Wat Preah Keo Morokot



Wat Phnom.
Angkor
Kampong Thom
Phnom Penh
Pursat
CanadaBritish Columbia


Monastère Bouddhiste de Tam Bao Son, Canton d’Harrington, Laurentides, Québec

Nova Scotia
Ontario
QuebecPeople’s Republic of China


The Tianning Pagoda in Beijing, built around 1120.



The Putuo Zongcheng Temple in Hebei, represents a fusion of Chinese and Tibetan architectural style.




Tianning Temple (Changzhou) in Jiangsu - the tallest pagoda and the tallest wooden structure in the world.[1]



Giant Wild Goose Pagoda, Xi’an, Shaanxi province.




Golden Temple (Chinese Buddhist) at the summit of Emei Shan, in Sichuan. Emei Shan is one of the Four Sacred Mountains of Chinese Buddhism.



The Three Pagodas of Chong Sheng Temple, Dali City, Yunnan.
Anhui
Beijing
Fujian
Guangdong
Hainan
Hebei
Henan
Hohhot
Hubei
Hong Kong
Jiangsu
Jiangxi
Ningxia
Quanzhou
Shaanxi
Shandong
Shanghai
Shanxi
Sichuan
comments (0)
04 LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007- (2656 Tue 19 Jun LESSON) Pagoda
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 6:39 pm

https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=List+of+Buddhist+temples

List of Buddhist temples



Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya, India was the place of Buddha’s Enlightenment.



Ancient Buddhist monasteries near Dhamekh Stupa Monument Site at Sarnath, India where Buddha delivered his first teaching.



The Parinirvana Temple with the Parinirvana Stupa at Kushinagar, India where Buddha attained Parinirvana after his death

This is a list of Buddhist temples, monasteries, stupas, and pagodas for which there are Wikipedia articles, sorted by location.

AustraliaAustralian Capital Territory
New South Wales
Queensland
South Australia
Victoria
Western Australia
Bangladesh
Bhutan


Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest)
Bumthang
  • Kurjey Lhakhang - one of Bhutan’s most sacred temples - image of Guru Rinopche enshrined in rock.
Paro
  • Rinpung Dzong
  • Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) - perched on a 1,200 meter cliff, this is one of Bhutan’s most spectacular monasteries.
Punakha
Phobjika
Thimphu
Cambodia


Prasat Angkor Wat



Wat Preah Keo Morokot



Wat Phnom.
Angkor
Kampong Thom
Phnom Penh
Pursat
CanadaBritish Columbia


Monastère Bouddhiste de Tam Bao Son, Canton d’Harrington, Laurentides, Québec

Nova Scotia
Ontario
QuebecPeople’s Republic of China


The Tianning Pagoda in Beijing, built around 1120.



The Putuo Zongcheng Temple in Hebei, represents a fusion of Chinese and Tibetan architectural style.




Tianning Temple (Changzhou) in Jiangsu - the tallest pagoda and the tallest wooden structure in the world.[1]



Giant Wild Goose Pagoda, Xi’an, Shaanxi province.




Golden Temple (Chinese Buddhist) at the summit of Emei Shan, in Sichuan. Emei Shan is one of the Four Sacred Mountains of Chinese Buddhism.



The Three Pagodas of Chong Sheng Temple, Dali City, Yunnan.
Anhui
Beijing
Fujian
Guangdong
Hainan
Hebei
Henan
Hohhot
Hubei
Hong Kong
Jiangsu
Jiangxi
Ningxia
Quanzhou
Shaanxi
Shandong
Shanghai
Shanxi
Sichuan
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=List+of+Buddhist+temples

List of Buddhist temples



Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya, India was the place of Buddha’s Enlightenment.



Ancient Buddhist monasteries near Dhamekh Stupa Monument Site at Sarnath, India where Buddha delivered his first teaching.



The Parinirvana Temple with the Parinirvana Stupa at Kushinagar, India where Buddha attained Parinirvana after his death

This is a list of Buddhist temples, monasteries, stupas, and pagodas for which there are Wikipedia articles, sorted by location.

AustraliaAustralian Capital Territory
New South Wales
Queensland
South Australia
Victoria
Western Australia
Bangladesh
Bhutan


Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest)
Bumthang
  • Kurjey Lhakhang - one of Bhutan’s most sacred temples - image of Guru Rinopche enshrined in rock.
Paro
  • Rinpung Dzong
  • Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) - perched on a 1,200 meter cliff, this is one of Bhutan’s most spectacular monasteries.
Punakha
Phobjika
Thimphu
Cambodia


Prasat Angkor Wat



Wat Preah Keo Morokot



Wat Phnom.
Angkor
Kampong Thom
Phnom Penh
Pursat
CanadaBritish Columbia


Monastère Bouddhiste de Tam Bao Son, Canton d’Harrington, Laurentides, Québec

Nova Scotia
Ontario
QuebecPeople’s Republic of China


The Tianning Pagoda in Beijing, built around 1120.



The Putuo Zongcheng Temple in Hebei, represents a fusion of Chinese and Tibetan architectural style.




Tianning Temple (Changzhou) in Jiangsu - the tallest pagoda and the tallest wooden structure in the world.[1]



Giant Wild Goose Pagoda, Xi’an, Shaanxi province.




Golden Temple (Chinese Buddhist) at the summit of Emei Shan, in Sichuan. Emei Shan is one of the Four Sacred Mountains of Chinese Buddhism.



The Three Pagodas of Chong Sheng Temple, Dali City, Yunnan.
Anhui
Beijing
Fujian
Guangdong
Hainan
Hebei
Henan
Hohhot
Hubei
Hong Kong
Jiangsu
Jiangxi
Ningxia
Quanzhou
Shaanxi
Shandong
Shanghai
Shanxi
Sichuan
Tibet Autonomous Region



The Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, Tibet.

Yunnan
Zhejiang
Europe


The Pagode de Vincennes, originally the Cameroon Pavilion of the 1931 Paris Colonial Exposition.




Das Buddhistische Haus in Berlin - the oldest Buddhist temple in Europe.



The main stupa at Samyé Ling monastery in Scotland

Denmark
England
France
Germany
Hungary
Italy
The Netherlands Poland
Scotland
Slovakia
  • Buddhist Temple of Dzogchen Community Wangdenling
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
IndiaAndhra Pradesh




Buddhist Monastery Remnants, Ramatheertham, Andhra Pradesh

Arunachal Pradesh
Bihar
Goa

Buddhist caves exist in following places in Goa:


Buddha
idols have been found in several places, and some temples, some are
still in worship and are considered now as Hindu gods. Monasteries used
to exist in many places, and it can be seen from the names of the modern
villages. For example, Viharas have been found in modern Divachali or ancient Dipakavishaya, Lamgaon or ancient Lamagrama and many other places.

Himachal Pradesh



Jammu and Kashmir
Karnataka
Kerala
Madhya Pradesh

Maharashtra


Deekshabhoomi, Buddhism revival place in India


Orissa


Dhauli, Orissa


Sikkim

Tamil Nadu
Uttar Pradesh
West Bengal
Indonesia




Candi Banyunibo located in a paddy field southeast of Ratu Boko
Sumatra
West Java
Central Java
East Java
Bali
Israel
Japan Fukui

Fukuoka
Gifu
Hiroshima
Hyōgo
Iwate
Kagawa


Zentsū-ji (Kūkai’s birthplace)

Kanagawa
Kyoto


Kinkaku-ji (Rinzai-Shōkoku-ji sect), the Temple of the Golden Pavilion, located in Kyoto. It was built in Muromachi period.


Miyagi
Nagano
Nagasaki
Nara


Tōdai-ji’s Daibutsu in Nara, Nara


Osaka
  • Shitennō-ji (the first Buddhist and oldest officially administered temple in Japan)
Saitama
Shiga


Konpon Chū-dō of Enryakuji in Ōtsu, Shiga

Shizuoka
Tochigi
Tokyo


Danjogaran of Mount Kōya

Sensō-ji (Temple complex)


Toyama
Wakayama


Danjogaran of Mount Kōya

Yamagata
Yamaguchi
Yamanashi
Laos


Pha That Luang
Vientiane
Luang Phrabang
Malaysia


Kek Lok Si Temple, Penang.



Sri Lanka Buddhist Temple (from Lorong Timur), Sentul, Kuala Lumpur



Puu Jih Shih Temple, Sandakan, Sabah.
Kuala Lumpur
Malacca
Penang
Kelantan
Perak
Pahang
Sabah
Mongolia


Golden Temple at Gandan Monastery in Ulan Bator.
Ulaanbaatar
Övörkhangai
Selenge
Myanmar


Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon - the most revered pagoda in Myanmar.



Ancient pagodas are built in the Mon style, Bagan.



Dhammayangyi Temple - a pyramid-shaped Buddhist temple.


Yangon Region
Yangon (Rangoon)

Mandalay Region
Bagan (Pagan)

Mandalay

Rakhine State
Bago Region
Bago

Pyay

Mon State
Shan State
Nepal



The Great Drigung Kagyud Lotus Stupa in Lumbini, Nepal
Kapilbastu District
Kathmandu District
Mustang District
Rupandehi District
  • Lumbini, birthplace of Siddhartha Gautama Buddha
New Zealand
PhilippinesDavao
Metro Manila
Russia
Singapore


Modern architecture of the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple and Museum in Singapore.

South Africa
South Korea Seoul

Gyeonggi
Gangwon

North Chungcheong
South Chungcheong
North Gyeongsang
South Gyeongsang

North Jeolla
North Pyeongan
South Jeolla
Daejeon
Sri Lanka





Dambulla Golden Cave Temple




Mahiyangana Dagoba
Ampara
Anuradhapura
Badulla
Balapitiya
Colombo
Dambulla
Hambantota
Jaffna
Kandy
Kalutara
Kelaniya
Kurunegala
Madampe
Mahiyanganaya
Matale
Polgahawela
Polonnaruwa
Trincomalee
Taiwan


Fo Guang Shan Buddha Memorial Center, Taiwan.

Tanzania
Thailand







Wat Traimit contains Golden Buddha - the world’s largest solid gold statue.


Ayutthaya
Bangkok
Chiang Mai
Chiang Rai





Content from Wikipedia Licensed under CC-BY-SA.

https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Pagoda


Pagoda



Bird’s eye view of the Patan Durbar Square’s pagoda temple of Nepal. It has been listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.


Great Wild Goose Pagoda of Xi’an in China, built in the 7th century, made of brick.


Seokgatap of Bulguksa
in South Korea, built in the 8th century, made of granite. In 1966, the
Mugujeonggwang Great Dharani Sutra, the oldest extant woodblock print
and several other treasures were found in the second story of this
pagoda.

A pagoda is a tiered tower with multiple eaves, built in traditions originating as stupa in historic South Asia[1][2] and further developed in East Asia or with respect to those traditions, common to Nepal, China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Myanmar, India, Sri Lanka and other parts of Asia. Some pagodas are used as Taoist houses of worship. Most pagodas were built to have a religious function, most commonly Buddhist, and were often located in or near viharas. In some countries, the term may refer to other religious structures. In Vietnam and Cambodia, due to French translation, the English term pagoda is a more generic term referring to a place of worship,
although pagoda is not an accurate word to describe a Buddhist vihara.
The modern pagoda is an evolution of the stupa which originated in ancient India.[3][4][1] Stupas are a tomb-like structure where sacred relics could be kept safe and venerated.[5]
The architectural structure of the stupa has spread across Asia, taking
on many diverse forms as details specific to different regions are
incorporated into the overall design.

Etymology

One proposed etymology is from a South Chinese pronunciation of the term for an eight-cornered tower, Chinese: 八角塔, and reinforced by the name of a famous pagoda encountered by many early European visitors to China, the “Pázhōu tǎ” (Chinese: 琶洲塔), standing just south of Guangzhou at Whampoa Anchorage.[6] Another proposed etymology is Persian butkada, from but, “idol” and kada, “temple, dwelling.”[7]

Another etymology, found in many English language dictionaries, is modern English pagoda from Portuguese (via Dravidian), from Sanskrit bhagavati, feminine of bhagavat, “blessed”, from bhag, “good fortune”.

Yet
another etymology of pagoda is from the Sinhala word dāgaba which is
derived from Sanskrit dhātugarbha or Pali dhātugabbha: “relic
womb/chamber” or “reliquary shrine”, i.e. a stupa, by way of Portuguese.[8]

History


Kek Lok Si pagoda tiers labelled with their architectural styles

The origin of the pagoda can be traced to the stupa (3rd century BCE).[9] The stupa, a dome shaped monument, was used as a commemorative monument associated with storing sacred relics.[9] In East Asia, the architecture of Chinese towers and Chinese pavilions
blended into pagoda architecture, eventually also spreading to
Southeast Asia. The pagoda’s original purpose was to house relics and
sacred writings.[10] This purpose was popularized due to the efforts of Buddhist missionaries, pilgrims, rulers, and ordinary devotees to seek out, distribute, and extol Buddhist relics.[11]

On the other side, the stupa emerged as a distinctive style of Newa architecture of Nepal and was adopted in Southeast and East Asia. Nepali architect Araniko visited China and shared his skills to build stupa buildings in China.[12][13]

These buildings (pagoda, stupa) became prominent as Buddhist monuments used for enshrining sacred relics.[9]

Symbolism

Chinese iconography is noticeable in Chinese pagoda as well as other East Asian pagoda architectures. The image of Gautama Buddha in the abhaya mudrā is also noticeable in some Pagodas. Buddhist iconography can be observed throughout the pagoda symbolism.[14]

In an article on Buddhist elements in Han dynasty art, Wu Hung suggests that in these tombs, Buddhist symbolism was so well-incorporated into native Chinese traditions that a unique system of symbolism had been developed.[15]

Architecture

Pagodas attract lightning strikes because of their height. Many pagodas have a decorated finial
at the top of the structure, and when made of metal, this finial,
sometimes referred to as a “demon-arrester”, can function as a lightning
rod. Also Pagodas come in many different sizes, as some may be small
and others may be large.[16]

Pagodas traditionally have an odd number of levels, a notable exception being the eighteenth century pagoda designed by Sir William Chambers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London.

The pagodas in Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia are very different from Chinese and Japanese pagodas. Pagodas in those countries are derived from Dravidian architecture.[17]

Some notable pagodas

Tiered towers with multiple eaves:

Stupas called “pagodas”:

Places called “pagoda” but which are not tiered structures with multiple eaves:

Structures that evoke pagoda architecture:

Structures not generally thought of as pagodas, but which have some pagoda-like characteristics:

See also
Notes
  1. “The Origin of Pagodas”. China.org.cn. 2002-09-19. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  2. “Pagoda”. Webpages.uidaho.edu. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  3. “DEVELOPMENT OF STUPA ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA” (PDF). Shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  4. “The stupa (article)”. Khan Academy. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  5. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Columbia University Press
  6. Chinese
    Origin of the Term Pagoda: Liang Sicheng’s Proposed Etymology Authors:
    David Robbins Tien, Gerald Leonard Cohen Publication: Arts, Languages
    and Philosophy Faculty Research & Creative Works DownloadTien, D.
    R., & Cohen, G. L. (2017) http://scholarsmine.mst.edu/artlan_phil_facwork. David Robbins Tien. Comments on Etymology, October 2014, Vol.44, no. 1, pp. 2–6.
  7. Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Second Edition. Random House, New York, 1993.
  8. Hobson-Jobson:
    The Anglo-Indian Dictionary by Henry Yule & Arthur Coke Burnell,
    first printed 1896, reprinted by Wordsworth Editions, 1996, p. 291.
    Online Etymology Dictionary by Douglas Harper, s.v. pagoda, at http://www.etymonline.com/ (Accessed 29 April 2016)
  9. Editors, The (2012-01-26). “pagoda | architecture”. Britannica.com. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  10. A World History of Architecture. Michael W. Fazio, Marian Moffett, Lawrence Wodehouse. Published 2003. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 0-07-141751-6.
  11. The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture. John Kieschnick. Published 2003. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-09676-7.
  12. “Nepal, China commemorate 57-year-long friendship - China News”. SINA English. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  13. The Evolution of Indian Stupa Architecture in East Asia. Eric Stratton. New Delhi, Vedams, 2002, viii, ISBN 81-7936-006-7
  14. The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture. John Kieschnick. Published 2003. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-09676-7. page 83
  15. The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture. John Kieschnick. Published 2003. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-09676-7. page 84
  16. Terry, T. Philip (1914). Terry’s Japanese Empire. Houghton Mifflin. p. 257.
  17. Chihara, Daigorō (1996). Hindu-Buddhist Architecture in Southeast Asia. BRILL. p. 28. ISBN 90-04-10512-3.
  18. [1]
References
  • The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture. John Kieschnick. Published 2003. Princeton University Press . ISBN 0-691-09676-7.
  • A World History of Architecture. Michael W. Fazio, Marian Moffett, Lawrence Wodehouse. Published 2003. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 0-07-141751-6.
  • Psycho-cosmic symbolism of the Buddhist stupa. A. B. Govinda. 1976, Emeryville, California. Dharma Publications.
External links

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https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=China+Pavilion+at+Epcot

China Pavilion at Epcot

The China Pavilion is a Chinese-themed pavilion that is part of the World Showcase within Epcot at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, United States. Its location is between the Norwegian and German pavilions.[1]

Layout

Visitors enter the China Pavilion through a large Chinese gate. The courtyard is dominated by a replica of the Temple of Heaven, which contains the entrance to “Reflections of China“,
a Circle-Vision 360° movie exploring China’s history and scenery, as
well as a museum containing several ancient Chinese artifacts. The
courtyard is bordered by shops selling Chinese merchandise, and two
Chinese restaurants.[2] The pavilion is decorated with ponds, crossed by bridges. Chinese acrobats also perform frequently in the pavilion.[3]

The pavilion served as the backdrop for the music video of the song “Reflection“, performed by a then-unknown Christina Aguilera, from the 1998 Disney film Mulan.[4]

Attractions and servicesAttractions

Shopping

  • Good Fortune Gifts, sells a variety of items including parasols, puppets, and toys.
  • House of Good Fortune, sells items such as housewares, tea sets, wall prints, silk robes, and porcelain goods.

Dining

  • Nine Dragons Restaurant, a full-service gourmet Chinese restaurant featuring traditional Chinese cuisine with a twist.
  • Lotus Blossom Cafe, a counter-service restaurant that serves well-known American-Chinese dishes.

Live entertainment

  • Dragon Legend Acrobats, a team of young acrobats who perform feats in the outdoor courtyard.

Character Meet & Greets

Gallery

References

  1. China in Epcot. All Ears. Accessed March 31, 2012.
  2. “360 Degrees of China”. Today at Disney. May 22, 2016. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  • China - Epcot World Showcase. WDW Info. Accessed March 31, 2012.
  • B, Erin (July 16, 2013). “Epcot World Showcase Best Kept Secrets – China”. Chip & Company. Retrieved December 29, 2017.

  • External links






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