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(16) LESSON Tue Jul 11 2007- (2668 Sun 1 Jul LESSON) 1-10 early to recent Chronology of Pali Canon TIPITAKA
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: @ 8:52 pm

  (16) LESSON Tue Jul  11  2007- (2668 Sun 1 Jul  LESSON) 

1-10 early to recent Chronology of Pali Canon

TIPITAKA

in 01) Classical Magahi Magadhi,
02) Classical Chandaso
language,

03)Magadhi Prakrit,
04) Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language),
05) Classical Pali,


06) Classical Deva Nagari,
07) Classical Afrikaans-- Klassieke Afrikaans
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25) Classical  Czech-Klasická čeština,
26) Classical  Danish-
Klassisk dansk,

27) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,

28) Classical English,



The Buddha’s first sermon after his awakenment

https://in.pinterest.com/pin/564005553303724624

From 560 B.C. to 400 B.C. Siddartha Guatame lived his life, the Four Noble Truths were revealed, the First Buddhist council was held and Buddhism reached Nepal.

https://in.pinterest.com/pin/564005553303729091/

The Eight Spoked Wheel and the Bodhi are the main symbols of Buddhism. The wheel symbolizes the turning of the truth and the law and the tree refers to the place where Buddha acheived enlightenment.

https://in.pinterest.com/pin/564005553303717821/


The eight fold path is the way that enlightenment may be reached. It is divided into 3 sections: wisdom, ethical conduct and mental discipline. The 4 noble truths tell of the truths of suffering and how to surpass it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_gBe7rO60I
Theravada Buddhist. “Pali with English Translation” Chanting.
Thai Forest Temple
Published on Apr 23, 2011
Created By Acariya Vassa.
Category
Nonprofits & Activism


http://www.suanmokkh-idh.org/talks/chanting-book-ver1-02.pdf
Pali ChaNting
Pali ChaNtingPali ChaNting
Pali ChaNting



Gautama Buddha
>
Quotes


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVKK-WVW2uw


The Awakenment Of The Buddha
TrueTube
Published on Feb 4, 2014
Why do we get old, get ill and die? How can we escape from suffering?
The story of how Prince Siddhartha Gautama left a life of luxury to
embark on a search for the answers, and how he eventually became the
Buddha — the Enlightened One. Animation by Ceiren Bell
Category
Education


youtube.com
Why
do we get old, get ill and die? How can we escape from suffering? The
story of how Prince Siddhartha Gautama left a life of luxury to embark
on a search …
https://www.thoughtco.com/the-four-noble-truths-450095

The Buddha’s first sermon after his awakenment centered on the Four Noble Truths, which are the foundation of Buddhism. The Truths are something like hypotheses and Buddhism might be defined as a process of verifying and realizing the truth of the Truths.

The Four Noble Truths

A common, sloppy rendering of the Truths tells us that life is
suffering; suffering is caused by greed; suffering ends when we stop
being greedy; the way to do that is to follow something called the
Eightfold Path.

In a more formal setting, the Truths read:

  1. The truth of suffering (dukkha)
  2. The truth of the cause of suffering (samudaya)
  3. The truth of the end of suffering (nirhodha)
  4. The truth of the path that frees us from suffering (magga)

Quite often, people get hung up on “life is suffering” and decide
Buddhism isn’t for them. However, if you take the time to appreciate
what the Four Noble Truths are really about, everything else about
Buddhism will be much clearer. Let’s look at them one at a time.

The First Noble Truth: Life Is Dukkha

The First Noble Truth is
often translated as “life is suffering.” This is not as dire as it
sounds, it’s actually quite the opposite, which is why can be confusing.

Much confusion is due to the English translation of the Pali/Sanskrit word dukkha
as “suffering.” According to the Ven. Ajahn Sumedho, a Theravadin monk
and scholar, the word actually means “incapable of satisfying” or “not
able to bear or withstand anything.” Other scholars replace “suffering”
with “stressful.”

Dukkha also refers to anything that is temporary,
conditional, or compounded of other things. Even something precious and
enjoyable is dukkha because it will end.

Further, the Buddha was not saying that everything about life is
relentlessly awful. In other sermons, he spoke of many types of
happiness, such as the happiness of family life. But as we look more
closely at dukkha, we see that it touches everything in our lives,
including good fortune and happy times.

Among other things, the Buddha taught that the skandhas
are dukkha. The skandhas are the components of a living human being:
form, senses, ideas, predilections, and consciousness. In other words,
the animated body you identify as yourself is dukkha because it is
impermanent and it will eventually perish.

The Second Noble Truth: On the Origin of Dukkha

The Second Noble Truth teaches that the cause of suffering is greed or desire. The actual word from the early scriptures is tanha, and this is more accurately translated as “thirst” or “craving.”

We continually search for something outside ourselves to make us
happy. But no matter how successful we are, we never remain satisfied.
The Second Truth is not telling us that we must give up everything we
love to find happiness. The real issue here is more subtle – it’s attachment to what we desire that gets us into trouble.

The Buddha taught that this thirst grows from ignorance of the self.
We go through life grabbing one thing after another to get a sense of
security about ourselves. We attach not only to physical things but also
to ideas and opinions about ourselves and the world around us. Then we
grow frustrated when the world doesn’t behave the way we think it should
and our lives don’t conform to our expectations.

Buddhist practice brings about a radical change in perspective. Our
tendency to divide the universe into “me” and “everything else” fades
away. In time, the practitioner is better able to enjoy life’s
experiences without judgment, bias, manipulation, or any of the other
mental barriers we erect between ourselves and what’s real.

The Buddha’s teachings on karma and rebirth are closely related to the Second Noble Truth.

The Third Noble Truth: The Cessation of Craving

The Buddha’s teachings on the Four Noble Truths are sometimes
compared to a physician diagnosing an illness and prescribing a
treatment. The first truth tells us what the illness is and the second
truth tells us what causes the illness. The Third Noble Truth holds out
hope for a cure.

The solution to dukkha is to stop clinging and attaching. But how do
we do that? The fact is that you can’t by an act of will. It’s
impossible to just vow to yourself, okay, from now on I won’t crave anything. This doesn’t work because the conditions that give rise to craving will still be present.

The Second Noble Truth tells us that we cling to things we believe
will make us happy or keep us safe. Grasping for one ephemeral thing
after another never satisfies us for long because it’s all impermanent.
It is only when we see this for ourselves that we can stop grasping.
When we do see it, the letting go is easy. The craving will seem to
disappear of its own accord.

The Buddha taught that through diligent practice, we can put an end
to craving. Ending the hamster wheel-chase after satisfaction is
enlightenment (bodhi, “awakened”). The enlightened being exists in a state called nibbna.

The Fourth Noble Truth: The Eightfold Path

The Buddha spent the last 45 or so years of his life giving sermons
on aspects of the Four Noble Truths. The majority of these were about
the Fourth Truth — the path (magga).

In the Fourth Noble Truth,
the Buddha as a physician prescribes the treatment for our illness: The
Eightfold Path. Unlike in many other religions, Buddhism has no
particular benefit to merely believing in a doctrine. Instead, the
emphasis is on living the doctrine and walking the path.

The path is eight broad areas of practice that touches every part of
our lives. It ranges from study to ethical conduct to what you do for a
living to moment-to-moment mindfulness. Every action of body, speech,
and mind are addressed by the path. It is a path of exploration and
discipline to be walked for the rest of one’s life.

Without the path, the first three Truths would just be a theory;
something for philosophers to argue about. The practice of the Eightfold
Path brings the dhamma into one’s life and makes it bloom.

Understanding the Truths Takes Time

If you are still confused about the four Truths, take heart; it’s not
so simple. Fully appreciating what the Truths mean takes years. In
fact, in some schools of Buddhism thorough understanding of the Four
Noble Truths defines enlightenment itself.


http://www.buddhanet.net/pali_chant.htm

Pali
Chanting in the Theravada Buddhist Tradition

* Basic Pronunciation

Vandanâ

Namô Tassa Bhagavatô Arahatô Sammâ-Sambuddhassa
(3x)

Homage to the Triple
Gems
Homage to Him, the Blessed One, the Exalted One, the Fully Enlightened
One.


Ti-Sarana

Buddham Saranam Gacchâmi.
Dhammam Saranam Gacchâmi.
Sangham Saranam Gacchâmi.
Dutiyampi Buddham Saranam Gacchâmi.
Dutiyampi Dhammam Saranam Gacchâmi.
Dutiyampi Sangham Saranam Gacchâmi.
Tatiyampi Buddham Saranarn Gacchâmi.
Tatiyampi Dhammam Saranam Gacchâmi.
Tatiyampi Sangham Saranam Gacchâmi.


Translation: The
Three Refuges


I go to the Buddha
as my refuge.
I go to the Dhamma - The Teachings, as my Refuge.
I go to the Sangha - The Community, as my Refuge.
For the second time I go to the Buddha as my Refuge.
For the second time I go to the Dhamma - The Teachings, as my Refuge.

For the second time I go to the Sangha - The Community, as my Refuge.

For the third time I go to the Buddha as my Refuge.
For the third time I go to the Dhamma - The Teachings, as my Refuge.

For the third time I go to the Sangha - The Community, as my Refuge.


Panca-sila



Pânâtipâtâ Veramani Sikkhâpadam Samâdiyâmi.

Adinnâdânâ Veramani Sikkhâpadam Samâdiyâmi.

Kâmesu Micchâcârâ Veramani Sikkhâpadam
Samâdiyâmi.
Musâvâdâ Veramani Sikkhâpadam Samâdiyâmi.

Surâ Mêraya Majja Pamâdatthânâ Verami
Sikkhâpadam Samâdiyâmi


Imâni Panca Sikkhâpadâni Samâdiyâmi (3x)


Translation: The
Five Precepts


I undertake to observe
the precept to abstain from destroying living beings.
I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from taking things not
given.
I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from sexual misconduct.

I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from false speech.
I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from liquor causing intoxication
and heedlessness.
I undertake to observe the Five Precepts to the best of my ability.(3x)


Buddha Vandana

Iti pi so Bhagavâ-Araham Sammâ-sambuddho.
Vijjâ-carana sampanno Sugato Lokavidû Anuttarro
Purisa-damma-sârathi Satthâ deva-manussânam
Buddho Bhagavâti


Translation - Homage
to the Buddha
Thus
indeed, is that Blessed One: He is the Holy One, fully enlightened,
endowed with clear vision and virtuous conduct, sublime, the Knower
of the worlds, the incomparable leader of men to be tamed, the teacher
of gods and men, enlightened and blessed.


Dhamma Vandana


Svâkkhato
Bhagavatâ Dhammo Sanditthiko Akâliko Ehi-passiko Opanâyiko
Paccattam
veditabbo viññuhiti.


Translation - Homage
to the Teachings
The Dhamma of the Blessed One is perfectly expounded; to be seen here
and how; not delayed in
time; inviting one to come and see; onward leading (to Nibbana); to
be known by the wise, each for himself.


Sangha Vandana


Supati-panno Bhagavato
sâvaka sangho, Ujupati-panno Bhagavato sâvaka sangho.
Ñâya-patipanno Bhagavato sâvaka sangho. Sâmici-patipanno
Bhagavato sâvaka sangho
Yadidam cattâri purisa yugâni attha-purisa-puggalâ
Esa Bhagavato sâvaka sangho.
Âhu-neyyo, pâhu-neyyo, Dakkhi-neyyo,añjalikaraniyo,
anuttaram puññakkhetam lokassâti


Translation - Homage
to the Disciples of the Buddha
The Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples has entered on the good way;
the Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples has entered on the straight
way; the Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples has entered on the proper
way, that is to say; the Four Pairs of Men, the Eight Types of Persons;
the Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples is fit for gifts, fit for
hospitality, fit for offerings, and fit for reverential salutation,
as the incomparable field of merit for the world.


Maha-Mangala
Sutta


Êvam mê
suttam êkam samayam bhagavâ Sâvatthiyam viharati Jêtavanê
Anâthapindikassa ârâmê,
atha kho aññatarâ dêvatâ abhikkantaya
rattiyâ abhikanta vannâ kêvalakappam Jêtavanam
bhâsetvâ, yêna bhagavâ tênupasamkami.
Upasam kamitvâ bhagavantam abhivâdetvâ êkamantam
atthâsi. Êkamantam thitâ kho sâ dêvatâ
bhagavantam gâthâya ajjhabhâsi.
Bahû dêvâ manussâ ca mangalâni acintayum

Âkankhamânâ sotthânam brûhi mangala muttamam.


Asêvanâ
ca bâlânam panditânam ca sêvanâ
Pûjâ ca pûjaniyânam êtam mangala muttamam


Patirûpa dêsa
vâso ca pubbê ca kata puññatâ
Atta sammâ panidhi ca êtam mangala muttamam


Bâhu saccam
ca sippan ca vinayo ca susikkhito
Subhasitâ ca yâ vâcâ êtam mangala muttamam


Mâtâ
pitu upâtthanam puttadârassa sangaho
Anâkulâ ca kammantâ êtam mangala muttamam


Dânam ca dhamma
cariyâ ca ñâtakanam ca sangaho
Anavajjâni kammâni êtam mangala muttamam


Ârati virati
pâpâ majjapânâ ca saññamo
Appamâdo ca dhammêsu êtam mangala muttamam


Gâravo ca
nivâto ca santutthi ca kataññutâ
Kâlêna dhamma savanam êtam mangala muttamam


Khanti ca sôvacassatâ
samanânam ca dassanam
Kâlêna dhamma sâkacchâ êtam mangala muttamam


Tapô ca brahman
cariyam ca ariya saccâ na dassanam
Nibbâna sacchi kiriyâ ca êtam mangala muttamam


Phutthassa lôka
dhammêhi cittam yassa na kampati
Asokam virajam khêmam êtam mangala muttamam


êtâdisâni
katvâna sabbattha maparâjitâ
Sabbhattha sotthim gacchanti tam têsam mangala muttamanti.


Translation:
Discourse
on Blessings


Thus have I heard:
On one occasion
the Exalted One was dwelling at the monastery of Anathapindika, in Jeta’s
Grove, near Savatthi. Now when the night was far spent, a certain deity,
whose surpassing splendour illuminated the entire Jeta Grove, came to
the presence of the Exalted One, and, drawing near, respectfully saluted
Him and stood at one side. Standing thus, he addressed the Exalted One
in verse:
Many deities and men, yearning after good, have pondered on Blessings.
Pray, tell me the Highest Blessing!


Not to associate
with fools, to associate with the wise, and to honour those who are
worthy of honour - this is the Highest Blessing.

To reside in a suitable locality, to have done meritorious actions in
the past, and to set oneself in the right course - this is the Highest
Blessing.


Vast-learning, perfect
handicraft, a highly trained discipline, and pleasant speech
- this is the Highest Blessing.


The support of father
and mother, the cherishing of wife and children, and peaceful occupations
- this is the Highest Blessing.


Liberality, righteous
conduct, the helping of relatives, and blameless actions
- this is the Highest Blessing.


To cease and abstain
from evil, forbearance with respect to intoxicants, and steadfastness
in virtue - this is the Highest Blessing.


Reverence, humility,
contentment, gratitude and the opportune hearing of the Dhamma
- this is the Highest Blessing.


Patience, obedience,
sight of the Samanas (Sanctified Ones), and religious discussions at
due seasons - this is the Highest Blessing.


Self Control, Holy
Life, perception of the Noble Truths, and the realisation of Nibbana

- this is the Highest Blessing.


He whose mind does
not flutter by contact with worldly contingencies, Sorrowless, Stainless,
and Secure - this is the Highest Blessing.


To them, fulfilling
matters such as these, every-where invincible, in every way moving happily
- these are the Highest Blessings.


Karaniya Sutta


Karanîya -
mattha kusalêna - yantam santam padam abhisamecca,
Sakkô ujû ca sûjû ca - suvaco cassa mudu anati
mâni.


Santussakô
ca subharô ca - appa kicco ca salla-huka vutti,
Santindriyô ca nipakô ca - appagabbhô kulêsu
ananugiddhô.


Na ca khuddam samâcarê
kinci - yêna viññu parê upavadeyyum
Sukhinô vâ kheminô hontu - Sabbê sattâ
bhavantu sukhitattâ.


Yêkêci
pâna bhûtatthi - tasâ vâ thâvarâ
vâ anava, sêsâ,
Dîghâ vâ yê mahantâ vâ — majjhimâ
rassakâ - nuka thûlâ.


Ditthâ vâ
yêva additthâ - yêca dûrê vasanti avidûrê,

Bhûta vâ sambhavêsi vâ - sabbê sattâ
bhavantu sukhitattâ.


Na parô param
nikubbêtha - nâti maññêtha katthaci
nam kanci,
Byârôsanâ patigha saññâ - nâñña
- maññassa dukkha miccheyya.


Mâtâ
yathâ niyam puttam - âyusâ êka putta manu rakkhe,

Êvampi sabba bhûtêsu - mânasam bhâvayê
aparimânam.


Mettam ca sabba
lôkasmin - mânasam bhâvayê aparimânam,

Uddham adhô ca tiriyam ca - asambâdham avêram asapattam.


Tittham caram nisinnô
vâ - sayâno vâ yâva tassa vigata middho,
Êtam satim adhittheyya — brahma mêtam vihâram idhamâhu.


Ditthin ca anupa
gamma - sîlavâ dassanêna sampanno,
Kâmêsu vineyya gêdham - nahi jâtu gabbhaseyyam
punarêtiti.



Translation:
Discourse
on Loving Kindness


He who is skilled
in his good and who wishes to attain that state of Calm should act (thus:)
He should be able, upright, perfectly upright, obedient, gentle, and
humble.


Contented, easily
supportable, with few duties, of light livelihood, controlled in senses,
discreet, not imprudent, not be greedily attached to families.


He should not commit
any slight wrong such that other wise men might censure him. May all

beings be happy and secure. May their minds be wholesome.


Whatever living
beings there be: feeble or strong, long, stout, or medium, short, small,
or large, seen or unseen, those dwelling far or near, those who are
born and those who are to be born –may all beings, without exception,
be happy-minded!


Let not one deceive
another nor despise any person whatever in any place. In anger or ill
will, let him not wish any harm to another.


Just as a mother
would protect her only child even at the risk of her own life, even
so let him cultivate a boundless heart towards all beings.


Let his thoughts
of boundless love pervade the whole world: above, below and across–without
any obstruction, without any hatred, without any enmity, Whether he
stands, walks, sits or lies down, as long as he is awake, he should
develop mindfulness. This, they say, is the Highest Conduct.


Not falling into
error, virtuous and endowed with insight, he gives up attachment to
sense-desires. He will surely not be born in any womb again.


Ratana
Sutta


Yânîdha bhûtâni samâgatâni - bhummâni
vâ yâ niva antalikkhê
Sabbêva bhûtâ sumanâ bhavantû - athôpi
sakkacca sunantu bhâsitam.


Tasmâhi bhûtâni
sâmêtha sabbê - mettam karôtha mânusiya
pajâya,
Divâ ca rattô ca haranti yê balim - tasmâhi
nê rakkhatha appamattâ.


Yam kinci vittam
idha vâ huram vâ - saggêsu vâ yam ratanam panitam,

Nano samam atthi tathâgatena - idampi buddhê ratanam panîtam,

Êtêna saccêna suvatthi hôtu.


Khayam virâgam
amatam panîtam - yadajjhagâ sakkyamunî samâhito,

Na têna dhammena samatthi kinci - idampi dhammê ratanam
panîtam
Êtêna saccêna suvatthi hôtu.


Yambuddha settho
parivannayî sucim - samâdhi mânam tarikañña
mâhu
Samâdhinâ têna samô na vijjati - idampi dhammê
ratanam panîtam
Êtêna saccêna suvatthi hôtu.
Ye puggalâ attha satam pasatthâ - cattâri êtâni
yugâni honti,
Te dakkhineyyâ sugatassa sâvakâ - êtêsu
dinnâni mahapphalâni,
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Ye suppa yuttâ
manasâ dalhêna - nikkamino gôtama sâsanamhi

Te patti pattâ amatam vigayha - laddhâ mudhâ nibbutim
bhunjamânâ
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.

Yathinda khîlo pathavim sito siyâ - catubbhi vâtêbhi
asampa kampiyo,
Tathûpamam sappurisam vadâmi — yô ariya saccâni
avecca passati,
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Yê ariya saccâni
vibhâvayanti - gambhira paññnêna sudêsitâni,

Kincâpi tê honti bhusappamattâ - na te bhavam attamam
âdiyanti,
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Sahâvassa
dassana sampadâya - tayassu dhammâ jahitâ bhavanti,

Sakkâya ditthi vicikicchitam ca — silabbatam vâpi yadatthi
kinci,
Catûhapâye hi ca vippamutto - Chacâbhi thânâni
abhabbo kâtum,
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Kincâpi sô
kammam karôti pâpakam - kâyêna vâcâ
udacêtasâ vâ,
Abhabbo sô tassa paticchâdâya - abhabbatâ ditta
padassa vuttâ,
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Vanappagumbê
yathâ phussitaggê - gimhâna mâsê pathamasmin
gimhe,
Tathûpamam dhamma varam adêsayi — nibbânagâmin
paramam hitâya,
Idampi buddhê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Varô varaññû
varadô varâharo - anuttarô dhamma varam adêsayi,

Idampi buddhê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Khinam purânam
navam netthi sambhavam - viratta cittâ âyatike bhavasmim,

Te khina bijâ avirulhicchandâ - nibbanti dhirâ yathâ
yam padipo
Idampi sanghê ratanam panîtam - êtêna saccêna
suvatthi hôtu.


Yânîdha
bhûtâni samâgatani — bhummani vâ yâniva
antalikkhe,
Tathâgatam dêva manussa pûjitam- Buddham namasâma
suvatthi hotu.


Yânîdha
bhûtâni samâgatani — bhummani vâ yâniva
antalikkhe,
Tathâgatam dêva manussa pûjitam - Dhammam namassâma
suvatthi hotu.


Yânîdha
bhûtâni samâgatani — bhummani vâ yâniva
antalikkhe,
Tathâgatam dêva manussa pûjitam - Sangham namassâma
suvatthi hotu.


Translation -
The Jewel Discourse


This Discourse was
delivered by the Buddha in the city of Vesali whose citizens appealed
to the Buddha for help, being afflicted by famine, pestilenee and disturbances
from evil spirits. As a mark of protection for the people of Vesali,
the Buddha delivered this discourse after which the evil spirits were
exorcised and the pestilence subsided.


Whatever beings
are here assembled, whether terrestrial or celestial, may they all be
happy!
Moreover may they attentively listen to my words!


Accordingly give
good heed, all ye beings! Show your love to the human beings who, day
and night, bring offerings to you. Wherefore guard them zealously.


Whatever treasure
there be either here or in the world beyond, or whatever precious jewel
in the precious jewel. By this truth may there be happiness!


The tranquil Sage
of the Sakyas realised that Cessation, Passion-free, Immortality Supreme.

There is nought comparable with the Dhamma. Verily, in the Dhamma is
this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


That Sanctity praised
by the Buddha Supreme is described as “concentration without interruption.
There is nought like that Concentration. Verily, in the Dhamma is this
precious jewel. By this truth may there be happiness!


Those Eight Individuals,
praised by the virtuous, constitute four pairs. They, the worthy of
offerings, the disciples of the Welcome One, - to these gifts given
yield abundant fruit.


Verily, in the Sangha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


With steadfast mind,
applying themselves thoroughly in the Dispensation of Gotama, exempt
(from passion), they have attained to “that which should be attained”,
and, plunging into the Deathless, they enjoy Peace obtained without
price.
Verily, in the Sangha is this precious jewel.


By this truth may
there be happiness!
Just as a firm post, sunk in the earth, cannot be shaken by the four
winds; even so do I declare him to be a righteous person who thoroughly
perceives the Noble Truths.


Verily, in the Sangha
is the precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


Those who comprehend
clearly the Noble Truths, well taught by Him of wisdom deep, do not,
however exceeding heedless they may be, undergo an eighth birth.


Verily, in the Sangha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


For him with the
acquisition of Insight, three conditions come to nought - namely, self-illusion,
doubt, and indulgence in (wrongful) rites and ceremonies, should there
be any. From the four states of misery, he is absolutely freed, and
is incapable of committing the six heinous crimes.


Verily, in the Sangha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


Whatever evil deed
he does, whether by deed, word or thought, he is incapable of hiding
it; for it hath been said that such an act is impossible for one who
has seen the Path.


Verily, in the Sangha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


Like unto the woodland
groves with blossomed tree tops in the first heat of the summer season,
hath the sublime doctrine, that leads to Nibbana, been taught for the
Highest Good.


Verily, in the Buddha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness.


The unrivalled Excellent
One, the Knower, the Giver, and the Bringer of the Excellent has expounded
the excellent Doctrine.


Verily, in the Buddha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


Their past is extinct,
a fresh becoming there is not, their minds are not attached to a future
birth, their desires grow not - those wise ones go out even as this
lamp.


Verily, in the Sangha
is this precious jewel.
By this truth may there be happiness!


We beings here assembled,
whether terrestrial or celestial, salute the Accomplished Buddha, honoured
by gods and men. May there be happiness!


We beings here assembled,
whether terrestrial or celestial, salute the Accomplished Dhamma, honoured
by gods and men. May there be happiness!


We beings here assembled,
whether terrestrial or celestial, salute the Accomplished Sangha, honoured
by gods and men. May there be happiness!


* Basic Pronunciation


a as a in what â
as a in father
i as i in mint î as ee in see
u as u in put û as oo in pool
e as a in cage o as o in no
n as ng in sing ñ as gn in signore


Pausing
Prolong for vowels with ^ or ( - ) such as â, î , û,
e and o.
Pause for double letter such as dd in Buddha : Bu-ddha,
mm in Dhammam : Dha-mmam, ss in Ehi-passiko : E-hi-pa-ssiko



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February 15th is Nirvana day for the Mayana Buddhists. This day remembers the death of Buddha and his passing into Nirvana. It is a day of contemplation and meditation.

 

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