Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research & Practice Universitu 
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 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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05 LESSON Fri Jun 30 2007- (2657 Wed 20 Jun LESSON) Tipitaka from Analytic Insight Net - Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related NEWS through 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 
in
 105 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā is an Online GOOD NEWS CHANNEL FOR WELFARE, HAPPINESS AND PEACE FOR ALL SOCIETIES Catering to more than 3000 Emails: 200 WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter. is the most Positive Energy of informative and research oriented site propagating the teachings of the Awakened One with Awareness the Buddha and on Techno-Politico-Socio Transformation and Economic Emancipation Movement followed by millions of people all over the world. Rendering exact translation as a lesson of this University in one’s mother tongue to this Google Translation and propagation entitles to become a Stream Enterer (Sottapanna) and to attain Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal. Button Plant Green Butterfly E Mail Animation Clip buddhasaid2us@gmail.com jcs4ever@outlook.com, sarvajanow@yahoo.co.in
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 5:33 pm




05
LESSON Fri Jun 30 2007- 


(2657 Wed 20 Jun  LESSON)
Tipitaka

 from


Analytic Insight Net -

Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart


Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related NEWS through 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 
in
 105 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 



Paṭisambhidā
Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya

http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org
anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā

is
an Online GOOD NEWS CHANNEL FOR WELFARE, HAPPINESS AND PEACE FOR ALL
SOCIETIES Catering to more than 3000 Emails: 200 WhatsApp, Facebook and
Twitter.


is the most Positive Energy of informative and research oriented site propagating the teachings of the Awakened One with Awareness the Buddha and on Techno-Politico-Socio Transformation and Economic Emancipation Movement followed by millions of people all over the world.


Rendering
exact translation as a lesson of this University in one’s mother tongue
to this Google Translation and propagation entitles to become a Stream

Enterer (Sottapanna) and to attain Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal.

Button Plant Green Butterfly E Mail Animation Clip

buddhasaid2us@gmail.com
jcs4ever@outlook.com,
sarvajanow@yahoo.co.in



05 LESSON Fri 30 Jun 2007-http://www.tipitaka.org/cst4  Home > CST4 Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka Version 4.0 (CST4)

http://www.tipitaka.org/cst4



http://www.tipitaka.org/

 


Buddha This web site is based on the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD published by the Vipassana Research Institute.
Based at Dhamma Giri, Igatpuri, near Mumbai, India, the Vipassana
Research Institute also publishes literature & disseminates
information related to Vipassana Meditation Technique as taught by S.N.Goenka in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin.


Vipassana is a universal, scientific method towards purifying
the mind. It is the practical essence of the teachings of the Buddha,
who taught Dhamma - the Universal Law of Nature.


The Pāḷi Tipiṭaka is now available online in various scripts.
Although all are in Unicode fonts, you may need to install some fonts
and make some changes to your system to view the site correctly.

Please read the help page carefully for more information on setting up your system and also on how to use this site.


New Desktop software: You can now download the entire Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka to run off your computer in offline mode. Click here for instructions.

New iOS web app: You can now navigate the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka using your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Click here for instructions.

Older Operating systems: Vistors using Windows 95/98 may not be able to view Unicode texts as it is not fully supported by these operating systems. The older VRI Roman site is still available. To use the VRI Roman site you will need to install the VRI Roman Pali fonts. Alternatively you may download an image of the CSCD3 disc (208 MB) and burn your own copy of CSCD3.


In case of difficulties in viewing the Pāḷi Text or if you notice any other errors on this site, please write to help@tipitaka.org describing the problem.


http://www.tipitaka.org/search
Home > Tipitaka Search

Tipiṭaka Search

Two options are available for searching the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipiṭaka:

1) New online search engine.

2)
Older database search engine (see instructions below)

How to use the Database Search Engine

1. Type the word you are looking for in the search box at upper
left hand corner. In case of multiple words, leave a space between
words

2. Click on the Go button

Example 1: Single Word Search

For eg a search for the word “dana” will result in a display as under:

Full text / 133 records

[+] (13) Vinaya
[+] (75) Sutta
[+] (2) Abhidhammapitake
[+] (43) Anna

If you click on the plus sign next to Vinaya, you will see the tree of the results for this word in Vinaya as under

[+] (1) Parivārapāḷi
[+] (1) Sāratthadīpanī-ṭīkā (dutiyo bhāgo)
[+] (1) Vinayasaṅgaha-aṭṭhakathā
[+] (1) Vimativinodanī-ṭīkā (dutiyo bhāgo)
[+] (1) Vinayālaṅkāra-ṭīkā (paṭhamo bhāgo)
[+] (3) Vinayavinicchaya-ṭīkā (dutiyo bhāgo)
[+] (1) Pācityādiyojanā
[+] (4) Khuddasikkhā-mūlasikkhā

3. If you click further on the (+) sign again, it will open up the tree further.

4. If you click on the number (13)
next to Vinaya – this means 13 results in Vinaya – then you will see
the results open up in the lower box on the right,  as under :



1. Parivārapāḷi/Ekuttarikanayo pg.143(Goto Text)

dānā paṭiggahā bhogā, tividhā puna dhammikā.



2. Sāratthadīpanī-ṭīkā (dutiyo bhāgo)/1. Pārājikakaṇḍaṃ pg.24(Goto Text)

acchedānupasampanna-dānā gāhopasammatī”ti.–



3. Vinayasaṅgaha-aṭṭhakathā/13. Dānalakkhaṇādivinicchayakathā pg.16(Goto Text)

ettha tāva dānantiattano santakassa cīvarādiparikkhārassa



4. Vimativinodanī-ṭīkā (dutiyo bhāgo)/Pañcavaggo pg.359(Goto Text)

Brahmadaṇḍassa dānanti kharadaṇḍassa ukkaṭṭhadaṇḍassa dānaṃ.



5. Vinayālaṅkāra-ṭīkā (paṭhamo bhāgo)/33. Kammākammavinicchayakathā pg.117(Goto Text)

Brahmadaṇḍassa dānanti kharadaṇḍassaukkaṭṭhadaṇḍassa dānaṃ.

and so on. Click on Next Result set to see more results

5. If you click on any result, that particular para will open
up in the box on the upper right with the search word highlighted, In
case of multiple words, the same will be highlighted in different
colours.

6. If you wish to see more lines in the box for large paragraphs, then increase the same in the box saying “Show lines on page”

7. Clicking on Next result set in upper box will show more pages from the same paragraph.

8. To go back to a previous screen, press the back button of your browser.

Example 2: Use of Multiple Words

A search for the words “phutthassa loke dhamma” will give the results as below

Full Text
/ 4 records

[+] (4)
Sutta

and if you click on the (4) next to Sutta, you should see as under in the result box on lower right

1. Khuddakapāṭha-aṭṭhakathā/5. Maṅgalasuttavaṇṇanā pg.43(Goto Text)

12 . Idāni phuṭṭhassa lokadhammehīti ettha phuṭṭhassāti phusitassa chupitassa sampattassa. Loke dhammā

3. Suttanipāta-aṭṭhakathā/2. Cūḷavaggo pg.58(Goto Text)

271 . Idāni phuṭṭhassa lokadhammehīti ettha phuṭṭhassāti phusitassa chupitassa sampattassa. Loke dhammā lokadhammā, yāva lokappavatti, tāva anivattakā dhammāti vuttaṃ hoti.

At any time, you can type in a fresh word in the search box and click “Go”. 

There is no need to use diacriticals for search. However if you wish to do so, please use the keyboard below to type the same.

Key Help for special Pāḷi characters

Click on the buttons below to enter special Pali characters, and
then copy the text from the box below into the search engine’s box


http://www.tipitaka.org/help

Home > Help


Help


This section contains the following:




Recommended Unicode fonts


Cyrillic - Please install the font “Doulos SIL” from

http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&item_id=DoulosSILfont


Devanagari - please install the font  “CDAC-Surekh” from

http://biharvidhanparishad.gov.in/HindiFonts.htm


Khmer - Please install the font “Khmer Unicode Pack” from

http://www.khmeros.info/en/download


Myanmar -  Please download and install the Myanmar1 font


After you have installed these fonts, in Internet Explorer
choose File –> Tools –> Internet Options –> Fonts –> In
Web Page fonts, select Myanmar1  instead of the default Times New Roman.
 Click OK and the site should display correctly now.  You may need to
do the same in Firefox too. However  Firefox  displays Myamaar fonts
better than Internet Explorer, so we recomend that you download the
same.


Roman - Internet Explorer users: -This site
uses Unicode fonts for displaying letters with diacritical marks. We
recommened installing the following Unicode fonts:



After you have installed these fonts, in Internet Explorer choose
File –> Tools –> Internet Options –> Fonts –> In Web
Page fonts, select Times Ext Roman instead of the default Times New
Roman.  Click OK and the site should display correctly now.

Sinhala - Please download and install these fonts: UN-Abhaya (normal), UN-Abhaya (bold) and UN-Samantha


Tibetan - Please install the font “Tibetan Machine Uni” from

http://www.thlib.org/tools/scripts/wiki/tibetan%20machine%20uni.html

How to increase font display size


1. For Internet Explorer - go to  View –> text size and select a larger size.
2. For Firefox - press  Ctrl and +(Plus Sign) to increase size and  -(Minus sign) to decrease the font size.



Special instructions for Windows XP, 98 and 95


Windows XP


  • To view these scripts in Windows XP, it is essential to
    first enable Indic scripts and support for complex languages. Go to
    Control Panel –> Regional and Language Options –> Languages -
    > Install files for complex scripts including right to left languages
    (including Thai). Click the box and apply, at this point you will need
    to insert your Windows CD ROM.
  • You may also need to install a file called usp10.dll so that the browser displays the text correctly. For this please try to update your system based on the info listed on this Wikipedia page.
  • For best rendering you need to place a copy of usp10.dll in your web browser’s system directory. Here are the locations of the system directories for Internet Explorer and Firefox: 
    C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer
    C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox
    Please use the latest version of Firefox for best rendering. It is a free download.
  • You may also need to install Open Source Unicode fonts for each script as listed below.

Windows 95 and 98


Visitors using Windows 95/98 may not be able to view Unicode texts as it is not fully supported by these operating systems. The older VRI Roman site is still available. To use the VRI Roman site you will need to install the VRI Roman Pali fonts. Alternatively you may download an image of the CSCD3 disc (208 MB) and burn your own copy of CSCD3.



How to use the Tipitaka site


Click on the script of your choice - it will open up in a seperate window


Click on the (+) sign in the left frame and the Tree will open
up showing links to Books. Click further to navigate into each book,
chapter and section.


When you click on the selected Section, that page will open in the right frame.


Text in [ Blue color fonts] indicates a foot note


Text in Bold indicates cross referencing in Atthakathas or Tikas or Anya with the Mul or otherwise


The following abbreviations are used to refer to different versions of the Tipitaka:


  • sī. = Sri Lankan
  • syā. = Thai
  • pī. = Pali Text Society
  • ka. = Cambodian

References to other Tipitaka versions are most often used where
there are “variant readings”, that is, where the text differs between
versions. In the example below, the Sri Lankan, Thai and PTS editions
have “vāssa” instead of “vā assa”.


  • ‘Atthi me attā’ti vā assa [vāssa (sī. syā. pī.)]


Tipiṭaka Scripts
Cyrillic Web
Devanagari Web | PDF
Gujarati Web
Kannada Web
Malayalam Web
Roman Web | PDF
Tamil Web
Telugu Web
Other Scripts
(Bengali, Gurmukhi, Khmer, Myanmar, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan)






http://www.tipitaka.org/cst4

Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka Version 4.0 (CST4)


CST4 is a desktop client for browsing and searching the Pāli Canon. It is the successor to the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD 3.0 (CSCD3).


System requirements: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
or 8.1. Prerequisites: .NET Framework 2.0, Windows Installer. On Windows
XP, complex script support must be enabled (see below). The program
uses about 350MB of disk space including the Tipitaka data and search
index.


Step 1:


The CST4 program requires the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 to run. Windows XP users, click here
to download it. Windows 7 and later includes the .NET Framework by
default. To ensure that it is installed on your computer, please go to
Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows features on
or off. In the list of features, scroll down to “.NET Framework 3.5.1″
and check it if it is not checked, then click OK.


Step 2:


Download the CST4 installer (40.9 MB)


To start the installation, click on the .msi file that you
downloaded. If your version of Windows cannot run a .msi file, download
the Windows Installer component from Microsoft and install.


To type Roman-script Unicode Pali, download and install a keyboard driver.


Enable complex script support in Windows XP. Go to Control
Panel -> Regional and Language Options -> Languages -> Click
the checkbox “Install files for complex scripts including right to left
languages (including Thai)”. Then OK. More info…


To type in Devanagari and other Indic scripts, install the keyboard drivers included with Windows. Installation instructions: Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8.


Step 3:


To run the program, click the “Chattha Sangayana Tipitaka 4.0”
shortcut created by the installer. The search index is generated the
first time the program runs. This can take up to 15 minutes.


To report bugs, make suggestions or request additional features, please send an email to the development team at help@tipitaka.org. Your input is highly appreciated.



Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka Version 4.0 (CST4)


CST4 is a desktop client for browsing and searching the Pāli Canon. It is the successor to the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD 3.0 (CSCD3).


System requirements: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
or 8.1. Prerequisites: .NET Framework 2.0, Windows Installer. On Windows
XP, complex script support must be enabled (see below). The program
uses about 350MB of disk space including the Tipitaka data and search
index.


Step 1:


The CST4 program requires the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 to run. Windows XP users, click here
to download it. Windows 7 and later includes the .NET Framework by
default. To ensure that it is installed on your computer, please go to
Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows features on
or off. In the list of features, scroll down to “.NET Framework 3.5.1″
and check it if it is not checked, then click OK.


Step 2:


Download the CST4 installer (40.9 MB)


To start the installation, click on the .msi file that you
downloaded. If your version of Windows cannot run a .msi file, download
the Windows Installer component from Microsoft and install.


To type Roman-script Unicode Pali, download and install a keyboard driver.


Enable complex script support in Windows XP. Go to Control
Panel -> Regional and Language Options -> Languages -> Click
the checkbox “Install files for complex scripts including right to left
languages (including Thai)”. Then OK. More info…


To type in Devanagari and other Indic scripts, install the keyboard drivers included with Windows. Installation instructions: Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8.


Step 3:


To run the program, click the “Chattha Sangayana Tipitaka 4.0”
shortcut created by the installer. The search index is generated the
first time the program runs. This can take up to 15 minutes.


To report bugs, make suggestions or request additional features, please send an email to the development team at help@tipitaka.org. Your input is highly appreciated.



http://www.tipitaka.org/webapp



Home > iOS

iOS Web App

This is a work in progress. The Tipiṭaka (Mūla) is available
for all the scripts, and the Aṭṭhakathā is available for the Roman
script.

To install the Pāḷi Tipiṭaka web app on your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad go to tipitaka.org/ios, and then follow the steps below for iPhone & iPod Touch and iPad.

iPad
Click on the icon at the top of the screen as shown below.

Click on the “Add to Home Screen” button.

Click on the “Add” button.

The Pāḷi Tipiṭaka icon will now appear on your iPad’s home screen.

iPhone & iPod Touch
Click on the icon at the bottom center of the screen as shown below.

Click on the “Add to Home Screen” button.

Click on the “Add” button.

The Pāḷi Tipiṭaka icon will now appear on your iPhone’s or iPod Touch’s home screen.

Tipiṭaka Scripts
Cyrillic Web
Devanagari Web | PDF
Gujarati Web
Kannada Web
Malayalam Web
Roman Web | PDF
Tamil Web
Telugu Web
Other Scripts
(Bengali, Gurmukhi, Khmer, Myanmar, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan)

Buddha
http://www.tipitaka.org/cyrl/



http://www.tipitaka.org/deva/




http://www.tipitaka.org/pdf/deva/

Home > PDF

Tipiṭaka in PDF

Devanāgarī script texts:

Zip Files Size (MB)
तिपिटक (मूल)
121
            विनयपिटक
16
            सुत्तपिटक
71
            अभिधम्मपिटक
34
अट्ठकथा
136
            विनयपिटक (अट्ठकथा)
10
            सुत्तपिटक (अट्ठकथा)
116
            अभिधम्मपिटक (अट्ठकथा)
9
टीका
116
            विनयपिटक (टीका)
45
            सुत्तपिटक (टीका)
46
            अभिधम्मपिटक (टीका)
25
अन्य
71

 


Buddha
http://www.tipitaka.org/gujr/







http://www.tipitaka.org/knda/





http://www.tipitaka.org/mlym/





Buddha
http://www.tipitaka.org/romn/






http://www.tipitaka.org/pdf/romn/

Tipiṭaka in PDF

Roman script texts:

Zip Files Size (MB)
Tipitaka (Mūla)
100
            Vinayapiṭaka
13
            Suttapiṭaka
59
            Abhidhammapiṭaka
29
Aṭṭhakathā
106
            Vinayapiṭaka (aṭṭhakathā)
7
            Suttapiṭaka (aṭṭhakathā)
93
            Abhidhammapiṭaka (aṭṭhakathā)
6
Tīkā
88
            Vinayapiṭaka (ṭīkā)
34
            Suttapiṭaka (ṭīkā)
36
            Abhidhammapiṭaka (ṭīkā)
18
Anya
55








http://www.tipitaka.org/others
Home > Other Scripts

Scripts which are unapproved or under construction

The scripts listed above have various display issues caused by the
unicode font being used. Please review the Peding issues PDF file for
each script for details. Any suggestions to resolve these issues are
welcome. VRI is also looking for volunteers to check these scripts.
Please write to help@tipitaka.org if you would like to help with this effort.

Please read the help page carefully for more information on setting up your system and also on how to use this site.

In case of difficulties in viewing the Pāḷi Text or if you notice any other errors on this site, please  write to help@tipitaka.org describing the problem.


Buddha
http://www.tipitaka.org/chattha
Home > Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana

Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana
The Six Dhamma Councils

The authentic teachings of Gotama the Buddha have been preserved
and handed down to us and are to be found in the Tipiṭaka. The Pāli
word, Tipiṭaka’, literally means `the three baskets’ (ti=three +
piṭaka=collections of scriptures). All of the Buddha’s teachings were
divided into three parts.

1.The first part is known as the Vinaya Piṭaka and it contains all the rules which Buddha laid down for monks and nuns.
2.The second part is called the Suttaṅta Piṭaka and it contains the Discourses.
3.The third part is known as the Abhidhamma Piṭaka and comprises the psycho-ethical teachings of the Buddha.

It is known, that whenever the Buddha gave a discourse to his
ordained disciples or lay-followers or prescribed a monastic rule in the
course of his forty-five year ministry, those of his devoted and
learned monks, then present would immediately commit his teachings word
for word to memory. Thus the Buddha’s words were preserved accurately
and were in due course passed down orally from teacher to pupil. Some of
the monks who had heard the Buddha preach in person were Arahants, and
so by definition, `pure ones’ free from passion, ill-will and delusion
and therefore, was without doubt capable of retaining, perfectly the
Buddha’s words. Thus they ensured that the Buddha’s teachings would be
preserved faithfully for posterity.

Even those devoted monks who had not yet attained Arahantahood but
had reached the first three stages of sainthood and had powerful,
retentive memories could also call to mind word for word what the Buddha
had preached and so could be worthy custodians of the Buddha’s
teachings. One such monk was Ānanda, the chosen attendant and constant
companion of the Buddha during the last twenty-five years of the his
life. Ānanda was highly intelligent and gifted with the ability to
remember whatever he had heard. Indeed, it was his express wish that the
Buddha always relate all of his discourses to him and although he was
not yet an Arahanta he deliberately committed to memory word for word
all the Buddha’s sermons with which he exhorted monks, nuns and his lay
followers. The combined efforts of these gifted and devoted monks made
it possible for the Dhamma and Vinaya, as taught by the Buddha to be
preserved in its original state.

The Pāli Tipiṭaka and its allied literature exists as a result of
the Buddha’s discovery of the noble and liberating path of the pure
Dhamma. This path enables all those who follow it to lead a peaceful and
happy life. Indeed, in this day and age we are fortunate to have the
authentic teachings of the Buddha preserved for future generations
through the conscientious and concerted efforts of his ordained
disciples down through the ages. The Buddha had said to his disciples
that when he was no longer amongst them, that it was essential that the
Saṅgha should come together for the purpose of collectively reciting the
Dhamma, precisely as he had taught it. In compliance with this
instruction the first Elders duly called a council and systematically
ordered all the Buddha’s discourses and monastic rules and then
faithfully recited them word for word in concert.

The teachings contained in the Tipiṭaka are also known as the
Doctrine of the Elders [Theravāda]. These discourses number several
hundred and have always been recited word for word ever since the First
Council was convened. Subsequently, more Councils have been called for a
number of reasons but at every one of them the entire body of the
Buddha’s teaching has always been recited by the Saṅgha participants, in
concert and word for word. The first council took place three months
after the Buddha’s attainment of Mahāparinibbāṇa and was followed by
five more, two of which were convened in the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries. These collective recitations which were performed by the
monks at all these Dhamma Councils are known as the `Dhamma Saṅgītis’,
the Dhamma Recitations. They are so designated because of the precedent
set at the First Dhamma Council, when all the Teachings were recited
first by an Elder of the Saṅgha and then chanted once again in chorus by
all of the monks attending the assembly. The recitation was judged to
have been authentic, when and only when, it had been approved
unanimously by the members of the Council. What follows is a brief
history of the Six Councils.

The First Council

King Ajātasattu sponsored the First Council. It was convened in
544 B.C. in the Sattapaāāī Cave situated outside Rājagaha three months
after the Buddha had passed away. A detailed account of this historic
meeting can be found in the Cūllavagga of the Vinaya Piṭaka. According
to this record the incident which prompted the Elder Mahākassapa to call
this meeting was his hearing a disparaging remark about the strict rule
of life for monks. This is what happened. The monk Subhadda, a former
barber, who had ordained late in life, upon hearing that the Buddha had
expired, voiced his resentment at having to abide by all the rules for
monks laid down by the Buddha. Many monks lamented the passing of the
Buddha and were deeply grieved. However, the Elder Mahākassapa heard
Subhadda say: “Enough your Reverences, do not grieve, do not lament. We
are well rid of this great recluse (the Buddha). We were tormented when
he said, `this is allowable to you, this is not allowable to you’ but
now we will be able to do as we like and we will not have to do what we
do not like'’. Mahākassapa was alarmed by his remark and feared that the
Dhamma and the Vinaya might be corrupted and not survive intact if
other monks were to behave like Subhadda and interpret the Dhamma and
the Vinaya rules as they pleased. To avoid this he decided that the
Dhamma must be preserved and protected. To this end after gaining the
Saṅgha’s approval he called to council five hundred Arahants. Ānanda was
to be included in this provided he attained Arahanthood by the time the
council convened. With the Elder Mahākassapa presiding, the
five-hundred Arahant monks met in council during the rainy season. The
first thing Mahākassapa did was to question the foremost expert on the
Vinaya of the day, Venerable Upāli on particulars of the monastic rule.
This monk was well qualified for the task as the Buddha had taught him
the whole of the Vinaya himself. First of all the Elder Mahākassapa
asked him specifically about the ruling on the first offense [pārājika],
with regard to the subject, the occasion, the individual introduced,
the proclamation, the repetition of the proclamation, the offense and
the case of non-offense. Upāli gave knowledgeable and adequate answers
and his remarks met with the unanimous approval of the presiding Saṅgha.
Thus the Vinaya was formally approved.

The Elder Mahākassapa then turned his attention to Ānanda in
virtue of his reputable expertise in all matters connected with the
Dhamma. Happily, the night before the Council was to meet, Ānanda had
attained Arahantship and joined the Council. The Elder Mahākassapa,
therefore, was able to question him at length with complete confidence
about the Dhamma with specific reference to the Buddha’s sermons. This
interrogation on the Dhamma sought to verify the place where all the
discourses were first preached and the person to whom they had been
addressed. Ānanda, aided by his word-perfect memory was able to answer
accurately and so the Discourses met with the unanimous approval of the
Saṅgha. The First Council also gave its official seal of approval for
the closure of the chapter on the minor and lesser rules, and approval
for their observance. It took the monks seven months to recite the whole
of the Vinaya and the Dhamma and those monks sufficiently endowed with
good memories retained all that had been recited. This historic first
council came to be known as the Paācasatika because five-hundred fully
enlightened Arahants had taken part in it.

The Second Council

The Second Council was called one hundred years after the Buddha’s
Parinibbāṇa in order to settle a serious dispute over the `ten points’.
This is a reference to some monks breaking of ten minor rules. they
were given to:

    1. Storing salt in a horn.
    2. Eating after midday.
    3. Eating once and then going again to a village for alms.
    4. Holding the Uposatha Ceremony with monks dwelling in the same locality.
    5. Carrying out official acts when the assembly was incomplete.
    6. Following a certain practice because it was done by one’s tutor or teacher.
    7. Eating sour milk after one had his midday meal.
    8. Consuming strong drink before it had been fermented.
    9. Using a rug which was not the proper size.
    10. Using gold and silver.

Their misdeeds became an issue and caused a major controversy as
breaking these rules was thought to contradict the Buddha’s original
teachings. King Kāḷāsoka was the Second Council’s patron and the meeting
took place at Vesāli due to the following circumstances. One day,
whilst visiting the Mahāvana Grove at Veāsli, the Elder Yasa came to
know that a large group of monks known as the Vajjians were infringing
the rule which prohibited monk’s accepting gold and silver by openly
asking for it from their lay devotees. He immediately criticized their
behavior and their response was to offer him a share of their illegal
gains in the hope that he would be won over. The Elder Yasa, however
declined and scorned their behavior. The monks immediately sued him with
a formal action of reconciliation, accusing him of having blamed their
lay devotees. The Elder Yasa accordingly reconciled himself with the lay
devotees, but at the same time, convinced them that the Vijjian monks
had done wrong by quoting the Buddha’s pronouncement on the prohibition
against accepting or soliciting for gold and silver. The laymen
immediately expressed their support for the Elder Yasa and declared the
Vajjian monks to the wrong-doers and heretics, saying “the Elder Yasa
alone is the real monk and Sākyan son. All the others are not monks, not
Sākyan sons'’.

The Stubborn and unrepentant Vajjian monks then moved to suspend
the Venerable Yasa Thera without the approval of the rest of the Saṅgha
when they came to know of the outcome of his meeting with their lay
devotees. The Elder Yasa, however escaped their censure and went in
search of support from monks elsewhere, who upheld his orthodox views on
the Vinaya. Sixty forest dwelling monks from Pāvā and eighty monks from
the southern regions of Avanti who were of the same view, offered to
help him to check the corruption of the Vinaya. Together they decided to
go to Soreyya to consult the Venerable Revata as he was a highly
revered monk and an expert in the Dhamma and the Vinaya. As soon as the
Vajjian monks came to know this they also sought the Venerable Revata’s
support by offering him the four requisites which he promptly refused.
These monks then sought to use the same means to win over the Venerable
Revata’s attendant, the Venerable Uttara. At first he too, rightly
declined their offer but they craftily persuaded him to accept their
offer, saying that when the requisites meant for the Buddha were not
accepted by him, Ānanda would be asked to accept them and would often
agree to do so. Uttara changed his mind and accepted the requisites.
Urged on by them he then agreed to go and persuade the Venerable Revata
to declare that the Vajjian monks were indeed speakers of the Truth and
upholders of the Dhamma. The Venerable Revata saw through their ruse and
refused to support them. He then dismissed Uttara. In order to settle
the matter once and for all, the Venerable Revata advised that a council
should be called at Vāḷikārāma with himself asking questions on the ten
offenses of the most senior of the Elders of the day, the Thera
Sabbjakāmi. Once his opinion was given it was to be heard by a committee
of eight monks, and its validity decided by their vote. The eight monks
called to judge the matter were the Venerables Sabbakāmi, saḷha,
Khujjasobhita and Vāsabhagāmika, from the East and four monks from the
West, the Venerables Revata, Sambhuta-Sāṇavāsī, Yasa and Sumana. They
thoroughly debated the matter with Revata as the questioner and
sabbakāmī answering his questions. After the debate was heard the eight
monks decided against the Vajjian monks and their verdict was announced
to the assembly. Afterwards seven-hundred monks recited the Dhamma and
Vinaya and this recital came to be known as the Sattasatī because
seven-hundred monks had taken part in it. This historic council is also
called, the Yasatthera Sangīti because of the major role the Elder Yasa
played in it and his zeal for safeguarding the Vinaya. The Vajjian monks
categorically refused to accept the Council’s decision and in defiance
called a council of there own which was called the Mahāsaṅgiti.

The Third Council

The Third Council was held primarily to rid the Saṅgha of
corruption and bogus monks who held heretical views. The Council was
convened in 326 B.C. At Asokārāma in Paṭaliputta under the patronage of
Emperor Asoka. It was presided over by the Elder Moggaliputta Tissa and
one thousand monks participated in this Council. Tradition has it that
Asoka had won his throne through shedding the blood of all his father’s
son’s save his own brother, Tissa Kumāra who eventually got ordained and
achieved Arahantship.

Asoka was crowned in the two hundred and eighteenth year after the
Buddha’s Mahaparinibbāna. At first he paid only token homage to the
Dhamma and the Saṅgha and also supported members of other religious
sects as his father had done before him. However, all this changed when
he met the pious novice-monk Nigrodha who preached him the
Appamāda-vagga. Thereafter he ceased supporting other religious groups
and his interest in and devotion to the Dhamma deepened. He used his
enormous wealth to build, it is said, eighty-four thousand pagodas and
vihāras and to lavishly support the Bhikkhus with the four requisites.
His son Mahinda and his daughter Saṅghamittā were ordained and admitted
to the Saṅgha. Eventually, his generosity was to cause serious problems
within the Saṅgha. In time the order was infiltrated by many unworthy
men, holding heretical views and who were attracted to the order because
of the Emperor’s generous support and costly offerings of food,
clothing, shelter and medicine. Large numbers of faithless, greedy men
espousing wrong views tried to join the order but were deemed unfit for
ordination. Despite this they seized the chance to exploit the Emperor’s
generosity for their own ends and donned robes and joined the order
without having been ordained properly. Consequently, respect for the
Saṅgha diminished. When this came to light some of the genuine monks
refused to hold the prescribed purification or Uposatha ceremony in the
company of the corrupt, heretical monks.

When the Emperor heard about this he sought to rectify the
situation and dispatched one of his ministers to the monks with the
command that they perform the ceremony. However, the Emperor had given
the minister no specific orders as to what means were to be used to
carry out his command. The monks refused to obey and hold the ceremony
in the company of their false and `thieving’ companions
[theyyasinivāsaka]. In desperation the angry minister advanced down the
line of seated monks and drawing his sword, beheaded all of them one
after the other until he came to the King’s brother, Tissa who had been
ordained. The horrified minister stopped the slaughter and fled the hall
and reported back to the Emperor Asoka was deeply grieved and upset by
what had happened and blamed himself for the killings. He sought Thera
Moggaliputta Tissa’s counsel. He proposed that the heretical monks be
expelled from the order and a third Council be convened immediately. So
it was that in the seventeenth year of the Emperor’s reign the Third
Council was called. Thera Moggaliputta Tissa headed the proceedings and
chose one thousand monks from the sixty thousand participants for the
traditional recitation of the Dhamma and the Vinaya, which went on for
nine months. The Emperor, himself questioned monks from a number of
monasteries about the teachings of the Buddha. Those who held wrong
views were exposed and expelled from the Saṅgha immediately. In this way
the Bhikkhu Saṅgha was purged of heretics and bogus bhikkhus.

This council achieved a number of other important things as well.
The Elder Moggaliputta Tissa, in order to refute a number of heresies
and ensure the Dhamma was kept pure, complied a book during the council
called the Kathāvatthu. This book consists of twenty-three chapters, and
is a collection of discussion (kathā) and refutations of the heretical
views held by various sects on matters philosophical. It is the fifth of
the seven books of the Abhidhamma Piṭaka. The members of the Council
also gave a royal seal of approval to the doctrine of the Buddha, naming
it the Vibhajjavāda, the Doctrine of Analysis. It is identical with the
approved Theravāda doctrine. One of the most significant achievements
of this Dhamma assembly and one which was to bear fruit for centuries to
come, was the Emperor’s sending forth of monks, well versed in the
Buddha’s Dhamma and Vinaya who could recite all of it by heart, to teach
it in nine different countries. These Dhammadūta monks included the
Venerable Majjhantika Thera who went to Kashmir and Gandhāra. He was
asked to preach the Dhamma and establish an order of monks there. The
Venerable Mahādeva was sent to Mahinsakamaṇḍaḷa (modern Mysore) and the
Venerable Rakkhita Thera was dispatched to Vanavāsī (northern Kanara in
the south of India.) The Venerable Yonaka Dhammarakkhita Thera was sent
to Upper Aparantaka (northern Gujarat, Kathiawar, Kutch and Sindh].

The Venerable Mahārakkhita Thera went to Yonaka-loka (the land of
the lonians, Bactrians and the Greeks.) The Venerable Majjhima Thera
went to Himavanta (the place adjoining the Himalayas.) The Venerable
Soṇa and the Venerable Uttara were sent to Suvaṇṇabhūmi [now Myanmar].
The Venerable Mahinda Thera, The Venerable Ittiya Thera, the Venerable
Uttiya Thera, the Venerable Sambala Thera and the Venerable Bhaddasāla
Thera were sent to Tambapaṇṇi (now Sri Lanka). The Dhamma missions of
these monks succeeded and bore great fruits in the course of time and
went a long way in ennobling the peoples of these lands with the gift of
the Dhamma and influencing their civilizations and cultures.

With the spread of Dhamma through the words of the Buddha, in due
course India came to be known as Visvaguru, the teacher of the world.

The Fourth Council

The Fourth Council was held in Tambapaṇṇi [Sri Lanka] in 29 B.C.
under the patronage of King Vaṭṭagāmaṇi. The main reason for its
convening was the realization that is was now not possible for the
majority of monks to retain the entire Tipiṭaka in their memories as had
been the case formerly for the Venerable Mahinda and those who followed
him soon after. Therefore, as the art of writing had, by this time
developed substantially, it was thought expedient and necessary to have
the entire body of the Buddha’s teaching written down. King Vaṭṭagāmaṇi
supported the monk’s idea and a council was held specifically to reduce
the Tipiṭaka in its entirety to writing. Therefore, so that the genuine
Dhamma might be lastingly preserved, the Venerable Mahārakhita and five
hundred monks recited the words of the Buddha and then wrote them down
on palm leaves. This remarkable project took place in a cave called, the
Āloka lena, situated in the cleft of an ancient landslip near what is
now Matale. Thus the aim of the Council was achieved and the
preservation in writing of the authentic Dhamma was ensured. Later, in
the Eighteenth Century, King Vijayarājasīha had images of the Buddha
created in this cave.

The Fifth Council

The Fifth Council took place in Māndalay, Burma now known as
Myanmar in 1871 A.D. in the reign of King Mindon. The chief objective of
this meeting was to recite all the teachings of the Buddha and examine
them in minute detail to see if any of them had been altered, distorted
or dropped. It was presided over by three Elders, the Venerable
Mahāthera Jāgarābhivaṃsa, the Venerable Narindābhidhaja, and the
Venerable Mahāthera Sumaṅgalasāmi in the company of some two thousand
four hundred monks (2,400). Their joint Dhamma recitation lasted for
five months. It was also the work of this council to cause the entire
Tipiṭaka to be inscribed for posterity on seven hundred and twenty-nine
marble slabs in the Myanmar script after its recitation had been
completed and unanimously approved. This monumental task was done by
some two thousand four hundred erudite monks and many skilled craftsmen
who upon completion of each slab had them housed in beautiful miniature
`piṭaka’ pagodas on a special site in the grounds of King Mindon’s
Kuthodaw Pagoda at the foot of Māndalay Hill where this so called
`largest book in the world’, stands to this day.

The Sixth Council

The Sixth Council was called at Kaba Aye in Yangon, formerly
Rangoon in 1954, eighty-three years after the fifth one was held in
Mandalay. It was sponsored by the Burmese Government led by the Prime
Minister, the Honorable U Nu. He authorized the construction of the Mahā
Pāsāna Gūhā, the great cave that was built from the ground up, to serve
as the gathering place much like India’s Sattapānni Cave–the site of
the first Dhamma Council. Upon its completion, the Council met on the
17th of May, 1954. As in the case of the preceding councils, its first
objective was to affirm and preserve the genuine Dhamma and Vinaya.
However it was unique in so far as the monks who took part in it came
from eight countries. These two thousand five hundred learned Theravāda
monks came from Myanmar, Cambodia, India, Laos, Nepal, Sri Lanka,
Thailand and Vietnam. The late Venerable Mahāsi Sayadaw was appointed
the noble task of asking the required questions about the Dhamma of the
Venerable Bhadanta Vicittasārābhivaṃsa Tipiṭakadhara Dhammabhaṇḍāgārika
who answered all of them learnedly and satisfactorily. By the time this
council met, all the participating countries had the Pāli Tipiṭaka
rendered into their native scripts, with the exception of India.

The traditional recitation of the Dhamma Scriptures took two years
during which the Tipiṭaka and its allied literature in all the scripts
were painstakingly examined. Any differences found were noted down, the
necessary corrections were made and all the versions were then collated.
Happily, it was found that there was not much difference in the content
of any of the texts. Finally, after the Council had officially approved
them, all the volumes of the Tipiṭaka and their Commentaries were
prepared for printing on modern presses and published in the Myanmar
(Burmese) script. This notable achievement was made possible through the
dedicated efforts of the two thousand five hundred monks and numerous
lay people. Their work came to an end in May, 1956, two and a half
millennia after the Lord attained Parinibbāna. This council’s work was
the unique achievement of representatives from the entire Buddhist
world. The version of the Tipiṭaka which it undertook to produce has
been recognized as being true to the pristine teachings of Gotama the
Buddha and the most authoritative rendering of them to date.

The volumes printed after the Sixth Saṅgāyana were printed in
Myanmar script. In order to make the volumes to the people of India,
Vipassana Research Institute started the project to print the Tipiṭaka
with its Aṭṭhakathās and ṭikas in Devanagari in the year 1990.

This Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD-ROM which is a reproduction of the text
authenticated in the Sixth Saṅgāyana is now being presented to the world
so that the words of the Buddha are easily made available to the
devotees and the scholars. The Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD-ROM can presently be
viewed in the following scripts Devanagari, Myanmar and Roman.,  Sri
Lankan, Thai and Mongol scripts.

May All beings be happy






http://www.tipitaka.org/thai-dict
Home > Pāḷi-Thai Dictionary

An Introductory Note to
Bhikkhu P. A. Payutto’s Dictionary of Buddhism

Bhikkhu P. A. Payutto’s Dictionary of Buddhism actually
comprises three smaller bilingual dictionaries compiled over a span of
some forty years on different occasions and for different purposes:

  • Dictionary of Numerical Dhammas
  • Thai-English Buddhist Dictionary
  • English-Thai Buddhist Dictionary

Part I, the core of the entire volume, is a selection of the
Buddha’s teachings classified according to the number of Dhamma items
involved under each entry (or group) into eleven sections, ranging from
“groups of one” to “groups of more than ten.” All entries are further
arranged in Thai alphabetical order within each section, but only those
with full explanations are, for ease of reference, numbered throughout.
To date, 359 such entries have been covered-from Kalyàõamittatà in the
first section up to Kilesa in the last. The definitions are all given in
Thai, but systematically interspersed with Romanized Pali terms
followed by brief meanings in English. Apart from a regular table of
contents enumerating all the Dhamma groups dealt with, there is a
special table of categorizations of closely related Dhamma groups. To
facilitate word searches, an index of Thai terms and a separate index of
Romanized Pali terms are also included.

The Thai-English Buddhist Dictionary in Part II is a short
dictionary of key Buddhist terms in Thai, supplied with Romanized Pali
equivalents and succinct definitions or explanations in English. Where a
term is exclusively of Thai origin, a new Pali coinage by the author is
provided, and clearly marked as such. A warning is also given where a
term has acquired a new meaning or its popular use in Thai has so
deviated from the original technical meaning in Pali that it might
easily cause misunderstanding.

Finally, the English-Thai Buddhist Dictionary in Part III is
essentially a glossary of Buddhist terms in English, encompassing those
terms whose use has more or less become established, along with those
deemed useful for serious students of Buddhism. Only Thai equivalents
are available, with no further explanations.

June 25, 2005

The Thai Dictionary

Gratitude to Venerable Bhante Phra Bhramagunabhorn and Dr.
Somseen Chanawangsa for sending the dictionary to us for the benefit of
many who access the Tipitaka.




http://www.tipitaka.org/hindi-docs
Home > Hindi Publications

Tipiṭaka Related Hindi Publications
by the Vipassana Research Institute

Hindi publications of Vipassana Research Institute related to the Tipitaka available online. Kindly download and install the Acrobat Reader
to enable you to access it. Clicking on the book links will take you to
the Table of contents and clicking on the topics will take you to the
page containing the respective topics.

1. Suttasaar in three volumes - Essence in short of the various suttas from the Tipitaka

2. Dhammapada Pali with hindi translation of this important book from the cannon is very valuable.

3. Dhammavani sangraha Inspiring couplets in pali with hindi translations.

4. Anguttara Nikaya - volume 1 - A Hindi translation of a part of the Sutta pitaka of the pali cannon



Buddha
http://www.tipitaka.org/english-docs
Home > English Publications

Tipiṭaka related English publications
by the Vipassana Research Institute

The Essence of Tipiṭaka: This book contains a gist of the contents of the Tipiṭaka.

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta: contains the Pali in Roman script with an English translation of this important sutta.



http://www.tipitaka.org/dutch-docs
Home > Nederlandstalige publicaties

Nederlandstalige publicaties m.b.t. de Tipiṭaka
door het Vipassana Research Institute

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta: bevat het Pali in Romaans schrift met een Nederlandse vertaling van deze belangrijke sutta.


Home > CST4

Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka Version 4.0 (CST4)

CST4 is a desktop client for browsing and searching the Pāli Canon. It is the successor to the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD 3.0 (CSCD3).

System requirements: Windows
XP, Vista, 7, 8 or 8.1. Prerequisites: .NET Framework 2.0, Windows
Installer. On Windows XP, complex script support must be enabled (see
below). The program uses about 350MB of disk space including the
Tipitaka data and search index.

Step 1:

The CST4 program requires the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 to run. Windows XP users, click here to
download it. Windows 7 and later includes the .NET Framework by
default. To ensure that it is installed on your computer, please go to
Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows features on
or off. In the list of features, scroll down to “.NET Framework 3.5.1″
and check it if it is not checked, then click OK.

Step 2:

Download the CST4 installer (40.9 MB)

To
start the installation, click on the .msi file that you downloaded. If
your version of Windows cannot run a .msi file, download the Windows Installer component from Microsoft and install.

To type Roman-script Unicode Pali, download and install a keyboard driver.

Enable
complex script support in Windows XP. Go to Control Panel ->
Regional and Language Options -> Languages -> Click the checkbox
“Install files for complex scripts including right to left languages
(including Thai)”. Then OK. More info…

To type in Devanagari and other Indic scripts, install the keyboard drivers included with Windows. Installation instructions: Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8.

Step 3:

To
run the program, click the “Chattha Sangayana Tipitaka 4.0” shortcut
created by the installer. The search index is generated the first time
the program runs. This can take up to 15 minutes.

To report bugs, make suggestions or request additional features, please send an email to the development team at help@tipitaka.org. Your input is highly appreciated.

Tipiṭaka Scripts 
Cyrillic Web
Devanagari Web | PDF
Gujarati Web
Kannada Web
Malayalam Web
Roman Web | PDF
Tamil Web
Telugu Web
Other Scripts 
(Bengali, Gurmukhi, Khmer, Myanmar, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan) 



comments (0)
04 LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007- (2656 Tue 19 Jun LESSON) Tipitaka Circarama Cinema To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 12:26 am





04
LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007- 

(2656 Tue 19 Jun  LESSON)
Tipitaka
Circarama Cinema
To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase

 from


Analytic Insight Net -

Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart


Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related NEWS through 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 
in
 105 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 





Paṭisambhidā
Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya




http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org
anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā



is
an Online GOOD NEWS CHANNEL FOR WELFARE, HAPPINESS AND PEACE FOR ALL
SOCIETIES Catering to more than 3000 Emails: 200 WhatsApp, Facebook and
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is the most Positive Energy of informative and research oriented site propagating the teachings of the Awakened One with Awareness the Buddha and on Techno-Politico-Socio Transformation and Economic Emancipation Movement followed by millions of people all over the world.


Rendering
exact translation as a lesson of this University in one’s mother tongue
to this Google Translation and propagation entitles to become a Stream

Enterer (Sottapanna) and to attain Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal.

Button Plant Green Butterfly E Mail Animation Clip

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sarvajanow@yahoo.co.in

04 LESSON Thu Jun 29 2007- http://www.tipitaka.org/






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BuddhaThis web site is based on the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana CD published by the Vipassana Research Institute.
Based at Dhamma Giri, Igatpuri, near Mumbai, India, the Vipassana
Research Institute also publishes literature & disseminates
information related to Vipassana Meditation Technique as taught by S.N.Goenka in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin.

Vipassana
is a universal, scientific method towards purifying the mind. It is the
practical essence of the teachings of the Buddha, who taught Dhamma -
the Universal Law of Nature.

The Pāḷi Tipiṭaka is now available
online in various scripts. Although all are in Unicode fonts, you may
need to install some fonts and make some changes to your system to view
the site correctly. 

Please read the help page carefully for more information on setting up your system and also on how to use this site.


New Desktop software: You can now download the entire Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka to run off your computer in offline mode. Click here for instructions.

New iOS web app: You can now navigate the Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana Tipitaka using your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Click here for instructions.

Older Operating systems: Vistors using Windows 95/98 may not be able to view Unicode texts as it is not fully supported by these operating systems. The older VRI Roman site is still available. To use the VRI Roman site you will need to install the VRI Roman Pali fonts. Alternatively you may download an image of the CSCD3 disc (208 MB) and burn your own copy of CSCD3.


In case of difficulties in viewing the Pāḷi Text or if you notice any other errors on this site, please write to help@tipitaka.org describing the problem.

Tipiṭaka Scripts 
Cyrillic Web
Devanagari Web | PDF
Gujarati Web
Kannada Web
Malayalam Web
Roman Web | PDF
Tamil Web
Telugu Web
Other Scripts 
(Bengali, Gurmukhi, Khmer, Myanmar, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan) 


To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase

Layout
Visitors
to enter the Prabuddha Bharat Pavilion through a large Prabuddha Bharat
gate. The courtyard to be dominated by a replica of Kushinara the
Temple of Eternal Bliss, which has to contain the entrance to
“Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat”, a Circle-Vision 360 deg movie
exploring Prabuddha Bharat’s history and scenery, as well as a museum
containing several ancient Prabuddha Bharat artifects. The courtyard
bordered by shops selling Prabuddha Bharat merchandise, and two Vegan
restaurants. The pavilion to be decorated with pond, a replica of
Lumbini pond.
The pavilion to be served as the backdrop for chanting music video of the song of “reflection, performed by Monks.
Attractions and services Attractions
Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat including Lumbini, Bodh Gaya, Saranath, Kushinara in circle vision 360deg.
Shoping
Dining
Live entertainment
Charecter Meet & Greets
Gallery
Pagoda for Meditation - Temple for Eternal Bliss.To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase
Layout
Visitors
to enter the Prabuddha Bharat Pavilion through a large Prabuddha Bharat
gate. The courtyard to be dominated by a replica of Kushinara the
Temple of Eternal Bliss, which has to contain the entrance to
“Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat”, a Circle-Vision 360 deg movie
exploring Prabuddha Bharat’s history and scenery, as well as a museum
containing several ancient Prabuddha Bharat artifects. The courtyard
bordered by shops selling Prabuddha Bharat merchandise, and two Vegan
restaurants. The pavilion to be decorated with pond, a replica of
Lumbini pond.
The pavilion to be served as the backdrop for chanting music video of the song of “reflection, performed by Monks.
Attractions and services Attractions
Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat including Lumbini, Bodh Gaya, Saranath, Kushinara in circle vision 360deg.
Shoping
Dining
Live entertainment
Charecter Meet & Greets
Gallery
Pagoda for Meditation - Temple for Eternal Bliss.


https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Circle-Vision+360%C2%B0

Circle-Vision 360°

Circle-Vision 360° is a film technique, refined by The Walt Disney Company, that uses nine cameras for nine big screens arranged in a circle. The cameras are usually mounted on top of an automobile for scenes through cities and highways, while films such as The Timekeeper use a static camera and many CGI effects. The first film was America the Beautiful (1955 version) in the Circarama theater, which would eventually become Circle-Vision theater in 1967.

It is used for a few attractions at Disney theme parks, such as Epcot’s O Canada!, Reflections of China, and Disneyland’s defunct America the Beautiful (1967 version), Wonders of China, and American Journeys, which were housed in the Circle-Vision theater in Tomorrowland.
At the 2011 D23 Expo, Disneyland Resort President George Kalogridis
announced that CircleVision would be making a return to Disneyland Park
with a new presentation of America the Beautiful in CircleVision 360,
though it is not currently known where the film will be presented (as
the original theater was replaced with another attraction), and whether
this will be a version of the original film or a new film with the same
name and concept.

By using an odd number
of screens, and a small space between them, a projector may be placed
in each gap, projecting across the space to a screen. The screens and
projectors are arranged above head level, and lean rails may be provided
for viewers to hold or to lean against while standing and viewing the
film.

Parks that use Circle-Vision technologyDisneyland Park
Magic Kingdom
  • Grand opening: November 25, 1971 (America The Beautiful)
  • Closing Date: February 26, 2006 (The Timekeeper)
  • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
  • Location: Tomorrowland
  • Formal Names of Attraction
    • Circle-Vision 360
    • Metropolis Science Center
  • List of Films Shown
    • America the Beautiful (1971-1974, 1975-1979)
    • Magic Carpet ‘Round the World (1974-1975, 1979-1984)
    • American Journeys (September 15, 1984 – January 9, 1994)
    • The Timekeeper (November 21, 1994 – February 26, 2006)
  • Former Sponsors
    • Monsanto (Carpets)
    • Black & Decker
  • Followed by
Epcot
Tokyo Disneyland
  • Grand opening: April 15, 1983
  • Closed: September 1, 2002
  • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
  • Location: Tomorrowland
  • Formal Names of Attraction
    • Circle-Vision 360
    • Visionarium
  • List of Films Shown
    • Magic Carpet ‘Round the World
    • American Journeys
    • Visionarium (From Time to Time)
  • Sponsors
    • Fujifilm
Disneyland Paris
  • Grand opening: April 12, 1992
  • Closed: September 2004
  • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
  • Location: Discoveryland
  • Formal Name of Attraction
    • Le Visionarium
  • List of Films Shown
    • Le Visionarium
  • Sponsors
Other usesExpo 64
  • Grand opening: April 30, 1964
  • Closed: October 25, 1964
  • Designer: Ernst A. Heiniger
  • Location: Transportation Pavilion, Expo 64, Lausanne
  • Formal Name of Attraction
    • “Magic of the rails, magie du rail, Zauber der Schiene”
  • Sponsors
  • Notes: It has been unseen since 1964.
Expo 67
  • Grand opening: April 28, 1967
  • Closed: October 29, 1967
  • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
  • Location: Telephone Pavilion, Expo 67, Montreal
  • Formal Name of Attraction
    • “Canada 67″
  • List of Films Shown
    • Canada ‘67” – Directed by Robert Barclay. Description from the Expo’67 Guide book: “You’re on centre stage for the RCMP
      Musical Ride… on centre ice for hockey… on the track at the
      Stampede! CIRCLE-VISION 360° surrounds you with all the fun and
      excitement of Canada’s most thrilling events and its scenic beauty. And
      then, take your children to the Enchanted Forest…see exciting new
      communication services for the future… all in the Telephone Pavilion!”[1]
  • Sponsors
    • The Telephone Association of Canada
  • Notes: The “B-25″ airplane was used to film the aerial shots.[2]
  • This
    is one of the rarest Circle-Vision movies, for except for a brief
    appearance in January 1974 at Magic Kingdom during their “Salute to
    Canada”, it has been unseen since 1967. The film was the inspiration for
    the original “O Canada!” film that played at Epcot from 1982-2007.


    • Man and His World – after Expo 67
      In 1970 this theater became the USA Pavilion, presenting the film
      “America the Beautiful”, with a post-show exhibit of Americana including
      a well-guarded Moon rock.
    Expo 86
    • Grand opening: May 2, 1986
    • Closed: October 13, 1986
    • Designer: ??
    • Location: Telecom Canada Pavilion, Expo 86, Vancouver
    • Formal Name of Attraction
      • “Telecom Canada”
    • Film Shown
      • “Portraits of Canada/Images du Canada”
    • Sponsors
    • Notes – Following Expo, the movie played temporarily at the Canada pavilion at EPCOT Center.
    Other

    French cinematic pioneers toyed with the technology from 1884, leading to Cinéorama. Another system (developed in the 21st century) substantially similar is in use at the site of the Terracotta Army exhibit at Xian, China. The Badaling Great Wall near Beijing, China has a Circle-Vision theater featuring scenes from the Great Wall of China.

    See also
    References
    1. Official Expo 67 guide book, page 178. Toronto: Maclean-Hunter Publishing Co. Ltd., 1967.
    2. “Expo 67 - Plane used to film “Canada 67″ - Disney Circle Vision 360″.





    04
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    To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase

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    To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase

    Layout
    Visitors
    to enter the Prabuddha Bharat Pavilion through a large Prabuddha Bharat
    gate. The courtyard to be dominated by a replica of Kushinara the
    Temple of Eternal Bliss, which has to contain the entrance to
    “Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat”, a Circle-Vision 360 deg movie
    exploring Prabuddha Bharat’s history and scenery, as well as a museum
    containing several ancient Prabuddha Bharat artifects. The courtyard
    bordered by shops selling Prabuddha Bharat merchandise, and two Vegan
    restaurants. The pavilion to be decorated with pond, a replica of
    Lumbini pond.
    The pavilion to be served as the backdrop for chanting music video of the song of “reflection, performed by Monks.
    Attractions and services Attractions
    Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat including Lumbini, Bodh Gaya, Saranath, Kushinara in circle vision 360deg.
    Shoping
    Dining
    Live entertainment
    Charecter Meet & Greets
    Gallery
    Pagoda for Meditation - Temple for Eternal Bliss.To create Prabuddha Bharat pavilion -themed pavilion to be part of Wold Showcase
    Layout
    Visitors
    to enter the Prabuddha Bharat Pavilion through a large Prabuddha Bharat
    gate. The courtyard to be dominated by a replica of Kushinara the
    Temple of Eternal Bliss, which has to contain the entrance to
    “Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat”, a Circle-Vision 360 deg movie
    exploring Prabuddha Bharat’s history and scenery, as well as a museum
    containing several ancient Prabuddha Bharat artifects. The courtyard
    bordered by shops selling Prabuddha Bharat merchandise, and two Vegan
    restaurants. The pavilion to be decorated with pond, a replica of
    Lumbini pond.
    The pavilion to be served as the backdrop for chanting music video of the song of “reflection, performed by Monks.
    Attractions and services Attractions
    Reflections of Prabuddha Bharat including Lumbini, Bodh Gaya, Saranath, Kushinara in circle vision 360deg.
    Shoping
    Dining
    Live entertainment
    Charecter Meet & Greets
    Gallery
    Pagoda for Meditation - Temple for Eternal Bliss.


    https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Circle-Vision+360%C2%B0

    Circle-Vision 360°

    Circle-Vision 360° is a film technique, refined by The Walt Disney Company, that uses nine cameras for nine big screens arranged in a circle. The cameras are usually mounted on top of an automobile for scenes through cities and highways, while films such as The Timekeeper use a static camera and many CGI effects. The first film was America the Beautiful (1955 version) in the Circarama theater, which would eventually become Circle-Vision theater in 1967.

    It is used for a few attractions at Disney theme parks, such as Epcot’s O Canada!, Reflections of China, and Disneyland’s defunct America the Beautiful (1967 version), Wonders of China, and American Journeys, which were housed in the Circle-Vision theater in Tomorrowland.
    At the 2011 D23 Expo, Disneyland Resort President George Kalogridis
    announced that CircleVision would be making a return to Disneyland Park
    with a new presentation of America the Beautiful in CircleVision 360,
    though it is not currently known where the film will be presented (as
    the original theater was replaced with another attraction), and whether
    this will be a version of the original film or a new film with the same
    name and concept.

    By using an odd number
    of screens, and a small space between them, a projector may be placed
    in each gap, projecting across the space to a screen. The screens and
    projectors are arranged above head level, and lean rails may be provided
    for viewers to hold or to lean against while standing and viewing the
    film.

    Parks that use Circle-Vision technologyDisneyland Park
    Magic Kingdom
    • Grand opening: November 25, 1971 (America The Beautiful)
    • Closing Date: February 26, 2006 (The Timekeeper)
    • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
    • Location: Tomorrowland
    • Formal Names of Attraction
      • Circle-Vision 360
      • Metropolis Science Center
    • List of Films Shown
      • America the Beautiful (1971-1974, 1975-1979)
      • Magic Carpet ‘Round the World (1974-1975, 1979-1984)
      • American Journeys (September 15, 1984 – January 9, 1994)
      • The Timekeeper (November 21, 1994 – February 26, 2006)
    • Former Sponsors
      • Monsanto (Carpets)
      • Black & Decker
    • Followed by
    Epcot
    Tokyo Disneyland
    • Grand opening: April 15, 1983
    • Closed: September 1, 2002
    • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
    • Location: Tomorrowland
    • Formal Names of Attraction
      • Circle-Vision 360
      • Visionarium
    • List of Films Shown
      • Magic Carpet ‘Round the World
      • American Journeys
      • Visionarium (From Time to Time)
    • Sponsors
      • Fujifilm
    Disneyland Paris
    • Grand opening: April 12, 1992
    • Closed: September 2004
    • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
    • Location: Discoveryland
    • Formal Name of Attraction
      • Le Visionarium
    • List of Films Shown
      • Le Visionarium
    • Sponsors
    Other usesExpo 64
    • Grand opening: April 30, 1964
    • Closed: October 25, 1964
    • Designer: Ernst A. Heiniger
    • Location: Transportation Pavilion, Expo 64, Lausanne
    • Formal Name of Attraction
      • “Magic of the rails, magie du rail, Zauber der Schiene”
    • Sponsors
    • Notes: It has been unseen since 1964.
    Expo 67
    • Grand opening: April 28, 1967
    • Closed: October 29, 1967
    • Designer: Walt Disney Imagineering
    • Location: Telephone Pavilion, Expo 67, Montreal
    • Formal Name of Attraction
      • “Canada 67″
    • List of Films Shown
      • Canada ‘67” – Directed by Robert Barclay. Description from the Expo’67 Guide book: “You’re on centre stage for the RCMP
        Musical Ride… on centre ice for hockey… on the track at the
        Stampede! CIRCLE-VISION 360° surrounds you with all the fun and
        excitement of Canada’s most thrilling events and its scenic beauty. And
        then, take your children to the Enchanted Forest…see exciting new
        communication services for the future… all in the Telephone Pavilion!”[1]
  • Sponsors
    • The Telephone Association of Canada
  • Notes: The “B-25″ airplane was used to film the aerial shots.[2]
  • This
    is one of the rarest Circle-Vision movies, for except for a brief
    appearance in January 1974 at Magic Kingdom during their “Salute to
    Canada”, it has been unseen since 1967. The film was the inspiration for
    the original “O Canada!” film that played at Epcot from 1982-2007.


    • Man and His World – after Expo 67
      In 1970 this theater became the USA Pavilion, presenting the film
      “America the Beautiful”, with a post-show exhibit of Americana including
      a well-guarded Moon rock.
    Expo 86
    • Grand opening: May 2, 1986
    • Closed: October 13, 1986
    • Designer: ??
    • Location: Telecom Canada Pavilion, Expo 86, Vancouver
    • Formal Name of Attraction
      • “Telecom Canada”
    • Film Shown
      • “Portraits of Canada/Images du Canada”
    • Sponsors
    • Notes – Following Expo, the movie played temporarily at the Canada pavilion at EPCOT Center.
    Other

    French cinematic pioneers toyed with the technology from 1884, leading to Cinéorama. Another system (developed in the 21st century) substantially similar is in use at the site of the Terracotta Army exhibit at Xian, China. The Badaling Great Wall near Beijing, China has a Circle-Vision theater featuring scenes from the Great Wall of China.

    See also
    References
    1. Official Expo 67 guide book, page 178. Toronto: Maclean-Hunter Publishing Co. Ltd., 1967.
    2. “Expo 67 - Plane used to film “Canada 67″ - Disney Circle Vision 360″.
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