Discovery of Metteyya the Awakened One with Awareness Universe(FOAINDMAOAU)
From Kushinara Nibbana Bhumi Pagoda in
 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES in BUDDHA'S own Words through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgat White Home 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL 3rd Stage, Punya Bhumi Bengaluru- Magadhi Karnataka State -PRABUDDHA BHARAT
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10/26/20
LESSON 3487 Tue 27 Oct 2020 DO GOOD PURIFY MIND - AWAKENED ONE WITH AWARENESS Free Online Research and Practice University for Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU) For The Welfare, Happiness, Peace of All Sentient and Non-Sentient Beings and for them to Attain Eternal Peace as Final Goal. at KUSHINARA NIBBANA BHUMI PAGODA-is a 18 feet Dia All White Pagoda with a table or, but be sure to having above head level based on the usual use of the room. in 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES and planning to project Therevada Tipitaka in Buddha’s own words and Important Places like Lumbini, Bodhgaya,Saranath, Kushinara, Etc., in 3D 360 degree circle vision akin to Circarama At WHITE HOME 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL III Stage, Prabuddha Bharat Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru Magadhi Karnataka State PRABUDDHA BHARAT May you, your family members and all sentient and non sentient beings be ever happy, well and secure! Aṅga Sutta — Factors —in 05) Classical Pāḷi,29) Classical English,Roman, 27) Classical Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk, 28) Classical Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands, 29) Classical English,Roman 30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto, 31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel, 32) Classical Filipino klassikaline filipiinlane, 33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen, 34) Classical French- Français classique, 35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk, 36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego, 37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული, 38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch, 39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά, 40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી, 41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl, 42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa, 43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian, 44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית 45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob, 46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar, 47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku, 48) Classical Igbo,Klassískt Igbo, 49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik, 50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach, 51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico, 52) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語, 53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa, 54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ, 55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ, 56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ, 57) Classical Kinyarwanda 58) Classical Korean-고전 한국어, 59) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî), 60) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз, 61) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ, 62) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin, 63) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda, 64) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba, 65) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch, 66) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски, 67) Classical Malagasy,класичен малгашки, 68) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik, 69) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം, 70) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti, 71) Classical Maori-Maori Maori, 72) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी, 73) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол, 74) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ), 75) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा), 76) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk, 77) Classical Odia (Oriya),78) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو 79) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی 80) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski, 81) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico, 82) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ, 83) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc, 84) Classical Russian-Классический русский,
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka
Posted by: site admin @ 5:53 pm
LESSON 3487 Tue 27 Oct  2020
DO GOOD PURIFY MIND - AWAKENED ONE WITH AWARENESS

Free Online Research and Practice University
for

Discovery of  Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU) 

For The Welfare, Happiness, Peace of All Sentient and Non-Sentient Beings and for them to Attain Eternal Peace as Final Goal.

at

KUSHINARA NIBBANA BHUMI PAGODA-is a 18 feet Dia All White Pagoda with a table or, but be sure to having above head level based on the usual use of the room.

in
116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES and planning to project Therevada Tipitaka in
Buddha’s own words and Important Places like Lumbini, Bodhgaya,Saranath,
Kushinara, Etc., in 3D 360 degree circle vision akin to

Circarama

At



WHITE HOME

668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL III Stage,

Prabuddha Bharat Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru

Magadhi Karnataka State

PRABUDDHA BHARAT

May you, your family members and all sentient and non sentient beings be ever happy, well and secure!



Aṅga Sutta

— Factors —in 05) Classical Pāḷi,29) Classical English,Roman,

27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,
28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,
29) Classical English,Roman
30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,

32) Classical Filipino klassikaline filipiinlane,
33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

34) Classical French- Français classique,

35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,

36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,
37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,
38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,
39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,
40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,


41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,
42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,
43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,

44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית
45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,

46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,
48) Classical Igbo,Klassískt Igbo,

49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,
51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,
52) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,
53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,
54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,
55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,

57) Classical Kinyarwanda
58) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,
59) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),

60) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,

61) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
62) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,

63) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,

64) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,
65) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,

66) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
67) Classical Malagasy,класичен малгашки,
68) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,
69) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

70) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,
71) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
72) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,
73) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,

74) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

75) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),
76) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,
77) Classical Odia (Oriya),78) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو
79) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
80) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,
81) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
82) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,
83) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,
84) Classical Russian-Классический русский,

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Aṅga Sutta

— Factors —in 05) Classical Pāḷi,29) Classical English,Roman,
https://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samyutta/maha/sn55-050.html


SN 55.50 (S v 404)

Aṅga Sutta


— Factors —
[aṅga]

The four sotāpattiyaṅgas (factors for stream-entry).



Note: info·bubbles on every Pali word



05) Classical Pāḷi



29) Classical English,Roman



Cattār·imāni, bhikkhave, sotāpatti·y·aṅgāni. Katamāni cattāri? Sappurisa·saṃsevo, saddhamma·s·savanaṃ, yoniso·manasikāro, dhamm·ānudhamma·p·paṭipatti. Imāni kho, bhikkhave, cattāri sotāpatti·y·aṅgānī ti.


These, bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry. Which four? Association with good men, hearing the correct Dhamma, appropriate reflection and practice in accordance with the Dhamma. These, bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry.



05) Classical Pāḷi


Cattār·imāni, bhikkhave, sotāpatti·y·aṅgāni. Katamāni cattāri? Sappurisa·saṃsevo, saddhamma·s·savanaṃ, yoniso·manasikāro, dhamm·ānudhamma·p·paṭipatti. Imāni kho, bhikkhave, cattāri sotāpatti·y·aṅgānī ti.




29) Classical English,Roman,

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Guardian Of The Sasana (A Buddhist Song by the Wayfarers)
ipohteh
13.7K subscribers
SASANARAKKHA
Music: Victor Wee
Lyrics: Florence Tan
Guardian of the Sasana
At the edge of the forest
Where the spring water flows
In search of Nirvana
That is where I would go
Watching life’s little dramas
With a calm repose
At the edge of the forest
That’s where I would go
Let us practice the Dharma
In our silent heart
Worry not of the future
Gently let go the past
Sit in deep contemplation
In one-pointedness
And in that soft moment
There’s just timelessness
At the edge of the forest
There are hills high and low
There the Dharma seed’s planted
And the Sangha shall grow
Guardian of the Sasana
Sasanarakkha
Upholding the Dharma
For beings near and far
Long live the Sasana
Springing from Buddha’s light
Through the Dharma vinaya
And the Truth shining bright
Worthy is your mission
Stand tall in your pride
Lofty is your vision
Spread the Law far and wide
Lofty is your vision
Spread the Law far and wide
Guardian Of The Sasana (A Buddhist Song by the Wayfarers)

https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebidx.htm

English Articles

Yo ca vassasatam jive
apassam dhammamuttamam
Ekaham jivitam seyyo
passato dhammamuttamam
(Dhammapada, 115) Though one should live a hundred years
not seeing Dhamma supreme,
yet better is life for a single day
seeing Dhamma supreme.
What is Buddhism? (Buddhist Society of Western Australia)
Buddhism in a Nutshell. Venerable Narada Mahathera
Basic Buddhism - A Modern Introduction to the Buddha’s Teaching. V. A. Gunasekara

What is Theravada Buddhism? John Bullitt
What is Theravada? Maung Kyauk Seinn
Theravada - Mahayana Buddhism. Venerable W. Rahula Mahathera
What is Theravada Buddhism? V. A. Gunasekara

Theravada Buddhism in Vietnam. Binh Anson

1. Books:

(*) Chanting Book (with accompanied sound files). The Buddhist Society of Western Australia
(*) Buddhist Dictionary - Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines. Venerable Nyanatiloka Mahathera
(*) Concise Pali-English Buddhist Dictionary. Venerable Buddhadatta Mahathera
(*) Concise Pali-Vietnamese Buddhist Dictionary. Venerable Buu-Chon Mahathera  
(*) English-Pali Dictionary. Metta Net, Sri Lanka.  
(*) Small Pali-English Glossary of Buddhist Terms. Bhikkhu Bodhi

(*) Word of the Buddha. Venerable Nyanatiloka Mahathera
(*) What Buddhists Believe. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Human Life and Problems. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) The Buddha and His Teachings. Venerable Narada Mahathera

(*) The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to the End of Suffering. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Eightfold Path for the Housholder. Ten Talks by Jack Kornfield
(*) Eight Talks on Vipassana Meditation. Sayadaw U Janaka
(*) Mindfulness in Plain English. Venerable H. Gunaratana Mahathera
(*) Living Meditation, Living Insight. Dr. Thynn Thynn
(*) The Jhanas in Theravada Buddhist Meditation. Venerable H. Gunaratana Mahathera.
(*) A Swift Pair of Messengers. Bhikkhu Sujato.

(*) Right View - The Sammaditthi Sutta and its Commentary. Translated by Bhikkhu Nanamoli, edited and revised by Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Gentle Way of Buddhist Meditation - Dhamma Talks by Godwin Samararatne, Hongkong, 1997
(*) Beyond Belief. A. L. De Silva

(*) Good Question, Good Answer. Bhikkhu S. Dhammika
(*) A Young People’s Life of the Buddha. Bhikkhu Silacara
(*) The Life of the Buddha. Radhika Abeysekera
(*) Relatives and Disciples of the Buddha. Radhika Abeysekera

(*) The Abhidharma. Peter Della Santina
(*) Abhidhamma in daily life. Nina Van Gorkom
(*) The Mind in Early Buddhism. Venerable Thich Minh-Thanh.

(*) Here and Now - A Series of 10 Dhamma Talks. Ayya Khema.
(*) All of Us - Beset by Birth, Decay and Death - A Series of 12 Dhamma Talks. Ayya Khema.
(*) Beginnings: The Pali sutras. Samanera Bodhesako.
(*) Living Dhamma - A Collection of 7 Talks. Venerable Ajahn Chah.
(*) Key to Liberation and The Path to Peace - Talks on Dhamma Practice. Venerable Ajahn Chah.
(*) The Concept of Personality Revealed Through The Pancanikaya. Venerable Thich Chon-Thien.
(*) Starting Out Small - A Collection of Talks for Beginning Meditators. Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo.
(*) A Discourse on Paticcasamuppada (Dependent Origination). Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw.  
(*) A Discourse on Malukyaputta Sutta. Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw.
(*) Handbook for Mankind. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa.
(*) The Coming Buddha, Ariya Metteyya. Sayagyi U Chit Tin.

(*) Buddhism as the Foundation of Science. Bhikkhu Prayudh Payutto
(*) Buddhist Outlook on Daily Life. Nina van Gorkom
(*) Essential Themes of Buddhist Lectures. Venerable Sayadaw Ashin U Thittila  
(*) Seeing the way. Various Western disciples of Venerable Ajahn Chah.
(*) A Technique of Living. Leonard A. Bullen.
(*) Milindapanha and Nagasenabhikshu Sutra - A Comparative Study. Bhikkhu Thich Minh Chau.
(*) Catupatisambhida in Theravada Buddhism (The Fourfold Analytical Knowledge In Pali Literature). Bhikkhu Kusalaguna.

2. Suttas (Discourses):

(*) Overview of the Pali Canon. Venerable Narada Mahathera
(*) Pali Text Society: Information on Pali Literature and Publications
(*) The Buddhist Scriptures. Sayadaw U Sobhana
(*) Guide to the Tipitaka. U Ko Lay
(*) List of Commentaries to the Tipitaka.
(*) Beyond the Tipitaka - A Field Guide to Post-canonical Pali Literature. John Bullitt
(*) Chronology of the Pali Canon. Bimala Churn Law.
(*) How old is the Suttapitaka? The relative value of textual and epigraphical sources for the study of early Indian Buddhism. Alexander Wynne.

(*) Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion
(*) The Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path
(*) The Noble Eightfold Path
(*) The Abhidhamma Philosophy: Its Estimation in the Past and its value for the Present. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahathera

(*) The Majjhima Nikaya (Collection of Middle Length Discourses): 152 suttas, translated by Sister Upalavanna.
(*) Dhammapada Stories, translated by Daw Mya Tin.
(*) The Mahavamsa - The Great Chronicle of Lanka from 6th Century BC to 4th Century AD. Translated by Wilhelm Geiger.

(*) Greater Discourse on Foundations of Mindfulness
(*) Discourse on Mindfulness of Breathing (Ananda Sutta)
(*) Discourse on Mindfulness of Breathing (Anapanasati Sutta)
(*) Discourse on Mindfulness Immersed in the Body (Kayagata-sati Sutta)
(*) Factors of Concentration
(*) Four Grounds of Mindfulness (Nian Chu Jing, Chinese Madhyama-Agama)
(*) One Way in (Yi Ru Dao Jing, Chinese Ekottara-agama)
(*) The Path to Enlightenment - Extracts from the Suttas

(*) The Eight-Precept Observance. Somdet Phra Buddhaghosacariya (Nanavara Thera)
(*) The 5 Precepts. BuddhaDharma web site
(*) Discipline and Conventions of Theravada Buddhist Renunciate Communities - A Guide for the Western Sangha
(*) The Bhikkhus’ Rules: FAQs. Bhikkhu Ariyesako
(*) The ordination procedures and some Vinaya rules. Chanmyay Sayadaw Ashin Janakabhivamsa.
(*) Bhikkhuni Patimokkha - English translation.
(*) A Life Free from Money: Information about the Money Rules for Buddhist Monks and Nuns. Bhikkhu Dhamminda.

(*) Understanding Vinaya. Ajahn Chah
(*) Vinaya: Ownership and Administration of Monasteries. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: Monks and Money. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: The Four Disrobing Offences. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: Wrong Livelihood. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: Ordination of Women. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: Monks and Women, Nuns and Men. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: May a monk act as a doctor? Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: The Ordination Ceremony of a Monk. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: What the Buddha said about eating meat. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Vinaya: The time and place for eating. Ajahn Brahmavamso.

(*) Last days of the Buddha. Binh Anson
(*) Twenty Difficult Things
(*) Discourse on the Future Dangers
(*) Discourse on Dhamma Investigation: Kalama Sutta
(*) A look at the Kalama Sutta. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Shorter Discourse on Voidness (Culasunnata Sutta - Majjhima Nikaya 121) . Translated by Bhikkhu Nyanamoli and also by Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Subha, The Enlightened Nun. Panadure Vajira Dasasilmatha
(*) Similes of the Raft and the Snake-catcher (Alagaddupama Sutta, Majjhima Nikaya). Venerable Henepola Gunaratana Mahathera
(*) Samadhi Sutta - Concentration (Tranquillity and Insight)
(*) Culavedalla Sutta - The Shorter Set of Questions-and-Answers.
(*) The Four Foundations of Mindfulness: A Summary. Venerable Sayadaw U Sīlānanda.

(*) Aditta-pariyaya Sutta - The Fire Sermon
(*) Khuddakapatha - The Short Passages
(*) Metta Sutta (Discourse on Loving-kindness ). U Nandiya
(*) Selections from the Sutta Nipata. (Translated from the Pali by John D. Ireland)
(*) The Living Message of the Dhammapada. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Sutra on Knowing the Better Way to Live Alone. Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh
(*) The Buddha’s Advice to Meghiya (Meghiya Sutta). Sister Ajahn Candasiri
(*) The Questions of King Milinda (Selected Passages)
(*) The Buddha’s advice on the Path. Extracts from the Sutta Pitaka
(*) The Buddha’s general advice to lay followers. Extracts from the Sutta Pitaka
(*) On the Ariyaavaasa Sutta (Discourse on the Abode of the Noble Ones). Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw.

(*) How old is the Suttapitaka? The relative value of textual and epigraphical sources for the study of early Indian Buddhism. Alexander Wynne.
(*) The Home of Pali. U Razinda.
(*) The Advent of Pali Literature in Thailand. Ven. H. Saddhatissa.

3. Meditation:

(*) 8 Talks on Vipassana Meditation. Sayadaw U Janaka
(*) Introduction to Insight Meditation. Amaravati Buddhist Centre, U.K.
(*) Mindfulness with Breathing. Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
(*) Insight Meditation - Basic and progressive stages. Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw
(*) Practical Advice for Meditators. Bhikkhu Khantipalo.
(*) The Anapanasati Sutta — A Practical Guide to Midfulness of Breathing and Tranquil Wisdom Meditation. Bhikkhu Vimalaramsi.
(*) The Bare-Bones Instructions to “Mindfulness of Breathing”, taken from the Anapanasati Sutta, #118 in the Majjhima Nikaya. Bhikkhu Vimalaramsi.

(*) The Basic Method of Meditation. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Travelogue to the four jhanas. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Satipatthana: The Fourfold Focus od Mindfulness. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) The Five Hindrances (Nivarana). Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Using non-self to let go. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Deep insight. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Meditation: The Heart of Buddhism. Ajahn Brahmavamso  
(*) The quality of mindfulness. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Using variety to “freshen up” our meditation. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Joy at last to know there is no happiness in the world. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) The bliss of letting go. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) The ending of things - A discourse on “non-self”. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Buddhism, The only real science. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Cultivate Tranquility, Harvest Insight. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Practising In The World. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Bāhiya’s Teaching: In the Seen is just the Seen. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) I know, but I don’t know: The contemplation of death. Ajahn Brahmavamso.

(*) The Path to Peace. Ajahn Chah.
(*) A Gift of Dhamma. Ajahn Chah.
(*) Samma Samadhi — Detachment Within Activity. Ajahn Chah.

(*) Buddho. Phra Ajahn Thate Desaransi
(*) Eight Types of Knowledge. Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo.
(*) Tranquillity and Insight. Ajahn Maha Boowa Nanasampanno. Translated by Bhikkhu Thanissaro.
(*) The Wisdom of Samadhi. Ajahn Pannavaddho
(*) Timeless and True. Ajahn Fuang Jotiko
(*) Crossing the Ocean of Life. Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
(*) The Fundamentals of Meditation. Ajahn Plien Panyapatipo
(*) Simply So. Dhamma Teachings of Luang Poo Sim Buddhacaro
(*) Ajahn’s Sao Teaching
(*) Jhanas, Concentration, and Wisdom. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) The Path of Concentration and Mindfulness. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) One Tool Among Many — The Place of Vipassana in Buddhist Practice. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Using meditation to deal with Pain, Illness and Death. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) A Guided Meditation. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Basic Breath Meditation Instructions. Bhikkhu Thanissaro.
(*) Jhana Not by the Numbers. Bhikkhu Thanissaro.

(*) Noticing space. Ajahn Sumedho.
(*) Only one breath. Ajahn Sumedho.
(*) Samatha and Vipassana Meditation. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) Right attitude of acceptance. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) The Mystery of the Breath Nimitta, or The Case of the Missing Simile. Bhikkhu Sona
(*) Meditation of the Breath. Ajahn Pasanno
(*) A Fistful of Sand. Ajahn Suwat Suvaco
(*) Right Attitude. Ajahn Suwat Suvaco
(*) Disenchantment. Ajahn Suwat Suvaco
(*) Right Concentration. Ajahn Suwat Suvaco.
(*) Samadhi for Liberation. Ajahn Anan Akincano.

(*) Upasika Kee Nanayon and the Social Dynamic of  Theravadin Buddhist Practice. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Condensed Breath Meditation. Kor Khao Suan Luang (Kee Nanayon)
(*) Breath Meditation Condensed. Upasika Kee Nanayon
(*) Looking inward. Upasika Kee Nanayon
(*) Reading the Mind. Upasika Kee Nanayon

(*) Contemplation of Feelings. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahathera
(*) Benefits of Long-term Meditation. Bhante H. Gunaratana
(*) Sati - Mindfulness. Bhante H. Gutanaratana
(*) Mindfulness of Feeling. Bhante H. Gunaratana
(*) Practical Vipassana. Bhante H. Gunaratana

(*) Instructions to Insight meditation. Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw
(*) Satipatthana and Vipassana Meditation. Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw
(*) Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw - A Biographical Sketch
(*) The Benefits of Walking Meditation. Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) Introduction to Vipassana Meditation. Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) Meditation Instructions (For Loving-kindness Meditation and Vipassana Meditation). Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) The Four Foundations of Mindfulness (A Summary). Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) Access and Fixed Concentration. Bhikkhu Sujivo
(*) Conceit and Meditation. Bhikkhu Sujivo
(*) Meditating at Home. Bhikkhu Pannyavaro
(*) Anapana Sati: Meditation on Breathing. Mahathera Nauyane Ariyadhamma

(*) Practical Guidelines for Vipassana. Ayya Kheminda
(*) The Meditative Mind. Ayya Khema.
(*) Meditating on No-Self. Ayya Khema.

(*) Basic Insight Meditation. Compiled by Derek Leong
(*) The Benefits of Meditations and Sacrifice. Aung San Suu Kyi
(*) Working with Anger. Michelle McDonald
(*) Mindfulness and Compassion. Adrian Bint
(*) Introduction to Mental Culture. Buddhist Cultural Center, Sri Lanka
(*) Buddhist Meditation. Francis Story
(*) Children’s Direct Seeing. Dr. Thynn Thynn
(*) Even the Best Meditators Have Old Wounds to Heal. Jack Kornfield
(*) Experiences in Meditation. Chris Kang
(*) Beginning Insight Meditation. Dorothy Figen

(*) Control and freedom: The structure of Buddhist meditation in the Paali suttas. Donald K. Swearer
(*) The Universal Teaching of the Buddha. S.N. Goenka
(*) Don’t You Teach Buddhism? An Interview with S.N. Goenka.
(*) Why Meditation isn’t Psychotherapy. Patrick Kearney
(*) A Buddhist Pilgrim’s Progress. Daw Khin Myo Chit  
(*) Formless Meditation. A roundtable discussion with Ajahn Sumedho, Patricia Dai-en Bennage, Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche and Gaylon Ferguson.
(*) The Bearable Irritation of Being. Ajahn Sumedho.
(*) Jhāna and Lokuttarajjhāna. Brahmāli Bhikkhu.
(*) Satipatthāna & Samādhi. Bhikkhu Bramāli.
(*) Sammasati: An Exposition of Right Mindfulness.  Ven. P. A. Payutto.

(*) Toward a theory of the relation between Tranquility and Insight. Ethan Mills.

4. Other Dhamma Essays:

(*) What is Buddhism? (Buddhist Society of W.A.)
(*) Questions and Answers on Buddhism. Yew Han Hee (1995)
(*) Introduction to Buddhism. Mike Butler
(*) What is Buddhism? U Thittila
(*) Basic Buddhism - A Modern Introduction to the Buddha’s Teaching. V. A. Gunasekara
(*) Buddhism in a Nutshell. Venerable Narada Mahathera
(*) The Dhamma Tree. R.P. Hayes
(*) The Way of The Buddha. The Buddhist Society, U.K.
(*) Buddhism 101 - Be a lamp upon yourself. Phor Kark See Temple, Singapore
(*) Buddhism - An Introduction. Graeme Lyall
(*) What Buddhism is. U Ba Khin
(*) What is Theravada Buddhism? V. A. Gunasekara

(*) FAQs on Buddhist culture. BuddhaNet
(*) FAQs - Talk.Religion.Buddhism newsgroup. John Kahila (1996)

(*) Sectarianism Disclaimer. S. Dharmamita
(*) Theravada and Mahayana. Venerable W. Rahula Mahathera
(*) Mahayana, Hinayana, Theravada
(*) The myth of Hinayana. Kåre A. Lie
(*) Mahayana and Hinayana. Venerable Abhinyana

(*) Two Main Schools of Buddhism. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) The Bodhisattva Ideal in Theravada. Jeffrey Samuels
(*) Theravada - Mahayana Buddhism. Venerable W. Rahula Mahathera
(*) Bodhisattva Ideal in Buddhism. Venerable W. Rahula Mahathera
(*) What is Theravada? Maung Kyauk Seinn
(*) Brief History of the Great Councils. Ministry of Religious Affairs, Myanmar
(*) Buddhist Councils. Venerable Rewata Dhamma

(*) The Meaning of Puja (Offerings). Buddhist Society of Western Australia
(*) Puja. Ajahn Sucitto
(*) On Vesak Day 2541 (1997). Venerable Thich Bao Lac
(*) The Significance of Vesak. Bhikkhu Mahinda
(*) Vesakha Puja. Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
(*) Vassa (Rains Retreat) and Kathina (Robe Offering) Ceremony

(*) Environmental Protection. Venerable Thich Tri Quang (1996)
(*) Non-grasping and Deliverance from Suffering. Lieu Phap
(*) Our Modern World’s Problems. Venerable Thich Bao Lac (1996)
(*) Thao-Duong Zen School: The Zen-Pure Land Union and Modern Vietnamese Buddhism. Venerable Thich Thien An
(*) Five principles for a new global moral order. Venerable Thich Minh Chau

(*) On Vegetarianism. Compiled by Binh Anson
(*) What the Buddha said about eating meat. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Buddhism and Vegetarianism. Ajahn Jagaro
(*) Buddhism and Vegetarianism: The Rationale for the Buddha’s Views on the Consumption of Meat. V. A. Gunasekara
(*) Are you “Herbivore” or “Carnivore”? Jan Sanjivaputta
(*) Vegetarianism. Venerable K. S. Dhammananda Mahathera

(*) Ajahn Chah’s Wisdom
(*) Right Practice — Steady Practice. Ajahn Chah
(*) Our real home - A talk to an aging lay disciple approaching death. Ajahn Chah
(*) Ajahn Chah Subhatto: An Appreciation & Personal Recollection. Ajahn Khemadhammo
(*) Understanding Dukkha. Ajahn Chah.

(*) Being nobody. Ajahn Sumedho
(*) Listening to Thought. Ajahn Sumedho
(*) Beyond the Self Position. Ajahn Sumedho
(*) The Human Family. Ajahn Sumedho
(*) Is Buddhism A Religion? Ajahn Sumedho
(*) Ajahn Sumedho Interviewed. Interview by Roger Wheeler

(*) Going for Refuge. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) The Healing Power of the Precepts. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Emptiness. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Affirming the Truths of the Heart - The Buddhist Teachings on Samvega and Pasada. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) The road to Nirvana is paved with skillful intentions. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Right speech. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) The Customs of the Noble Ones. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) A Question of Skill: An Interview with Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
(*) Listen well. Ajahn Fuang Jotiko (translated by Bhikkhu Thanissaro)
(*) It’s not about fatalism. Bhikkhu Thanissaro
(*) Putting the self aside. Bhikkhu Thanissaro.
(*) Generosity First. Bhikkhu Thanissaro.
(*) Admirable Friendship. Bhikkhu Thanissaro.

(*) Message for a Globalized World. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Living Message of the Dhammapada. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Questions on Kamma. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Questions on Rebirth. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Tolerance and Diversity. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Two Faces of the Dhamma. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Buddha & His Message - Past, Present, and Future. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Promoting Buddhism in Europe. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) The Case for Study. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) An Interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi. Bhikkhu Kantasilo
(*) Climbing to the Top of the Mountain. An interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi.
(*) The Jhānas and the Lay Disciple According to the Pāli Suttas. Bhikkhu Bodhi.
(*) Translator for the Buddha: An Interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi.

(*) Emptiness and Pure Awareness. Ajahn Amaro
(*) Beyond Being and Non-Being. Ajahn Amaro
(*) In the Refuge of Sangha. Ajahn Amaro
(*) Spiritual Friendship. Ajahn Amaro
(*) The Lesser, The Greater, The Diamond and The Way. Ajahn Amaro
(*) The Happy Monk: Ajahn Amaro on Living Buddhism in the West
(*) Rugged Interdependency: Generosity in the Land of the Individualist. Ajahn Amaro
(*) Gathering Together the Three Levels of Truth. Ajahn Amaro.
(*) Escaping from Mara. Ajahn Amaro.
(*) A day in the life: A monk on Fearless Mountain (Ajahn Amaro). Tony Anthony.

(*) The Four Parameters of Clinging. Ajahn Pasanno.
(*) An Extraordinary Yet Ordinary Human Being. Ajahn Pasanno.

(*) Growth and development of Buddhist Organizations. Bhante H. Gunaratana
(*) Going upstream. Bhante H. Gunaratana
(*) Sex, Celebacy and the Spiritual life. Bhante H. Gunaratana
(*) The Buddhist view of death - An interview with Bhante Gunaratana. Samaneri Sudhamma and Margot Born.
(*) Do it yourself. Bhante H. Gunaratana.

(*) The God-Idea. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Leading a Buddhist Life. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Buddhism in the eyes of intellectuals. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) A happy married life. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Is death really frightening? Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Problems and Responsibilities. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera
(*) Buddhism for the future. Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Mahathera

(*) Observing the problems in our lives. Ajahn Jagaro
(*) Skillful means to reduce the power of ill-will. Ajahn Jagaro
(*) Getting to know the mind. Ajahn Jagaro
(*) Nibbana and the Paradox of Happiness. Ajahn Jagaro
(*) A Conversation with John Cianciosi (formerly, Ajahn Jagaro).
(*) Death and Dying. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) Compassion - The Natural Expression of Awakening. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) Beyond Boredom and Depression. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) Anatta (Non-self) and Kamma (Karma): The Best Kept Secret in the Universe. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) Buddhism and God. Ajahn Jagaro.
(*) True Freedom. Ajahn Jagaro.

(*) Following the true Buddhist path
(*) The Prison of Life. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
(*) Nibbana for Everyone. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
(*) Forest Wat, Wild Monks. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
(*) Essential Points of Buddhist Teaching. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
(*) Emptiness. Bhikkhu Buddhadasa
(*) The Undying. Ajahn Maha Boowa

(*) On Making a Mistake. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Attachment. Ajahn Brahmavamvo
(*) The Meaning of Sangha. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) In the Presence of Nibbana - Developing Faith in the Buddhist Path to Enlightenment. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Growth of Buddhism in the West. Ajahn Brahmavamso
(*) Living Meaningfully, Dying Joyfully. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) Paticca-samuppada - Dependent Origination. Ajahn Brahamvamso.
(*) A Forest Monk and a Zen Roshi. Ajahn Brahmavamso & Gil Alon, interviewed by Rachael Kohn.
(*) There are gods, miracles do happen. Ajahn Brahmavamso.
(*) The Buddhist perspective. Ajahn Brahmavamso.

(*) Practical Buddhism: Taking responsibility for our lives. Ajahn Jayasaro
(*) Laying the Foundation for Social Action. Ajahn Pasanno
(*) Going Forth. Ajahn Viradhammo
(*) Regret and Well Being. Bhikkhu Munindo
(*) An Iridescence on the Water. Bhikkhu Dhammavitakkho
(*) Practical Buddhism: Taking responsibility for our lives. Ajahn Jayasaro

(*) Fulfillment and Liberation. Ajahn Viradhammo
(*) Bringing the Teachings Alive. Ajahn Viradhammo
(*) A Ripple in a Pond - An interview with Ajahn Sucitto
(*) Origins and Decline: An Essay in Buddhist Cosmology. Bhikkhu Punnadhammo
(*) The Spiritual Faculties. Ajahn Nyanadhammo
(*) Making the Dhamma Your Own. Ajahn Khamdee Pabhaso
(*) Who is the Buddha? Narada Mahathera
(*) Right Speech. Piyadassi Mahathera
(*) Practicing the Dhamma in Ordinary Life: Generosity. Bhikkhu Yogavacara Rahula
(*) Is Theravada Buddhism for Arahatship Only? Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) No inner core - Anatta. Sayadaw U Silananda
(*) A talk of Kamma, Rebirth and Suffering. Sayadaw U Silananda.  
(*) How to live a proper life. Takkasila Ashin Sumangala

(*) Buddhist Theory of Kamma. Venerable Narada Mahathera
(*) Alayavijnana - Store Consciousness. Venerable Dr. Walpola Rahula
(*) Buddhism in the Western World. Venerable Dr. Walpola Rahula
(*) One Vehicle for Peace. Ven. Dr. Walpola Rahula.
(*) Kathina Robe-Offering Ceremony: Historical and Spiritual Significance. Bhikkhu Dhammasami
(*) The Practice of Chanting in Buddhism. Bhikkhu Dhammasami
(*) Liberation - Relevance of Sutta-Vinaya. Bhikkhu Dhammavuddho
(*) Only we can help ourselves. Bhikkhu Dhammavuddho
(*) Living in the present. Venerable Visuddhaacaara
(*) Sunyata, Emptiness and Self-emptying, Kenosis. Venerable Rewata Dhamma  
(*) Buddhism and Economic Justice. Venerable Rewata Dhamma.  
(*) The Contribution of Buddhism to the World of Art and Architecture. Venerable Rewata Dhamma.
(*) The Garden of Liberation. Bhikkhu Santikaro
(*) Parents and Children - Transmitting the Buddhist Heritage Across Generations. Venerable Medagama. Vajiraganana Nayake Thera

(*) Sangha: The Ideal World Community. Bhikkhu Prayudh Payutto
(*) From Ceylonese to Sri Lankan Buddhism. Bhikkhu Prayudh Payutto
(*) Where women stand. Bhikkhu Prayudh Payutto (Phra Dhammapitaka)
(*) Aging and Dying. Bhikkhu Prayudh Payutto

(*) E-learning Buddhism on the Internet. Bhikkhu Pannyavaro
(*) Lumbini in the New Millennium: Youth in Buddhism. Bhikkhu Sugandha
(*) Eight excellent and wonderful things in the great ocean and the Sasana. Bhikkhu Seelananda
(*) How the Buddha died. Bhikkhu Mettanando
(*) The God idea. Bhikkhu Dhammapiyo
(*) The First Discourse of the Buddha. Sayadaw Adipati
(*) Theory of Karma. Venerable Sayadaw U Sobhana
(*) Samma Ditthi: Right View. Bhikkhu Seelawimala
(*) Footprints in the dust: Buddha’s travels in India. Bhikkhu S. Dhammika
(*) The Tsunami - A Buddhist View. Bhikkhu S. Dhammika.

(*) How the Buddha’s Enlightenment changed the world’s thinking. Ven. Medagama Vajiragnana
(*) Practicing Dhamma In Ordinary Life: Generosity. Bhikkhu Yogavacara Rahula
(*) The Theravada Attitude to Discipline. Bhikkhu Nyanarama
(*) No Escape for the Ego. An interview with Venerable Master Sheng-yen by Carter Phipps
(*) The Ascetic Sumedhā’ s Life, and the Ten Perfections. Bhikkhu Giac-Hanh Dhammadhara.
(*) Buddhism for the Next Century: Toward Renewing a Moral Thai Society. Phra Phaisan Visalo.

(*) Protection Through Satipatthana. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahahera.
(*) Buddhism and the God-Idea. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahahera.
(*) Why End Suffering?. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahahera.
(*) Seeing Things As They Are. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahahera.
(*) Kamma and Its Fruit. Venerable Nyanaponika Mahahera.
(*) Ven. Nyanaponika Maha Thera: A Bhikkhu with intellectually convinced vision of Dhamma. Rohan L. Jayetilleke.

(*) Dhamma Without Rebirth? Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Buddhism Without Beliefs: Review. Bhikkhu Bodhi
(*) Buddhism Without Beliefs critiqued. Bhikkhu Punnadhammo.

(*) Harmonious Living. Ayya Khema
(*) Liberation Here and Now. Ayya Khema
(*) Why come to a monastery? Sister Candasiri
(*) Love Unbounded. Sister Candasiri
(*) Renunciation: The Highest Happiness. Sister Siripanna
(*) It can be very simple. An interview with Ajahn Sundara.
(*) Simplicity. Sister Ajahn Sundara.
(*) Taking Refuge. Sister Ajahn Sundara.
(*) Freedom in Restraint. Sister Ajahn Sundara.
(*) Relinquishing ‘Me’ and ‘Mine’. Sister Ajahn Jitindriya.
(*) The Process Of Mental Suffering. Bhikkhuni Lieu-Phap.  
(*) The Approach Of Ancient Healing:  Psychotherapy In Buddhism. Bhikkhuni Khemanandi Huyen-Chau.
(*) Buddhist Attitude to Education. Bhikkhuni Dhammananda Nguyen-Huong.

(*) On growing a Theravadan Nuns’ Sangha in Britain
(*) The First Buddhist Nun. Rev. Sarika Dharma
(*) Restoring the Order of Nuns to the Theravaadin Tradition. Senarat Wijayasundara
(*) On the restoration of Bhikkhuni Order - Selected articles
(*) Interview with the Venerable Bhikkhuni Kusuma. Pennie White
(*) Buddhist women. Bimala Churn Law

(*) Prosperity and Happiness: The Buddhist View. Suvimalee Karunaratna
(*) The Talk Nobody Wants to Hear. Charlotte Joko Beck
(*) Buddhist Nuns in Burma. Dr. Friedgard Lottermoser
(*) Is Buddhism a Religion? Dorothy Figen
(*) Why Is There Suffering in the World? Dorothy Figen
(*) Facets of Metta. Sharon Salzberg
(*) Mudita. Eileen Siriwardhana
(*) Pride And Conceit. Dr. Elizabeth Ashby and Brian Fawcett
(*) Paramis: The Heart of Buddha’s Teaching and Our Own Practice. Sylvia Boorstein
(*) Sylvia Boorstein: Meditation and Spirituality. Catharine Reeve

(*) The Greatest Blessings. Nina van Gorkom
(*) Understanding Reality. Nina van Gorkom
(*) Morality with and without a creator God. Radhika Abeysekera
(*) The Appeal of Buddhism in the West. Radhika Abeysekera.
(*) Women’s Liberation. Sharon Salzberg, Barbara Rhodes, Judith Simmer-Brown & Pat O’Hara
(*) Woman to Woman. Sandy Boucher
(*) One Foot in the World - Buddhist Approaches to Present-day Problems. Lily De Silva
(*) Sanghamitta Theri - a liberated woman. Dr. Lorna Dewaraja

(*) When should we hold our tongue? Rasika Quek
(*) Living Buddhism. Venerable Chin Kung
(*) The Slightly Demented Vision of Robert Thurman. Prof. Robert Thurman
(*) Passing the Light. Tang Chade Meng
(*) The Perception of “Karma-Free” CyberZones. Richard P. Hayes
(*) Five Steps to Skillful Means in Buddhist Forums. Dominick Spirelli
(*) Ethnic Buddhists in Australia. Graeme Lyall
(*) The Purpose of Life. Graeme Lyall
(*) Radical Buddhism. Leonard Price
(*) Buddhism: A Method of Mind Training. Leonard A. Bullen
(*) Vedana (Sensation) in Paticcasamuppada (Dependent Origination). Vipassana Research Institute.

(*) Seeking the Buddha’s Footprints. Shantum Seth
(*) Buddhism and Thai Society. Sunthorn Plamintr
(*) The Buddhist Attitude to God. V. A. Gunasekara.
(*) Hinduism in Buddhist Perspective. V. A. Gunasekara
(*) Buddhist reflections on death. V.F. Gunaratna
(*) Homosexuality and Theravada Buddhism. A. L. De Silva
(*) Facing Death Without Fear. Lily De Silva.

(*) Vietnamese mode of self-reference: A model of Buddhist egology. Steven W. Laycock
(*) Born Again. Sanitsude Ekachai
(*) A Simple Forest Monk. Binh Anson
(*) How I became a practicing Buddhist. Binh Anson
(*) Why I Am a Buddhist. Anthony Billings
(*) Buddhism in the Kingdom of Thailand. Sathien Bodhinantha

(*) Leading Virtuous Lives As Laymen. U Chit Tin
(*) Global problem-solving: A Buddhist perspective. Sulak Sivaraksa
(*) Buddhism and Tolerance for diversity of religion and belief. Sulak Sivaraksa
(*) A Thai perspective on socially engaged Buddhism: A conversation with Sulak Sivaraksa. Donald Rothberg
(*) American Buddhists: who are they? Jan Nattier
(*) The worldliness of Buddhism. Donald K. Swearer
(*) What appeals to me most in Buddhism. Francis Story
(*) Interpretation of Buddhist terminology at the background of Chinese traditional thoughts. Latika Lahiri
(*) The significance of ‘Tathagatagarbha’ —   A positive expression of ‘Sunyata’. Heng-Ching Shih
(*) Cosmology and meditation: from the Agganna Sutta to the Mahayana Buddhism. Rupert Gethin

(*) The mind-body relationship in Pali Buddhism: A philosophical investigation. Peter Harvey
(*) The Buddhist path and social responsibility. Jack Kornfield
(*) To the forest for refuge. An interview with Joseph Goldstein
(*) Why is Buddhism the fastest growing religion in Australia? Darren Nelson
(*) The Dhamma Theory - Philosophical Cornerstone of the Abhidhamma. Y. Karunadasa
(*) How Free is Freedom of Thought. Sanath Nanayakkara
(*) Buddhist Ethics, Moral Perfection and Modern Society. Prof. P.D. Premasiri
(*) Freedom of faith and worship in Myanmar. Hla Myo Nwe  
(*) The Bodhisattva concept.  A. G. S. Kariyawasam
(*) The Road to Liberation - Paticcasamuppada (Dependent Origination). Ron Wijewantha

(*) The six Buddhist universities of ancient India. D. Amarasiri Weeraratne
(*) Thailand’s gift to Sri Lanka: the establishment of the Siam Nikaya. Dr. Lorna Dewaraja
(*) Buddhist missionary in the West after WW II. Nemsiri Mutukumara
(*) The Prospects for the Growth of Buddhism in Germany and other Western Countries. Agganyani (Christa Bentenrieder).
(*) The legend of Bundala: Venerable Nanavira Thera (1920-1965). Kingsley Heendeniya.
(*) On Understanding Nama-Rupa. Kingsley Heendeniya.
(*) The Buddhist Critique of Sassatavada and Ucchedavada: The Key to a proper Understanding of the Origin and the Doctrines of early Buddhism. Y. Karunadasa.  
(*) Establishing Pali Text Society for Buddhist literature. Nemsiri Mutukumara.  
(*) The Great Sariputta, the foremost disciple of Gautama Samma-Sambuddha. W. D. Wickramasinghe.

(*) The Importance of Study. A Panel Discussion with Bhante Henepola Gunaratana, John Daido Loori, Christina Feldman and Georges Dreyfus.
(*) Venerable Narada Maha Thera: A Buddhist Missionary Par Excellence. O. Gunasekera.
(*) The Indispensability of Peace in the Present World Context. Bhikkhu Sugandha.
(*) The Life and Teachings of Ajahn Chah: Remembrances of His Western Students.
(*) Chanting the “Mirror of the Dhamma”. Ajahn Punnadhammo.
(*) In the footsteps of the ‘Slave Of Buddha’ (Bhikkhu Buddhadasa). Karnjariya Sukrung.
(*) The food of kindness. Ayya Medhanandi.
(*) The way of the mystic. Ayya Medhanandi.
(*) The joy hidden in sorrow. Ayya Medhanandi.
(*) Generosity and goodness at every step. Ayya Medhanandi.
(*) Come from the shadows. Ayya Medhanandi.

(*) Sri Lanka’s Contribution to the Development of the Pali Canon. Prof. Oliver Abeynayake.
(*) Buddhism in Sri Lanka. G. P. Malalasekera.
(*) Soulful wit - Towards a more joyous New Year. Nissara Horayangura.
(*) Ideal Solitude: An Exposition on the Bhaddekaratta Sutta. Bhikkhu Ñanananda.
(*) The great virtue: Sugato. Chandani Abeynayake.
(*) Note on the probable age of the Dialogues (Digha and Majjhima Nikàyas). T. W. Rhys Davids.
(*) Crossing the wilderness: how the Buddha narrates his own travels. Sarah Shaw.
(*) Buddhism and Sex. M. O’C. Walshe.
(*) Recollections of an Anagarika. Adrian Cambden.
(*) Buddhism and the Brahma concept. Bellanwila Wimalaratana Thera.

(*) Conceit and Pride. Elizabeth Ashby and Brian Fawcett.

5. Other Information:

(*) The Buddhist Society of Western Australia, Bodhinyana Monastery and Dhammasara Nuns’s Monastery
(*) Sasanarakkha Buddhist Sanctuary . A Buddhist sanctuary located in Malaysia for the training of Theravada Buddhist monks in theory and practice of the Dhammavinaya. Dedicated to evolving a modern Theravada Buddhist identity guided by the scriptural tradition.

For comments, questions and other requests, please send email to Binh Anson, Ph.D.:
budsas@gmail.com

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Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)
These, bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry.
Which four?
Association with good men, hearing the correct Dhamma,
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https://goodmenproject.com/learning/the-buddha-the-spiritual-journey-that-became-a-religion/

The Buddha: The Spiritual Journey that Became a Religion



Twenty-five hundred years ago one’s man’s spiritual journey was the
beginning of one of the world’s seven religions — boasting 376 million
followers today. He is simply called “The Buddha,” and he grew up the
son of a king…sheltered from the realities of human suffering. When he
finally learned the harsh truth, he left his family and set off on a
path to understand life itself — first as a monk and then as a teacher.


Transcript Provided by YouTube:

 

00:00
Twenty-five thousand years ago one’s man’s spiritual journey was the beginning of one
00:05
of the world’s seven religions — boasting 376 million followers today.
00:10
He is simply called “The Buddha,” and he grew up the son of a king…sheltered from
00:14
the realities of human suffering.
00:16
When he finally learned the harsh truth, he left his family and set off on a path to understand
00:22
life itself — first as a monk and then as a teacher.
00:25
Let’s take a closer look at “The Buddha”, Siddhartha Gautama on Biographics.
00:32
Early Life
00:33
The
00:45
founder of Buddhism was a man named Siddhartha Gautama.
00:48
He was the son a chieftain and believed to be born in Lumbini (modern-day Nepal) in the
00:52
6th century B.C.
00:54
His father Śuddhodana (translating to, “he who grows pure rice”) presided over a large
00:58
clan called the Shakya in either a republic or an oligarchy system of rule.
01:03
His mother was Queen Māyā of Sakya who is said to have died shortly after his birth.
01:07
The infant was given the name Siddhartha, meaning “he who achieves his aim.”
01:12
When Siddhartha was still a baby, several seers with the power of supernatural insight
01:17
into the future, predicted he would either be a great spiritual leader, military leader
01:22
or a king.
01:23
Since Siddhartha’s mother died, he was brought up by his maternal aunt, Maha Pajapati.
01:29
His father, hoping to steer Siddhartha in the direction of the throne, shielded him
01:32
from religion of any kind and sheltered him from seeing human hardship and suffering.
01:38
As such, he was raised in the lap of luxury and blissful ignorance where he knew nothing
01:42
about aging, disease, or death.
01:45
At the age of 16, Siddhartha’s father arranged his marriage to a cousin, Yaśodharā, who
01:49
was also a teenager.
01:51
She gave birth to a son, Rāhula, some years later.
01:53
Siddhartha is said to have remained living in the palace until the age of 29 when everything
01:59
changed.
02:00
According to the story, one day Siddhartha travelled outside of the palace gates and
02:04
he was deeply disturbed by the sight of an old man.
02:07
His charioteer Channa explained to Siddhartha that all people grow old and that death is
02:12
an integral part of life.
02:14
This prompted Siddhartha to secretly venture outside the palace on more trips.
02:19
When leaving, it was said that, “the horse’s hooves were muffled by the gods” so as to
02:24
prevent the guards from knowing of his departure.
02:27
Outside the gates on these trips he encountered a sick man, a decaying corpse, and a homeless,
02:32
holy man (also known as an ascetic).
02:34
Channa told Siddhartha ascetics give up their material possessions and forgo physical pleasures
02:39
for a higher, spiritual purpose.
02:42
After witnessing the reality of human hardship and suffering, Siddhartha had no interest
02:47
in living at the palace.
02:48
He left his wife and child to discover the true meaning of life, first through living
02:53
as a traveling beggar, like the ascetics he saw on the streets.
02:56
Ascetic life “The root of suffering is attachment.”
03:06
Siddhartha first went to the city of Rajagaha and began begging on the streets to survive.
03:13
He was recognized there by the king’s men and offered the throne.
03:16
He rejected it but promised to come back and visit once he attained enlightenment.
03:20
When he left Rajagaha, he met a hermit Brahmin saint named Alara Kalama.
03:26
Kalama taught Siddhartha a form of meditation known as the dhyānic state, or the “sphere
03:30
of nothingness.”
03:31
Siddhartha eventually became his teacher’s equal and Kalama offered him his place saying,
03:36
“You are the same as I am now.
03:38
There is no difference between us.
03:40
Stay here and take my place and teach my students with me.”
03:43
But Siddhartha didn’t stay, and instead he moved on to another teacher, Udaka Ramaputta.
03:49
Once again, he achieved high levels of meditative consciousness and was asked to succeed his
03:54
teacher.
03:55
Siddhartha refused the offer and moved on.
03:58
Through the practice of meditation, Siddhartha realized dhyana, a “state of perfect equanimity
04:02
and awareness” was the path to enlightenment.
04:05
He also realized that living life as an extremely deprived beggar, as he had done, wasn’t
04:10
working.
04:11
It had been six years, and he had eaten very little and fasted until he was weak.
04:20
Awakening
04:26
After starving himself for days, Siddhartha famously accepted milk and rice pudding from
04:30
a village girl named Sujata.
04:32
He was so emaciated, she thought he was a spirit there to grant her a wish.
04:37
Siddhartha, after having this meal, decided against living a life of extreme self-denial
04:41
since his spiritual goals were not being met.
04:44
He instead opted to follow a path of balance, known in Buddhism as the Middle Way.
04:49
At this turning point, his five followers believed he was giving up and abandoned him.
04:54
Soon after he started meditating under a fig tree (now called the Bodhi tree) and committed
04:56
himself to staying there until he had found enlightenment.
04:59
He meditated for six days and nights and reached enlightenment on the full moon morning of
05:04
May, a week before he turned thirty-five.
05:06
At the time of his enlightenment he gained complete insight into the cause of suffering,
05:11
and the steps necessary to eliminate it.
05:14
He called these steps the “Four Noble Truths.”
05:17
After his awakening, the Buddha met two merchant brothers from the city of Balkh in modern-day
05:22
Afghanistan.
05:23
The brothers, Trapusa and Bahalika, offered the Buddha his first meal after enlightenment
05:28
and they became his first lay disciplines.
05:30
According to some texts, each brother gave a hair from his head and these became relics
05:32
enshrined at the Shwe Dagon Temple in Rangoon, Burma.
05:33
The Teacher
05:34
“I teach because you and all beings want to have happiness and want to avoid suffering.
05:42
I teach the way things are.”
05:52
Legend has it that initially Buddha was reluctant to spread his knowledge to others as he was
05:57
doubtful of whether the common people would understand his teachings.
06:01
But then the king of gods, Brahma, convinced Buddha to teach, and he set out to do that.
06:07
The Buddha travelled to Deer Park in northern India, where he set in motion what Buddhists
06:11
call the Wheel of Dharma by delivering his first sermon to the five companions who had
06:16
abandoned him earlier.
06:17
Together with him, they formed the first Buddhist monks, also known as saṅgha.
06:21
All five attained nirvana, a state along the path to enlightenment yet not full enlightenment.
06:27
They were known as arahants, meaning “one who is worthy,” or “perfected person.”
06:30
From the first five, the group of arahants steadily grew to 60 within the first few months
06:34
and eventually, the sangha reached more than one thousand.
06:38
The sangha traveled through the subcontinent, expounding the dharma.
06:41
This continued throughout the year, except during the four months of the Vassa rainy
06:45
season when ascetics of all religions rarely traveled.
06:49
One reason was that it was more difficult to do so without causing harm to animal life.
06:53
At this time of year, the sangha would retreat to monasteries, public parks or forests, where
06:57
people would come to them.
06:59
The first vassana was spent at Varanasi when the sangha was formed.
07:02
After this, the Buddha kept a promise to travel to Rajagaha, capital of Magadha, to visit
07:06
King Bimbisara.
07:07
During this visit, Sariputta and Maudgalyayana were converted by Assaji, one of the first
07:12
five disciples, after which they were to become the Buddha’s two foremost followers.
07:17
The Buddha spent the next three seasons at Veluvana Bamboo Grove monastery in Rajagaha,
07:23
the capital of Magadha.
07:24
Upon hearing of his son’s awakening, Suddhodana sent, over a period, ten delegations to ask
07:29
him to return to Kapilavastu.
07:30
On the first nine occasions, the delegates failed to deliver the message and instead
07:34
joined the sangha to become arahants.
07:36
The tenth delegation, led by Kaludayi, a childhood friend of Gautama’s (who also became an arahant),
07:42
however, delivered the message.
07:43
Now two years after his awakening, the Buddha agreed to return, and made a two-month journey
07:47
by foot to Kapilavastu, teaching the dharma as he went.
07:51
At his return, the royal palace prepared a midday meal, but the sangha was making an
07:55
alms round in Kapilavastu.
07:58
Hearing this, Suddhodana approached his son, the Buddha, saying: “Ours is the warrior
08:01
lineage of Mahamassata, and not a single warrior has gone seeking alms.”
08:06
The Buddha is said to have replied: “That is not the custom of your royal lineage.
08:09
But it is the custom of my Buddha lineage.
08:12
Several thousands of Buddhas have gone by seeking alms.”
08:16
Buddhist texts say that Suddhodana invited the sangha into the palace for the meal, followed
08:20
by a dharma talk.
08:22
After this he is said to have become a sotapanna.
08:25
During the visit, many members of the royal family joined the sangha.
08:28
The Buddha’s cousins Ananda and Anuruddha became two of his five chief disciples.
08:33
At the age of seven, his son Rahula also joined, and became one of his ten chief disciples.
08:38
His half-brother Nanda also joined and became an arahant.
08:41
His wife, reportedly became a nun.
08:43
Throughout his life, Buddha encouraged his students to question his teachings and confirm
08:47
them through their own experience.
08:49
This non-dogmatic attitude still characterizes Buddhism today.
08:52
Buddhism “You yourself must strive.
08:53
The Buddhas only point the way.”
09:07
Buddhism is the fourth largest religion in the world and t is also one of the oldest,
09:11
established in the 6th century B.C. in present-day Nepal, India.
09:14
Unlike other religions, Buddhists do not worship a God.
09:17
Instead, they focus on spiritual development with the end-goal of becoming “enlightened”
09:22
— though not in the intellectual sense of the word.
09:24
In the Western world, enlightenment is most often associated with the 18th century European
09:29
Enlightenment Period, a movement characterized by a rational and scientific approach to politics,
09:35
religion, and social and economic issues.
09:37
In Buddhism, the simplest explanation of attaining enlightenment is when an individual finds
09:42
out the truth about life, and experiences “an awakening” where they are freed from
09:46
the cycle of being reborn.
09:48
Central to Buddhism is the notion that to live is to suffer, and everything is in a
09:52
constant state of change.
09:54
All Buddhists believe, unless one has become enlightened, they will be reincarnated again
09:59
and again.
10:00
Enlightenment can be achieved through the practice and development of morality, meditation
10:01
and wisdom.
10:02
Four Noble Truths The Four Noble Truths contain the essence
10:03
of the Buddha’s teachings.
10:04
It was these four principles that the Buddha came to understand during his meditation under
10:05
the bodhi tree.
10:06
These are: The truth of suffering (Dukkha); the truth of the origin of suffering (Samudāya);
10:10
the truth of the cessation of suffering (Nirodha); and the truth of the path to the cessation
10:15
of suffering (Magga).
10:17
Suffering comes in many forms.
10:18
Three obvious kinds of suffering correspond to the first three sights the Buddha saw on
10:23
his first journey outside his palace: old age, sickness and death.
10:27
But according to the Buddha, the problem of suffering goes much deeper.
10:30
Life is not ideal: it frequently fails to live up to our expectations.
10:34
Human beings are subject to desires and cravings, but even when we are able to satisfy these
10:40
desires, the satisfaction is only temporary.
10:43
Pleasure does not last; or if it does, it becomes monotonous.
10:46
Even when we are not suffering from outward causes like illness or bereavement, we are
10:50
unfulfilled, unsatisfied.
10:53
This is the truth of suffering.
10:55
The next noble truth is the origin of suffering.
10:57
Our day-to-day troubles may seem to have easily identifiable causes: thirst, pain from an
11:03
injury, sadness from the loss of a loved one.
11:04
In the second of his Noble Truths, though, the Buddha claimed to have found the cause
11:08
of all suffering – and it is much more deeply rooted than our immediate worries.
11:13
The Buddha taught that the root of all suffering is desire, tanhā.
11:16
This comes in three forms, which he described as the Three Roots of Evil, or the Three Fires,
11:21
or the Three Poisons.
11:23
The three roots of evil are greed and desire, represented in art by a rooster; ignorance
11:27
or delusion, represented by a pig, and hatred and destructive urges, represented by a snake.
11:33
He taught more about suffering in his Fire Sermon, saying,a
11:34
that is burning?
11:35
The eye is burning, forms are burning, eye-consciousness is burning, eye-contact is burning, also whatever
11:36
is felt as pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant that arises with eye-contact for its indispensable
11:37
condition, that too is burning.
11:38
Burning with what?
11:39
Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion.
11:40
I say it is burning with birth, aging and death, with sorrows, with lamentations, with
11:41
pains, with griefs, with despairs.
11:42
The Third Noble Truth is Cessation of suffering (Nirodha).
11:43
The Buddha taught that the way to extinguish desire, which causes suffering, is to liberate
11:44
oneself from attachment.
11:45
This is the third Noble Truth – the possibility of liberation.
11:47
The Buddha was a living example that this is possible in a human lifetime.
11:51
“Estrangement” here means disenchantment: a Buddhist aims to know sense conditions clearly
11:55
as they are without becoming enchanted or misled by them.
11:58
Nirvana means extinguishing.
12:00
Attaining nirvana – reaching enlightenment – means extinguishing the three fires of greed,
12:05
delusion and hatred.
12:07
Someone who reaches nirvana does not immediately disappear to a heavenly realm.
12:12
Nirvana is better understood as a state of mind that humans can reach.
12:16
It is a state of profound spiritual joy, without negative emotions and fears.
12:20
Someone who has attained enlightenment is filled with compassion for all living things.After
12:25
death an enlightened person is liberated from the cycle of rebirth, but Buddhism gives no
12:29
definite answers as to what happens next.
12:32
The Buddha discouraged his followers from asking too many questions about nirvana.
12:36
He wanted them to concentrate on the task at hand, which was freeing themselves from
12:40
the cycle of suffering.
12:42
Asking questions is like quibbling with the doctor who is trying to save your life.
12:46
The Fourth Noble Truth is the path to the cessation of suffering (Magga).
12:51
The final Noble Truth is the Buddha’s prescription for the end of suffering.
12:55
This is a set of principles called the Eightfold Path.
12:58
The Eightfold Path is also called the Middle Way: it avoids both indulgence and severe
13:03
asceticism, neither of which the Buddha had found helpful in his search for enlightenment.
13:08
The eight stages are not to be taken in order, but rather support and reinforce each other.
13:12
Death and Legacy
13:13
“I can die happily.
13:14
I have not kept a single teaching hidden in a closed hand.
13:15
Everything that is useful for you, I have already given.
13:16
Be your own guiding light.”
13:17
According to the Mahaparinibbana Sutta of the Pali canon, at the age of 80, the Buddha
13:34
announced that he would soon reach Parinirvana, or the final deathless state, and abandon
13:39
his earthly body.
13:40
After this, the Buddha ate his last meal, which he had received as an offering from
13:44
a blacksmith named Cunda.
13:46
Falling violently ill, Buddha instructed his attendant Ānanda to convince Cunda that the
13:50
meal eaten at his place had nothing to do with his passing and that his meal would be
13:55
a source of the greatest merit as it provided the last meal for a Buddha.
13:59
Mettanando and von Hinüber argue that the Buddha died of old age, rather than food poisoning.
14:00
The Buddha’s teachings began to be codified shortly after his death, and continue to be
14:04
followed one way or another (and with major discrepancies) by at least 400 million people
14:09
to this day.
14:10
There are numerous different schools or sects of Buddhism.
14:12
The two largest are Theravada Buddhism, which is most popular in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Thailand,
14:17
Laos and Burma (Myanmar), and Mahayana Buddhism, which is strongest in Tibet, China, Taiwan,
14:22
Japan, Korea, and Mongolia.
14:23
The majority of Buddhist sects do not seek to proselytise (preach and convert), with
14:27
the notable exception of Nichiren Buddhism.
14:28
All schools of Buddhism seek to aid followers on a path of awakenment with awareness.
14:30
“If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts, happiness follows them like a never-departing
14:36
shadow.”


Friends

Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)
These,
bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry.
Which four?

Association with good men,
hearing the correct Dhamma,
appropriate
reflection
and
practice in accordance with the Dhamma.

These, bhikkhus,
are the four factors for stream-entry.
180410 Factors for Stream Entry \ \ Thanissaro Bhikkhu \ \ Dhamma Talk
Dhamma Talks by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
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Evening Dhamma talk by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (in English).
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2018, Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu. This work is licensed under the Creative
Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy
of this license, visit
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Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)
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180410 Factors for Stream Entry \ \ Thanissaro Bhikkhu \ \ Dhamma Talk
Evening
Dhamma talk by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (in English). Copyright 2018,
Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons
Attribution-NonC…

Friends


These, bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry.
Which four?
Association with good men,
hearing the correct Dhamma,
appropriate reflection
and
practice in accordance with the Dhamma.
These, bhikkhus, are the four factors for stream-entry.
Ajahn Amaro - The Breakthrough(Stream Entry)
1983dukkha
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Ajahn
Amaro (born 1956) is a Theravadin teacher, and abbot of the Amaravati
Buddhist Monastery at the eastern end of the Chiltern Hills in south
east England. The centre, in practice as much for ordinary people as for
monastics, is inspired by the Thai forest tradition and the teachings
of the late Ajahn Chah. Its chief priorities are the practice and
teaching of Buddhist ethics, together with traditional concentration and
insight meditation techniques, as an effective way of dissolving
stress.
Ajahn Amaro was
born Jeremy Charles Julian Horner in Kent. He was educated at Sutton
Valence School and Bedford College, University of London. Ajahn means
teacher. He is a second cousin of I.B. Horner (1896-1981), late
President of the Pali Text Society.
Apart
from a certain interest in the theories of Rudolf Steiner—to which he
had been introduced by Trevor Ravenscroft,Amaro’s principal enthusiasms
on leaving university were, by his own admission, pretty much those
standard-issue among sceptical students of the day: sex, drugs and
rock’n'roll.
Having
completed his honours degree in psychology and physiology, in 1977 he
went to Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand on an undefined “open-ended”
spiritual search. He somehow found himself in northeast Thailand, at the
forest monastery of Wat Pah Nanachat. Ajahn Chah’s charismatic impact
and the encouragement of the senior American monk Ajahn Pabhakaro were
decisive. It changed his life. Having become a lay renunciate, four
months later he became a novice and in 1979 he received upasampada from
Ajahn Chah and took profession as a Theravadin bhikkhu. He stayed in
Thailand for two years. Amaro then went back to England to help Ajahn
Sumedho establish Chithurst Monastery in West Sussex. With the blessing
of his abbot, in 1983 he moved to Harnham Vihara in Northumberland. He
made the entire 830-mile journey on foot, chronicled in his 1984 volume
Tudong: The Long Road North.
In
the early 1990s Amaro made several teaching trips to northern
California. Many who attended his meditation retreats became
enthusiastic about the possibility of establishing a permanent monastic
community in the area.
Amaravati,
his mother house back in England, meanwhile received a substantial
donation of land in Mendocino County from Chan Master Hsuan Hua, founder
of the City of Ten Thousand Buddhas in Talmage. The land was allocated
to establish a forest retreat. Since for some years Ajahn Sumedho had
venerated the Chinese master, both abbots hoped that, among its other
virtues, the center would serve as a symbolic bond between the otherwise
distinct Theravada and Mahayana lineages.
Care
for what became Abhayagiri was placed in the hands of a group of lay
practitioners, the Sanghapala Foundation.[2] Ajahn Pasanno was appointed
founding co-abbot of Abhayagiri with Ajahn Amaro. The latter announced
on 8 February 2010 that he would be leaving Abhayagiri and returning to
England, having accepted a request from Ajahn Sumedho to succeed him as
abbot at Amaravati.
Dhamma Talk

No abiding - 404 » Amaravati Buddhist Monastery

There
was no page to abide on The page you were linked to does not seems to
exist (yet?). Perhaps this has been cleaned up! If you think this link
… Read More
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Ajahn Amaro - The Breakthrough(Stream Entry)
Ajahn Amaro - The Breakthrough(Stream Entry)
http://www.amaravati.org/teachings/audio_compilation/2083
Ajahn Amaro (born 1956) is a Theravadin teacher, and abbot of the
Amaravati Buddhist Monastery at t…
youtube.com


27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,

Opdagelse af Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

fire faktorer for stream-entry

Disse, bhikkhus, er de fire faktorer for stream-entry. Hvilke fire? Forening med gode mænd, hørelse af den rigtige Dhamma, passende refleksion og øvelse i overensstemmelse med Dhamma. Disse, bhikkhus, er de fire faktorer for stream-entry.

28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,

Ontdekking van Awakened One met Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

vier factoren voor stream-entry

Dit, monniken, zijn de vier factoren voor het binnenkomen van stromen. Welke vier? Omgang met goede mannen, de juiste Dhamma horen, gepaste reflectie en oefening in overeenstemming met de Dhamma. Dit, monniken, zijn de vier factoren voor het binnenkomen van stromen.


30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

Malkovro de Vekita Kun Konscia Universo (DAOAU)

kvar faktoroj por fluo-eniro

Ĉi tiuj, monetoj, estas la kvar faktoroj por fluo-eniro. Kiuj kvar? Asocio kun bonaj viroj, aŭdante la ĝustan Dhamma, taŭgan pripensadon kaj praktikon laŭ la Dhamma. Ĉi tiuj, monetoj, estas la kvar faktoroj por fluo-eniro.

31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,

Teadvuse universumiga äratatud avastamine (DAOAU)

neli tegurit voogesituse jaoks

Need, bhikkhus, on voolu sisenemise neli tegurit. Millised neli? Seltskond heade meestega, õige Dhamma kuulmine, asjakohane järelemõtlemine ja harjutamine vastavalt Dhammale. Need, bhikkhus, on voolu sisenemise neli tegurit.

32) Classical Filipino klassikaline filipiinlane,

Pagtuklas ng Awakened One with Awciousness Universe (DAOAU)

apat na mga kadahilanan para sa stream-entry

Ang mga ito, mga bhikkhus, ang apat na mga kadahilanan para sa stream-entry. Alin ang apat? Pakikipag-ugnay sa mabubuting lalaki, naririnig ang tamang Dhamma, naaangkop na pagsasalamin at kasanayan alinsunod sa Dhamma. Ang mga ito, mga bhikkhus, ang apat na mga kadahilanan para sa stream-entry.

33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

Herätyn löytäminen tietoisuusuniversumilla (DAOAU)

neljä tekijää virran tuloon

Nämä, bhikkhus, ovat neljä tekijää virtauksen aloittamiseen. Mikä neljä? Yhdistyminen hyvien miesten kanssa, oikean Dhamman kuuleminen, asianmukainen pohdinta ja käytäntö Dhamman mukaisesti. Nämä, bhikkhus, ovat neljä tekijää virtauksen aloittamiseen.

https://goodmenproject.com/culture/voltaire-and-the-buddha/

34) Classical French- Français classique,

Découverte de l’Éveillé avec l’Univers de la Conscience (DAOAU)

quatre facteurs pour l’entrée dans le courant

Ce
sont là, les bhikkhus, les quatre facteurs d’entrée dans les cours
d’eau. Quels quatre? Association avec des hommes bons, entendre le
Dhamma correct, réflexion appropriée et pratique en accord avec le
Dhamma. Ce sont là, les bhikkhus, les quatre facteurs d’entrée dans les
cours d’eau.

Voltaire
and the Buddha Donald S. Lopez, Jr. looks at Voltaire’s early
reflections on Buddhism and how, in his desire to separate the Buddha’s
teachings from the trappings of religion, the French Awakenment with
Awareness thinker prefigured an approach now familiar in the West.



This article, Voltaire and the Buddha was originally published in The Public Domain Review under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. If you wish to reuse it please see: https://publicdomainreview.org/legal/

buddha statue thailand
Bronze statue depicting the “Ayuthia Crowned Buddha”, ca. 16th century, featured in The Antiques of Siam (1909) by J. W. Margrett — Source.

Bronze statue depicting the “Ayuthia Crowned Buddha”, ca. 16th century, featured in The Antiques of Siam (1909) by J. W. Margrett — Source.


After Ignatius Loyola formed the Society of Jesus in 1539, he
required that his missionaries send back detailed letters describing
their activities and the peoples and places they encountered. In France,
over the course of the eighteenth century, these were gathered together
and published as Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, thirty-four volumes
of which appeared between 1702 and 1776. The Jesuit accounts of
far-flung lands were widely read during the Enlightenment, serving, for
example, as important sources for Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond
d’Alembert’s seminal Encyclopédie. The contents of the letters were
various, but the Jesuits’ mission being what it was, it is perhaps not
surprising that religion figured prominently, with many accounts of what
would one day be called Buddhism.


Well into the nineteenth century, Europeans divided the population of
the world into four nations, based on their religion: Christians, Jews,
Muslims (often called Mahometans), and Idolaters. For centuries,
Buddhists fell into this last category. The process of their elevation
to having an “ism” of their own is too long to tell here. However, one
chapter in that story would be about those Jesuits, the intrepid
travelers who set out from Europe to spread the Gospel across Asia. St
Francis Xavier arrived in Japan in 1549, first imagining a kinship with
Buddhists; later he would condemn them. In China, Matteo Ricci first
dressed as a Buddhist monk before adopting the guise of a Confucian
scholar, writing works in Chinese condemning the “religion of Fo” (fo is
the Chinese word for Buddha). Early reports on the Buddhism of Thailand
came from delegations sent to the court of Siam by Louis XIV,
delegations that included Jesuit priests.


matteo ricci china jesuit mission

Frontispiece to Athanasius Kircher’s China Illustrata (1667),
depicting Jesuit missionaries Johann Adam Schall von Bell (left) and
Matteo Ricci (right), and in the upper part Society of Jesus founders
Francis Xavier (left) and Ignatius of Loyola (right) — Source.

The term “Buddhism” would not appear in English until the early
nineteenth century. The Jesuits who wrote the reports and the scholars
who read them did not recognize that the religions they encountered in
China, Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand were somehow the same. Each had its
own indigenous term for “Buddha” and each had its own artistic
conventions for representing him. His portrayal as an idol and as a
purveyor of idolatry did not change substantially over the course of the
eighteenth century but much more information about him and his
teachings began to accumulate.



The Encyclopédie of Diderot and d’Alembert was certainly the most famous
of the compendia of knowledge of the Enlightenment, but it was not the
only one. Inspired by it, in 1764 Voltaire published his own, which he
called Dictionnaire philosophique. Like so many of his works, it was
hailed by some and condemned by others. In it, he criticized the Roman
Catholic Church and offered negative portrayals of Judaism and Islam. He
also criticized Buddhism (although he did not use the term), but he
praised the Buddha, seeking, as others would do in the centuries that
followed, to separate the teacher from what would be represented as his
teachings. Indeed, he devoted an entry in his dictionary to the Buddha,
referring to him by the French rendering of one of his Thai epithets,
Sammonocodom, that is, the śramaṇa (mendicant) Gautama.


voltaire

Sketches of Voltaire aged 81, by Baron Dominique Vivant Denon, 1775 – Source.

He begins, “I recall that Sammonocodom, the god of the Siamese, was
born from a young virgin and was raised on a flower.” He goes on to
list, not without irony, other famous cases of miraculous birth from
other cultures. Immediately seeking to separate the man from the myth,
he observes that, “The religion of the Siamese proves to us that never
did a lawmaker teach bad morals,” noting that the rules that the Buddha
made for his monks are just as severe as those of St. Benedict. Voltaire
goes on to provide a somewhat idiosyncratic but not inaccurate list of
these rules. It includes, “Avoid songs, dances, assemblies, everything
that might soften the soul,” “Do not have gold or silver,” “Speak only
of justice and work only for justice,” “Sleep little, eat little, keep
only one robe,” Never mock,” and “Meditate in private, and reflect often
on the fragility of human affairs.”


This leads him to lament that in all religions “such a holy and
necessary morality” has been sullied by all manner of ridiculous and
risible stories. “Why is there not a single religion whose precepts do
not come from a sage and whose dogmas are not of a madman?” He lays the
blame for this at the feet of the disciples, who fear that their founder
will not be respected if he is not somehow divine. The consequences of
this deception, however, are dire. Reasonable people are attracted to
the precepts of the founder but are repelled by the doctrines invented
by the disciples. As a result, they inevitably come to reject the
original precepts. “So they shake the yoke, since it had been put on
badly; they no longer believe in God, because they see well that
Sammonocodom is not god.”


In the latter half of the entry on the Buddha, Voltaire demonstrates
that he has read the reports of the French Jesuits closely. He enters
into a discussion of a relatively arcane story in the life of the
Buddha, reported by several members of the French delegation to
Thailand, including the Jesuit Guy Tachard (1651-1712).


siam elephant

Image of Siam’s King Narai on his elephant, featured in the original French edition of Guy Tachard’s account of his travels, Voyage de Siam des pères Jesuites, envoyés par le roy, aux Indes & à la Chinesiam (1687) — Source.


In traditional accounts of the life of the Buddha, he has an evil
cousin named Devadatta. When the Buddha grows old, Devadatta, himself a
monk, urges the Buddha to retire and turn leadership of the order of
monks over to him. When the Buddha refuses, Devadatta tries to
assassinate him on three different occasions. The weight of these sins
is so great that he is swallowed by the earth, descending to the most
horrific of the several Buddhist hells, where he is impaled on three
iron spikes, one from his head to his feet, one through his chest, and
one through his shoulders. When Buddhist monks at the Siamese court saw
the crucifixes around the necks of the French Jesuits, they assumed that
it was Devadatta, that the foreign priests worshipped the Buddha’s
nemesis. Several members of the French delegation reported that this
dashed any hopes of conversion. When they tried to explain that this was
not Devadatta but God, the Buddhist monks doubted that someone as
powerful as God could succumb to such a punishment.


Voltaire reports all of this, describing Devadatta (whom he calls
Thevatat) as “a badly behaved rascal,” although he mistakes the sequence
of events, imagining the Devadatta was crucified on earth and then went
to hell. What is noteworthy, however, is that rather than seeing the
great irony in the Jesuits’ despair, as this famous apparent atheist
might be expected to do, he comes to their defense, noting that Jesus,
the true God, had given Pontius Pilate the power to crucify him. Thus,
if God can be crucified, his brother certainly can; Voltaire notes that
St. Jacques, the brother of Jesus, was stoned. In the case of Devadatta,
he could have been hanged rather than crucified, and his punishment may
have been unjust. If he was executed for a crime he did not commit, he
might have gone to heaven rather than hell. Voltaire concludes, “All of
this is extremely delicate.”


Devadatta

Mural at the Thai temple Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep depicting Devadatta as
he begins to be swallowed by the earth on his way down to hell, date
unknown but presumed ca. 19th century — Source.

Voltaire’s assent here to the theology of the crucifixion would seem at
odds with his often rude remarks about Christianity. However, what is
perhaps of greater interest is Voltaire’s prescience in his comments
about the Buddha. It would not be until well into the nineteenth century
that European scholars, all sons of the Enlightenment, sought to turn
the founders of religions from gods into men, to separate their precepts
from church doctrine. For Jesus and the Buddha, this transformation
entailed not debasement but exaltation. One thinks immediately of David
Strauss’ Das Leben Jesu (1835), Eugène Burnouf’s Introduction à
l’histoire du Buddhisme indien (1844), and Hermann Oldenberg’s Buddha:
Sein Leben, seine Lehre, seine Gemeinde (1881). Over the course of the
nineteenth century, the European portrayal of Buddhism underwent a
profound metamorphosis: from a form of idolatry practiced by pagans, to a
religion, and a world religion, finally to something beyond the
category of religion. Today, scholars of Buddhism are often asked: Is
Buddhism a religion, a philosophy, or a way of life? Such a question is
impossible without the work of disciples of a different Awakenment with awareness,
who believed that the founder could somehow be separated from the faith.


35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,

Untdekking fan Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

fjouwer faktoaren foar streamynfier

Dizze, bhikkhus, binne de fjouwer faktoaren foar streamynfier. Hokker fjouwer? Feriening mei goede manlju, de juste Dhamma hearre, passende refleksje en praktyk yn oerienstimming mei de Dhamma. Dizze, bhikkhus, binne de fjouwer faktoaren foar streamynfier.

36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,

Descubrimento dun Despertado con Universo de Conciencia (DAOAU)

catro factores para a entrada de fluxo

Estes, bhikkhus, son os catro factores para a entrada de fluxo. Cales catro? Asociación con homes bos, escoitando o Dhamma correcto, reflexión e práctica axeitadas de acordo co Dhamma. Estes, bhikkhus, son os catro factores para a entrada de fluxo.

37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,

გამოღვიძებული ადამიანის აღმოჩენა ცნობიერების ამაღლების სამყაროს საშუალებით (DAOAU)

ნაკადის შესვლის ოთხი ფაქტორი

ეს, bhikkhus, არის ნაკადის შესვლის ოთხი ფაქტორი. რომელი ოთხი? კარგ მამაკაცებთან ასოციაცია, სწორი დჰმას მოსმენა, შესაბამისი რეფლექსია და პრაქტიკა დჰამის შესაბამისად. ეს, bhikkhus, არის ნაკადის შესვლის ოთხი ფაქტორი.

38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,

Entdeckung des Erwachten mit dem Bewusstseinsuniversum (DAOAU)

vier Faktoren für den Stream-Eintrag

Dies, Bhikkhus, sind die vier Faktoren für den Stream-Eintrag. Welche vier? Assoziation mit guten Männern, Hören des richtigen Dhamma, angemessene Reflexion und Übung in Übereinstimmung mit dem Dhamma. Dies, Bhikkhus, sind die vier Faktoren für den Stream-Eintrag.

39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,

Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

τέσσερις παράγοντες για την είσοδο σε ροή

Αυτοί, οι bhikkhus, είναι οι τέσσερις παράγοντες για την είσοδο σε ροή. Ποια τέσσερα; Συνδέεται με καλούς άντρες, ακούει το σωστό Dhamma, κατάλληλη σκέψη και πρακτική σύμφωνα με το Dhamma. Αυτοί, οι bhikkhus, είναι οι τέσσερις παράγοντες για την είσοδο σε ροή.


40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,

જાગૃત બ્રહ્માંડ (ડીએઓએયુ) સાથે જાગૃત એકની શોધ

પ્રવાહ-પ્રવેશ માટેના ચાર પરિબળો

આ, ભીખા, પ્રવાહ-પ્રવેશ માટેના ચાર પરિબળો છે. કયા ચાર? સારા માણસો સાથે સંગત, યોગ્ય ધમ્મ સાંભળી, ધમ્મ અનુસાર યોગ્ય પ્રતિબિંબ અને અભ્યાસ. આ, ભીખા, પ્રવાહ-પ્રવેશ માટેના ચાર પરિબળો છે.



41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,

Dekouvèt nan yon sèl leve ak Linivè Konsyantizasyon (DAOAU)

kat faktè pou kouran-antre

Sa yo, bhikkhus, se kat faktè pou antre kouran. Ki kat? Asosyasyon ak bon gason, tande Dhamma ki kòrèk la, refleksyon ki apwopriye ak pratik an akò avèk Dhamma la. Sa yo, bhikkhus, se kat faktè pou antre kouran.


42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,

Gano wanda ya farka tare da wayewar kai (DAOAU)

abubuwa hudu don shigar da ruwa

Waɗannan, bhikkhus, su ne dalilai huɗu don shigarwar rafi. Wadanne hud’u? Associationulla tare da maza masu kyau, jin cikakken Dhamma, tunani mai dacewa da aiki daidai da Dhamma. Waɗannan, bhikkhus, su ne dalilai huɗu don shigarwar rafi.


43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,

Kaʻike o kahi i ala aʻe me ka Universe Universe (DAOAU)

ʻehā kumu no ke komo kahawai

ʻO kēia, ʻo bhikkhus, nā kumu ʻehā no ke komo ʻana i kahawai. ʻO nā hā? ʻO ka hui me nā kāne maikaʻi, e hoʻolohe ana i ka Dhamma pololei, ka noʻonoʻo kūpono a me ka hana e like me ka Dhamma. ʻO kēia, ʻo bhikkhus, nā kumu ʻehā no ke komo ʻana i kahawai.


44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית

תגלית של יקום עם יקום מודעות (DAOAU)

ארבעה גורמים להזנת זרם

אלה, bhikkhus, הם ארבעת הגורמים לכניסה לזרם. איזה ארבעה? התאגדות עם גברים טובים, שמיעת הדאמה הנכונה, השתקפות מתאימה ותרגול בהתאם לדאמה. אלה, bhikkhus, הם ארבעת הגורמים לכניסה לזרם.

45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,Kev Tshawb Nrhiav Tsa Tawm nrog Ib Qho Kev Paub Txog Lub Ntiaj Teb (DAOAU)

plaub yam rau kev nkag-nkag

Cov no, bhikkhus, yog plaub yam tseem ceeb rau kev nkag mus nkag. Plaub twg? Koom tes nrog cov txiv neej zoo, hnov qhov tseeb Txoj Cai, ua kom pom tseeb thiab xyaum ua raws li Txoj Cai. Cov no, bhikkhus, yog plaub yam tseem ceeb rau kev nkag mus nkag.


46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

Az ébredt tudatosságú univerzum felfedezése (DAOAU)

négy tényező az adatfolyam-belépéshez

Ez, a bhikkhus a négy tényező az áramlásba való belépéshez. Melyik négy? Egyesülés jó emberekkel, a helyes Dhamma meghallgatása, megfelelő elmélkedés és gyakorlat a Dhamma szerint. Ez, a bhikkhus a négy tényező az áramlásba való belépéshez.


47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,

Uppgötvun vakna með vitundarheima (DAOAU)

fjóra þætti fyrir strauminnkomu

Þetta, bhikkhus, eru fjórir þættir fyrir innstreymi. Hvaða fjórir? Félag við góða menn, heyra rétta Dhamma, viðeigandi speglun og æfingu í samræmi við Dhamma. Þetta, bhikkhus, eru fjórir þættir fyrir innstreymi.


48) Classical Igbo,Klassískt Igbo,

Nchọpụta nke Onye tetara na mbara igwe (DAOAU)

ihe anọ maka iyi-ntinye

Ndị a, bhikkhus, bụ ihe anọ maka ntinye iyi. Kedu nke anọ? Mkpakọrịta na ezi ndị nwoke, na-anụ Dhamma ziri ezi, ntụgharị uche kwesịrị ekwesị na omume dịka Dhamma. Ndị a, bhikkhus, bụ ihe anọ maka ntinye iyi.


49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

empat faktor untuk masuk-arus

Ini, para bhikkhu, adalah empat faktor untuk memasuki-arus. Empat yang mana? Pergaulan dengan orang-orang baik, mendengarkan Dhamma yang benar, refleksi dan praktik yang sesuai sesuai dengan Dhamma. Ini, para bhikkhu, adalah empat faktor untuk memasuki-arus.


50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,

Fionnachtana ar Dhúiseacht le Cruinne Feasachta (DAOAU)

ceithre fhachtóir maidir le hiontráil srutha

Is iad seo, bhikkhus, na ceithre fhachtóir le haghaidh iontrála srutha. Cé na ceithre? Comhlachas le fir mhaithe, an Dhamma ceart a chloisteáil, machnamh agus cleachtas cuí de réir an Dhamma. Is iad seo, bhikkhus, na ceithre fhachtóir le haghaidh iontrála srutha.


51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,

Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

quattro fattori per l’ingresso nel flusso

Questi, bhikkhu, sono i quattro fattori per l’ingresso nella corrente. Quali quattro? Associazione con uomini buoni, ascolto del Dhamma corretto, riflessione e pratica appropriate secondo il Dhamma. Questi, bhikkhu, sono i quattro fattori per l’ingresso nella corrente.





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53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,

Discovery of Awakened One with Awcious Universe (DAOAU)

patang faktor kanggo stream-entry

Iki, bhikkhus, minangka papat faktor mlebu stream. Papat sing endi? Asosiasi karo pria sing apik, ngrungokake Dhamma sing bener, refleksi lan praktik sing cocog miturut Dhamma. Iki, bhikkhus, minangka papat faktor kanggo mlebu stream.


54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,

ಜಾಗೃತಿ ಯೂನಿವರ್ಸ್ (DAOAU) ನೊಂದಿಗೆ ಜಾಗೃತಗೊಂಡವರ ಅನ್ವೇಷಣೆ

ಸ್ಟ್ರೀಮ್-ಪ್ರವೇಶಕ್ಕಾಗಿ ನಾಲ್ಕು ಅಂಶಗಳು

ಇವು, ಭಿಕ್ಷುಗಳು, ಸ್ಟ್ರೀಮ್-ಪ್ರವೇಶಕ್ಕೆ ನಾಲ್ಕು ಅಂಶಗಳಾಗಿವೆ. ಯಾವ ನಾಲ್ಕು? ಒಳ್ಳೆಯ ಪುರುಷರೊಂದಿಗೆ ಒಡನಾಟ, ಸರಿಯಾದ ಧಮ್ಮವನ್ನು ಕೇಳುವುದು, ಧಮ್ಮಕ್ಕೆ ಅನುಗುಣವಾಗಿ ಸೂಕ್ತವಾದ ಪ್ರತಿಬಿಂಬ ಮತ್ತು ಅಭ್ಯಾಸ. ಇವು, ಭಿಕ್ಷುಗಳು, ಸ್ಟ್ರೀಮ್-ಪ್ರವೇಶಕ್ಕೆ ನಾಲ್ಕು ಅಂಶಗಳಾಗಿವೆ.


55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

Оянғанның хабардар әлеммен ашылуы (DAOAU)

ағынға енудің төрт факторы

Бұлар, bhikkhus, ағынға кірудің төрт факторы. Қандай төртеу? Жақсы ер адамдармен қауымдастық, дұрыс Дамманы есту, Даммаға сәйкес тиісті рефлексия және практика. Бұлар, bhikkhus, ағынға кірудің төрт факторы.

56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,

របកគំហើញនៃការភ្ញាក់ដឹងខ្លួនជាមួយសកលការយល់ដឹង (DAOAU)

កត្តាបួនសម្រាប់ការហូរចូល

ទាំងនេះជាកត្តា ៤ យ៉ាងសម្រាប់ការហូរចូល។ មួយណា? សេពគប់ជាមួយបុរសល្អ hearing ធម៌ត្រឹមត្រូវការត្រិះរិះពិចារណានិងការប្រតិបត្តិសមស្របតាមធម៌។ ទាំងនេះជាកត្តា ៤ យ៉ាងសម្រាប់ការហូរចូល។

57) Classical Kinyarwanda,
Ivumburwa Ryakangutse hamwe no Kumenya Isanzure (DAOAU)

ibintu bine byo gutembera-kwinjira

Ibi, bhikkhus, nibintu bine byinjira-byinjira. Nibihe bine? Kwishyira hamwe nabagabo beza, kumva Dhamma ikwiye, gutekereza neza no kwitoza ukurikije Dhamma. Ibi, bhikkhus, nibintu bine byinjira-byinjira.




58) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,
Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU) 발견

스트림 진입을위한 4 가지 요소

이러한 비구는 스트림 진입을위한 네 가지 요소입니다. 어느 4 개? 선한 사람과의 교제, 올바른 법을 듣고 법에 따라 적절한 성찰과 실천. 이러한 비구는 스트림 진입을위한 네 가지 요소입니다.


59) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),
Vedîtina Yekê akiyarbûyî Bi Gerdeya Hişyarbûnê (DAOAU)

çar faktor ji bo çûn-hatinê

Ev, bhikkhus, çar faktorên ji bo ketinê-çûnûhatinê ne. Kîjan çar? Komeleya bi merivên baş re, bihîstina Dhamma rast, raman û guncandina rahijmend û li gorî Dhamma. Van, bhikkhus, ji bo ketina herikînê çar faktor in.
60) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,

Ойгонгон Ааламдын Ачуусун Ачуу (DAOAU)

агымга кирүү үчүн төрт фактор

Булар, бхикхулар, агымга кирүүнүн төрт фактору. Кайсы төртөө? Жакшы эркектер менен биригүү, туура Дамманы угуу, Даммага ылайык ой жүгүртүү жана практика. Булар, bhikkhus, агымга кирүүнүн төрт фактору.


61) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
ການຄົ້ນພົບຂອງ Awakened One ກັບຈັກກະວານປູກຈິດ ສຳ ນຶກ (DAOAU)

ສິ່ງເຫຼົ່ານີ້, ທັງສີ່ຢ່າງ, ເປັນປັດໃຈສີ່ ສຳ ລັບການເຂົ້າ - ອອກຂອງກະແສ.

ເຊິ່ງສີ່?

ສະມາຄົມກັບຜູ້ຊາຍທີ່ດີ,
ໄດ້ຍິນທັມມະທີ່ຖືກຕ້ອງ,
ການສະທ້ອນທີ່ ເໝາະ ສົມ
ແລະ
ປະຕິບັດຕາມທັມມະ.

ສິ່ງເຫຼົ່ານີ້, ທັງສີ່ຢ່າງ, ເປັນປັດໃຈສີ່ ສຳ ລັບການເຂົ້າ - ອອກຂອງກະແສ.


62) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,
Inventio autem suscitavit Awareness in Universo (DAOAU)

Haec bhikkhus sunt quatuor factores rigui ingressu.

Quattuor;

Consociatione cum bonis,
auditu rectam Dhamma,
oportet reflexionem
et
exercere, ad normam Dhamma.

Haec bhikkhus sunt quatuor factores rigui ingressu.


63) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,
Atmodinātā ar apzināšanās Visumu atklāšana (DAOAU)

Šie, bhikkhus, ir četri faktori plūsmas iekļūšanai.

Kurus četrus?

Asociācija ar labiem vīriešiem,
dzirdot pareizo Dhammu,
atbilstoša pārdomas
un
praktizē saskaņā ar Dhammu.

Šie, bhikkhus, ir četri faktori plūsmas iekļūšanai.


64) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,
Pažadinto žmogaus su sąmoningumo visata atradimas (DAOAU)

Tai, bhikkhus, yra keturi srauto patekimo veiksniai.

Kurie keturi?

Asociacija su gerais vyrais,
girdėdamas teisingą Dhammą,
tinkamas apmąstymas
ir
praktikuotis pagal Dhammą.

Tai, bhikkhus, yra keturi srauto patekimo veiksniai.


65) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,
Entdeckung vum Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

Dëst, bhikkhus, sinn déi véier Faktore fir Stream-Entry.

Wéi eng véier?

Associatioun mat gudde Männer,
déi richteg Dhamma ze héieren,
passend Reflexioun
an
üben am Aklang mat der Dhamma.

Dëst, bhikkhus, sinn déi véier Faktore fir Stream-Entry.





Friends

This is a new dhamma songs song
Jina Piya Thera
47 subscribers
The Buddhist #Devotional and #Motivational #Religious practice.


66) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
Откривање на разбудениот со универзумот за свесност (DAOAU)

Овие, бихкус, се четирите фактори за влез во потокот.

Кои четири?

Асоцијација со добри мажи,
слушајќи ја точната Дама,
соодветна рефлексија
и
вежба во согласност со Дамата.

Овие, бихкус, се четирите фактори за влез во потокот.


67) Classical Malagasy,класичен малгашки,
Fahafantarana ny iray nofohazina niaraka tamin’izao tontolo izao fanentanana (DAOAU)

Ireo, bhikkhus, no antony efatra tokony hidiran’ny stream.

Efatra inona?

Fiaraha-miasa amin’ny lehilahy tsara,
mihaino an’i Dhamma marina,
taratra mety
ary
fanazaran-tena mifanaraka amin’ny Dhamma.

Ireo, bhikkhus, no antony efatra tokony hidiran’ny stream.


68) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,
Penemuan Awakened One dengan Kesadaran Alam Semesta (DAOAU)

Ini, para bhikkhu, adalah empat faktor untuk memasuki aliran.

Empat yang mana?

Bergaul dengan lelaki baik,
mendengar Dhamma yang betul,
refleksi yang sesuai
dan
berlatih sesuai dengan Dhamma.

Ini, para bhikkhu, adalah empat faktor untuk memasuki aliran.


69) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,
ബോധവൽക്കരണ പ്രപഞ്ചവുമായി ഉണർന്നിരിക്കുന്നവന്റെ കണ്ടെത്തൽ (DAOAU)

ഇവ, ഭിക്ഷുമാർ, സ്ട്രീം പ്രവേശനത്തിനുള്ള നാല് ഘടകങ്ങളാണ്.

ഏത് നാല്?

നല്ല മനുഷ്യരുമായുള്ള സഹവാസം,
ശരിയായ ധർമ്മം കേൾക്കുന്നു,
ഉചിതമായ പ്രതിഫലനം
ഒപ്പം
ധർമ്മത്തിന് അനുസൃതമായി പരിശീലിക്കുക.

ഇവ, ഭിക്ഷുമാർ, സ്ട്രീം പ്രവേശനത്തിനുള്ള നാല് ഘടകങ്ങളാണ്.


70) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,

Skoperta ta ‘Wieħed Qajjem b’Univers ta’ Għarfien (DAOAU)

Dawn, bhikkhus, huma l-erba ‘fatturi għad-dħul fluss.

Liema erbgħa?

Assoċjazzjoni ma ‘rġiel tajbin,
smajt id-Dhamma t-tajba,
riflessjoni xierqa
u
prattika skond id-Dhamma.

Dawn, bhikkhus, huma l-erba ‘fatturi għad-dħul fluss.


71) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
Te Discovery of Awakened One with Awiling Universe (DAOAU)

Ko enei, ko nga bhikkhus, nga take e wha mo te urunga-a-awa.

E wha?

Te whakahoahoa me nga taangata pai,
te whakarongo ki te Dhamma tika,
whakaata tika
me
mahi kia rite ki te Dhamma.

Ko enei, ko nga bhikkhus, nga take e wha mo te urunga-a-awa.


72) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,
जागृत विश्वासह जागृत व्यक्तीचा शोध (डीएओएयू)

प्रवाह, प्रवेशासाठी हे चार घटक आहेत.

कोणते चार?

चांगल्या माणसांची संगती,
योग्य धम्म ऐकून,
योग्य प्रतिबिंब
आणि
धम्मानुसार सराव करा.

प्रवाह, प्रवेशासाठी हे चार घटक आहेत.


73) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,
Орчлон ертөнцийг танин мэдсэн сэрсэн хүнийг нээх нь (DAOAU)

Эдгээр нь, хуврагууд, урсгалд нэвтрэх дөрвөн хүчин зүйл юм.

Аль дөрөв вэ?

Сайн эрчүүдтэй холбоо тогтоох,
зөв Дамма сонсох,
зохих тусгал
болон
Даммын дагуу дасгал хий.

Эдгээр нь, хуврагууд, урсгалд нэвтрэх дөрвөн хүчин зүйл юм.


74) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

နိုးကြားသောသူအားသတိရှိရှိစကြ ၀ withာဖြင့်ရှာဖွေတွေ့ရှိခြင်း (DAOAU)

ရဟန်းတို့ဤသည်ကားစီးဝင်ခြင်း၏အကြောင်းလေးမျိုးတည်း။

ဘယ်လေးယောက်လဲ။

လူကောင်းတွေနဲ့ပေါင်းသင်းတာ၊
မှန်ကန်သောတရားကိုကြားနာခြင်း၊
သင့်လျော်သောရောင်ပြန်ဟပ်မှု
နှင့်
တရားနှင့်အညီကျင့်ကြံပါ။

ရဟန်းတို့ဤသည်ကားစီးဝင်ခြင်း၏အကြောင်းလေးမျိုးတည်း။


75) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा)
,जागरूकता यूनिवर्स (DAOAU) को साथ जागृत एकको आविष्कार

यी, भिख्खस, स्ट्रिम-प्रवेशका लागि चार कारकहरू हुन्।

कुन चार?

राम्रो मान्छे संग संगति,
सही धम्मा सुन्न,
उचित प्रतिबिम्ब

धम्मा अनुसार अभ्यास गर्नुहोस्।

यी, भिख्खस, स्ट्रिम-प्रवेशका लागि चार कारकहरू हुन्।


76) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,
Discovery of Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

Disse, bhikkhus, er de fire faktorene for strøminngang.

Hvilke fire?

Forening med gode menn,
høre riktig Dhamma,
passende refleksjon
og
øve i samsvar med Dhamma.

Disse, bhikkhus, er de fire faktorene for strøminngang.

77) Classical Odia (Oriya),
ସଚେତନତା ବ୍ରହ୍ମାଣ୍ଡ ସହିତ ଜାଗ୍ରତ ହୋଇଥିବା ଆବିଷ୍କାର (DAOAU)

ଏଗୁଡ଼ିକ, ଭିକ୍କସ୍, ଷ୍ଟ୍ରିମ୍-ଏଣ୍ଟ୍ରି ପାଇଁ ଚାରୋଟି କାରଣ |

କେଉଁ ଚାରିଟି?

ଭଲ ପୁରୁଷମାନଙ୍କ ସହିତ ଆସୋସିଏସନ,
ସଠିକ୍ ଧାମ ଶୁଣିବା,
ଉପଯୁକ୍ତ ପ୍ରତିଫଳନ |
ଏବଂ
ଧାମ ଅନୁଯାୟୀ ଅଭ୍ୟାସ କର |

ଏଗୁଡ଼ିକ, ଭିକ୍କସ୍, ଷ୍ଟ୍ରିମ୍-ଏଣ୍ଟ୍ରି ପାଇଁ ଚାରୋଟି କାରଣ |



Friends


Dharma with Music: Breathing In Breathing Out
DharmaRealmLive
6.11K subscribers
Rev. Heng Sure performs “Breathing in, Breathing out” at Teance Tea shop during June’s gathering of “Tea and Dharma.”
This song was inspired by the method of Sundarananda from the chapter on the twenty-five sages in the Surangama sutra. Sundarananda realized awakening with the method of focusing on his breath in meditation. Buddha gave him this practice in order to harness his wandering mind. With it, Sundarananda was able to fine-tune his focus and concentration to point of realizing awakening.
Breathing In, Breathing Out: Sundarananda’s Song
by Rev. Heng Sure
Sundarananda tried to meditate
But he couldn’t get it straight,
So he asked the World Honored One
To teach him how to concentrate.
Breathing in, breathing out
Outside in, inside out,
Buddha’s mind, big and bright,
Watch your breath, and fill with light.
My mind was scattered, too many outflows,
The Buddha pointed to the tip of my nose
Focus on the whiteness, patiently,
Observe your breath how it comes and goes.
Breathing in, breathing out
Outside in, inside out,
Buddha’s mind, big and bright,
Watch your breath, and fill with light.
Watch your breath, you will find,
At first like smoke, then it refines,
The breath turns white, then an inner light,
Lights the world, from your body and mind.
Breathing in, breathing out
Outside in, inside out,
Buddha’s mind, big and bright,
Watch your breath, and fill with light.
Dharma with Music: Breathing In Breathing Out
Rev. Heng Sure performs “Breathing in, Breathing out” at Teance T


78) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو
د پوهاوي کائنات (DAOAU) سره د ویښ شوي یوه کشف

دا ، بهخوس ، د جریان د ننوتلو څلور عوامل دي.

کوم څلور؟

د ښه سړو سره انجمن ،
سم دامت په اوریدو ،
مناسب انعکاس
او
د ډهما مطابق عمل وکړئ.

دا ، بهخوس ، د جریان د ننوتلو څلور عوامل دي.



79) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
کشف یک فرد بیدار با جهان آگاهی (DAOAU)

اینها ، bhikkhus ، چهار عامل ورود جریان هستند.

کدام چهار؟

ارتباط با مردان خوب ،
شنیدن ضامعه صحیح ،
انعکاس مناسب
و
مطابق با ضرما تمرین کنید.

اینها ، bhikkhus ، چهار عامل ورود جریان هستند.



80) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,
Odkrycie Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

To są cztery czynniki wejścia w strumień, mnisi.

Które cztery?

Stowarzyszenie z dobrymi ludźmi,
słuchanie prawidłowej Dhammy,
odpowiednia refleksja
i
praktykuj zgodnie z Dhammą.

To są cztery czynniki wejścia w strumień, mnisi.


81) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
Descoberta do Awakened One with Awareness Universe (DAOAU)

Esses, bhikkhus, são os quatro fatores para a entrada na corrente.

Quais quatro?

Associação com bons homens,
ouvir o Dhamma correto,
reflexão apropriada
e
pratique de acordo com o Dhamma.

Esses, bhikkhus, são os quatro fatores para a entrada na corrente.


82) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,

ਜਾਗਰੂਕਤਾ ਬ੍ਰਹਿਮੰਡ (ਡੀ.ਏ.ਓ.ਏ.ਯੂ.) ਨਾਲ ਜਾਗਰੂਕ ਕੀਤੇ ਵਿਅਕਤੀ ਦੀ ਖੋਜ

ਇਹ, ਭੀਖੁਸ, ਧਾਰਾ-ਪ੍ਰਵੇਸ਼ ਦੇ ਚਾਰ ਕਾਰਕ ਹਨ.

ਕਿਹੜਾ ਚਾਰ?

ਚੰਗੇ ਬੰਦਿਆਂ ਨਾਲ ਸੰਗਤ,
ਸਹੀ ਧਾਮ ਸੁਣਦਿਆਂ,
ਉਚਿਤ ਪ੍ਰਤੀਬਿੰਬ
ਅਤੇ
ਧਮ ਦੇ ਅਨੁਸਾਰ ਅਭਿਆਸ ਕਰੋ.

ਇਹ, ਭੀਖੁਸ, ਧਾਰਾ-ਪ੍ਰਵੇਸ਼ ਦੇ ਚਾਰ ਕਾਰਕ ਹਨ.


83) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,

Descoperirea celui trezit cu universul conștientizării (DAOAU)

Aceștia, bhikkhus, sunt cei patru factori pentru intrarea în flux.

Care patru?

Asociere cu oameni buni,
auzind Dhamma corectă,
reflecție adecvată
și
practică în conformitate cu Dhamma.

Aceștia, bhikkhus, sunt cei patru factori pentru intrarea în flux.


84) Classical Russian-Классический русский,
Открытие Пробужденного со Вселенной Осознания (DAOAU)

Это, бхикшу, четыре фактора для вхождения в поток.

Какие четыре?

Общение с хорошими людьми,
слыша правильную Дхамму,
соответствующее отражение
а также
практикуйте в соответствии с Дхаммой.

Это, бхикшу, четыре фактора для вхождения в поток.


ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པདྨེ་ཧཱུྃ། OM MANI PADME HUM - Karmapa
Melodious Dharma Sound
7.23K subscribers
ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པདྨེ་ཧཱུྃ☆♡OM MANI PADME HUM♡☆
…………………
The first syllable, OM, is not a word but an evocation of spiritual power and the presence of the absolute. It is known throughout Asia in several religions, especially Hinduism.
The word Mani means “jewel” or “bead.”
Padme is the lotus flower
Hum represents the spirit of enlightenment
For Tibetan Buddhists, “jewel in the lotus” represents bodhicitta and the wish for liberation from the Six Realms. Each of the six syllables in the mantra is thought to be directed at liberation from a different samsaric realm of suffering.
The mantra is most often recited, but devotional practice may also involve reading the words, or writing them repeatedly.
Tibetan mantra Om Mani Padme Hum Recited By His Holiness 17th Gyalwa Karmapa Trinlay Thaye Dorje 🙏🙏🙏
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ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པདྨེ་ཧཱུྃ

Bodhi leaf

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