Discovery of Metteyya the Awakened One with Awareness Universe(FOAINDMAOAU)
From Kushinara Nibbana Bhumi Pagoda in
 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES in BUDDHA'S own Words through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgat White Home 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL 3rd Stage, Punya Bhumi Bengaluru- Magadhi Karnataka State -PRABUDDHA BHARAT
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10/14/20
LESSON 3474 Wed 14 Oct 2020 Based on the information Dear sir This information is enough to take one day Distinguish webinar talk. Thank you so much and If possible I will try to start Vipassana center in University from Respected Dr Satishbabu Thank You for your efforts. I am sending you Buddha’s own words on Meditation. This will help you start the right course on Meditation. I wish you all success. This message will be forwarded to all the Monks and Upasakas. It will be better for Practicing Monks to speak on Meditation. Buddha was asked, “What have you gained by Meditation?” He replied “Nothing! “However, Buddha said, let me tell you what I lost: Anger, Anxiety, Depression, Insecurity, Fear of Old Age and Death” https://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/digha/dn22.html Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta — Attendance on awareness — [ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka
Posted by: site admin @ 1:10 am


LESSON 3474 Wed 14 Oct  2020
Based on the information
Dear sir
This information is enough to take one day Distinguish webinar talk.
Thank you so much and If possible I will try to start Vipassana center in University from
Respected Dr Satishbabu

Thank You for your efforts. I am sending you Buddha’s own words on Meditation. This will help you start the right course on Meditation. I wish you all success. This message will be forwarded to all the Monks and Upasakas. It will be better for Practicing Monks to speak on Meditation.    

Buddha was asked, “What have you gained by Meditation?”
He replied “Nothing!
                                                                                                        “However, Buddha said, let me tell you what I lost:
Anger,

Anxiety,

Depression,

Insecurity,

Fear of Old Age and Death”

https://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/digha/dn22.html

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a fundamental reference for meditation practice.

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas
   E. Section on the Truths
      E1. Exposition of Dukkhasacca
      E2. Exposition of Samudayasacca
      E3. Exposition of Nirodhasacca
      E4. Exposition of Maggasacca


Introduction


Thus have I heard:

On one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma, a market town of the Kurus. There, he addressed the bhikkhus:


– Bhikkhus.

– Bhaddante answered the bhikkhus. The Bhagavā said:


This, bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification
of beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance
of dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas.


Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna


And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the root of a tree
or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the legs crosswise,
setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ.
Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’;
he
trains himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.


Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a
long turn, understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn,
he understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’;
he
trains himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

B. Section on postures


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am
walking’, or while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while
sitting he understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he
understands: ‘I am lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he understands it accordingly. 

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

C. Section on sampajañña


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing,
acts with sampajañña, while looking ahead and while looking around, he
acts with sampajañña, while bending and while stretching, he acts with
sampajañña, while wearing the robes and the upper robe and while
carrying the bowl, he acts with sampajañña, while eating, while
drinking, while chewing, while tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while
attending to the business of defecating and urinating, he acts with
sampajañña, while walking, while standing, while sitting, while
sleeping, while being awake, while talking and while being silent, he
acts with sampajañña.

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.


D. Section on Repulsiveness


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the
soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is
delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya,
there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin,
flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura,
spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces,
bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal
mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”

Just as if, bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled
with various kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans,
cow-peas, sesame seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having
unfastened it, would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this
is paddy, those are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame
seeds and this is husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
considers this very body, from the soles of the feet up and from the
hair on the head down, which is delimited by its skin and full of
various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya,
there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin,
flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura,
spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces,
bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal
mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

E. Section on the Elements
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed as consisting of elements: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element and the air element.”


Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a butcher’s apprentice, having
killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads cutting it into pieces; in the
same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element and the air element.” 

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three
days dead, swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(2)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by
hawks, being eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by
dogs, being eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by
various kinds of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(3)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton with flesh and blood, held
together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(4)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton without flesh and smeared
with blood, held together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in

(6)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and
there, here a hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a
shin bone, here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back
bone, here a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a
tooth bone, or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

(7)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened like a seashell, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(8)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, heaped up bones over a year old, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(9)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, rotten bones reduced to powder, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

II. Observation of Vedanā


And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing vedanā in vedanā?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, experiencing a sukha vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā“; experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa“.


Thus he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā externally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in vedanā; or else, [realizing:] “this is vedanā!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing vedanā in vedanā.


III. Observation of Citta


And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing citta in citta?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu understands citta with rāga as “citta with rāga“, or he understands citta without rāga as “citta without rāga“, or he understands citta with dosa as “citta with dosa“, or he understands citta without dosa as “citta without dosa“, or he understands citta with moha as “citta with moha“, or he understands citta without moha as “citta without moha“, or he understands a collected citta as “a collected citta“, or he understands a scattered citta as “a scattered citta“, or he understands an expanded citta as “an expanded citta“, or he understands an unexpanded citta as “an unexpanded citta“, or he understands a surpassable citta as “a surpassable citta“, or he understands an unsurpassable citta as “an unsurpassable citta“, or he understands a settled citta as “a settled citta“, or he understands an unsettled citta as “an unsettled citta“, or he understands a liberated citta as “a liberated citta“, or he understands an unliberated citta as “an unliberated citta“.


Thus he dwells observing citta in citta internally, or he dwells observing citta in citta externally, or he dwells observing citta in citta internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in citta, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in citta, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in citta; or else, [realizing:] “this is citta!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing citta in citta.

IV. Observation of Dhammas

A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas


And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the five nīvaraṇas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the five nīvaraṇas?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being kāmacchanda present within, understands: “there is kāmacchanda within me”; there not being kāmacchanda present within, he understands: “there is no kāmacchanda within me”; he understands how the unarisen kāmacchanda comes to arise; he understands how the arisen kāmacchanda is abandoned; and he understands how the abandoned kāmacchanda does not come to arise in the future.


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being byāpāda present within, understands: “there is byāpāda within me”; there not being byāpāda present within, he understands: “there is no byāpāda within me”; he understands how the unarisen byāpāda comes to arise; he understands how the arisen byāpāda is abandoned; and he understands how the abandoned byāpāda does not come to arise in the future.


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being thīnamiddhā present within, understands: “there is thīnamiddhā within me”; there not being thīnamiddhā present within, he understands: “there is no thīnamiddhā within me”; he understands how the unarisen thīnamiddhā comes to arise; he understands how the arisen thīnamiddhā is abandoned; and he understands how the abandoned thīnamiddhā does not come to arise in the future.


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being uddhacca-kukkucca present within, understands: “there is uddhacca-kukkucca within me”; there not being uddhacca-kukkucca present within, he understands: “there is no uddhacca-kukkucca within me”; he understands how the unarisen uddhacca-kukkucca comes to arise; he understands how the arisen uddhacca-kukkucca is abandoned; and he understands how the abandoned uddhacca-kukkucca does not come to arise in the future.


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being vicikicchā present within, understands: “there is vicikicchā within me”; there not being vicikicchā present within, he understands: “there is no vicikicchā within me”; he understands how the unarisen vicikicchā comes to arise; he understands how the arisen vicikicchā is abandoned; and he understands how the abandoned vicikicchā does not come to arise in the future.


Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the five nīvaraṇas.

B. Section on the Khandhas


And furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the five khandhas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the five khandhas?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu [discerns]: “such is rūpa, such is the samudaya of rūpa, such is the passing away of rūpa; such is vedanā, such is the samudaya of vedanā, such is the passing away of vedanā; such is saññā, such is the samudaya of saññā, such is the passing away of saññā; such is saṅkhāra, such is the samudaya of saṅkhāra, such is the passing away of saṅkhāra; such is viññāṇa, such is the samudaya of viññāṇa, such is the passing away of viññāṇa“.


Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the five khandhas.

C. Section on the Sense Spheres


And furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu understands cakkhu, he understands rūpa, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


He understands sota, he understands sadda, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


He understands ghāna, he understands gandha, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


He understands jivha, he understands rasa, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


He understands kāya, he understands phoṭṭhabba, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


He understands mana, he understands dhammas, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.


Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas.

D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas


And furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the seven bojjhaṅgas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the seven bojjhaṅgas?


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, there being the sati sambojjhaṅga present within, understands: “there is the sati sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the sati sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no sati sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen sati sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen sati sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen dhammavicaya sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the vīriya sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the vīriya sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the vīriya sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no vīriya sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen vīriya sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen vīriya sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the pīti sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the pīti sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the pīti sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no pīti sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen pīti sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen pīti sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the passaddhi sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the passaddhi sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the passaddhi sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no passaddhi sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen passaddhi sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen passaddhi sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the samādhi sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the samādhi sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the samādhi sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no samādhi sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen samādhi sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen samādhi sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


There being the upekkhā sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is the upekkhā sambojjhaṅga within me”; there not being the upekkhā sambojjhaṅga present within, he understands: “there is no upekkhā sambojjhaṅga within me”; he understands how the unarisen upekkhā sambojjhaṅga comes to arise; he understands how the arisen upekkhā sambojjhaṅga is developed to perfection.


Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the seven bojjhaṅgas.

E. Section on the Truths


And furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the four ariya·saccas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the four ariya·saccas?

E1. Exposition of Dukkhasacca


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha ariyasacca? Jāti is dukkha, aging is dukkha (sickness is dukkha) maraṇa is dukkha, sorrow, lamentation, dukkha, domanassa and distress is dukkha, association with what is disliked is dukkha, dissociation from what is liked is dukkha, not to get what one wants is dukkha; in short, the five upādāna·k·khandhas are dukkha.


And what, bhikkhus, is jāti? For the various beings in the various classes of beings, jāti, the birth, the descent [into the womb], the arising [in the world], the appearance, the apparition of the khandhas, the acquisition of the āyatanas. This, bhikkhus, is called jāti.


And what, bhikkhus, is jarā? For the various beings in the various classes of beings, jarā,
the state of being decayed, of having broken [teeth], of having grey
hair, of being wrinkled, the decline of vitality, the decay of the indriyas: this, bhikkhus, is called jarā.


And what, bhikkhus, is maraṇa?
For the various beings in the various classes of beings, the decease,
the state of shifting [out of existence], the break up, the
disappearance, the death, maraṇa, the passing away, the break up of the khandhas, the laying down of the corpse: this, bhikkhus, is called maraṇa.


And what, bhikkhus, is sorrow? In one, bhikkhus, associated with various kinds of misfortune, touched by various kinds of dukkha dhammas, the sorrrow, the mourning, the state of grief, the inner sorrow, the inner great sorrow: this, bhikkhus, is called sorrow.


And what, bhikkhus, is lamentation? In one, bhikkhus, associated with various kinds of misfortune, touched by various kinds of dukkha dhammas,
the cries, the lamentations, the weeping, the wailing, the state of
crying, the state of lamentating: this, bhikkhus, is called lamentation.


And what, bhikkhus, is dukkha? Whatever, bhikkhus, bodily dukkha, bodily unpleasantness, dukkha engendered by bodily contact, unpleasant vedayitas: this, bhikkhus, is called dukkha.


And what, bhikkhus, is domanassa? Whatever, bhikkhus, mental dukkha, mental unpleasantness, dukkha engendered by mental contact, unpleasant vedayitas: this, bhikkhus, is called domanassa.


And what, bhikkhus, is despair? In one, bhikkhus, associated with various kinds of misfortune, touched by various kinds of dukkha dhammas, the trouble, the despair, the state of being in trouble, the state of being in despair: this, bhikkhus, is called despair.


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha
of being associated with what is disagreeable? Here, as to the forms,
sounds, tastes, odors, bodily phenomena and mental phenomena there are
which are unpleasing, not enjoyable, unpleasant, or else those who
desire one’s disadvantage, those who desire one’s loss, those who desire
one’s discomfort, those who desire one’s non-liberation from
attachment, meeting, being associated, being together, encountering
them: this, bhikkhus, is called the dukkha of being associated with what is disagreeable.


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha
of being dissociated from what is agreeable? Here, as to the forms,
sounds, tastes, odors, bodily phenomena and mental phenomena there are
which are pleasing, enjoyable, pleasant, or else those who desire one’s
advantage, those who desire one’s benefit, those who desire one’s
comfort, those who desire one’s liberation from attachment, not meeting,
not being associated, not being together, not encountering them: this,
bhikkhus, is called the dukkha of being dissociated from what is agreeable.


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha
of not getting what one wants? In beings, bhikkhus, having the
characteristic of being born, such a wish arises: “oh really, may there
not be jāti for us, and really, may we not come to jāti.” But this is not to be achieved by wishing. This is the dukkha of not getting what one wants.


In beings, bhikkhus, having the characteristic of getting old, such a wish arises: “oh really, may there not be jarā for us, and really, may we not come to jarā.” But this is not to be achieved by wishing. This is the dukkha of not getting what one wants.


In beings, bhikkhus, having the characteristic of getting sick, such a
wish arises: “oh really, may there not be sickness for us, and really,
may we not come to sickness.” But this is not to be achieved by wishing.
This is the dukkha of not getting what one wants.


In beings, bhikkhus, having the characteristic of getting old, such a wish arises: “oh really, may there not be maraṇa for us, and really, may we not come to maraṇa.” But this is not to be achieved by wishing. This is the dukkha of not getting what one wants.


In beings, bhikkhus, having the characteristic of sorrow, lamentation, dukkha, domanassa and distress, such a wish arises: “oh really, may there not be sorrow, lamentation, dukkha, domanassa and distress for us, and really, may we not come to sorrow, lamentation, dukkha, domanassa and distress.” But this is not to be achieved by wishing. This is the dukkha of not getting what one wants.


And what, bhikkhus, are in short the five upādānakkhandhas? They are: the rūpa upādānakkhandha, the vedanā upādānakkhandha, the saññā upādānakkhandha, the saṅkhāra upādānakkhandha, the viññāṇa upādānakkhandha. These are called in short, bhikkhus, the five upādānakkhandhas.


This is called, bhikkhus, the dukkha ariyasacca

E2. Exposition of Samudayasacca


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha-samudaya ariyasacca? It is this taṇhā leading to rebirth, connected with desire and enjoyment, finding delight here or there, that is to say: kāma-taṇhā, bhava-taṇhā and vibhava-taṇhā. But this taṇhā,
bhikkhus, when arising, where does it arise, and when settling
[itself], where does it settle? In that in the world which seems
pleasant and agreeable, that is where taṇhā, when arising, arises, where when settling, it settles.

And what in the world is pleasant and agreeable? The eye in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The ear in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The nose in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The tongue in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Kāya in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Mana in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

Visible forms in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Sounds in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Smells in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Tastes in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Bodily phenomena in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Dhammas in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The eye-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The ear-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The nose-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The tongue-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Kāya-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Mana-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The eye-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The ear-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The nose-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The tongue-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Kāya-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. Mana-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The vedanā born of eye-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vedanā born of ear-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vedanā born of nose-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vedanā born of tongue-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vedanā born of kāya-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vedanā born of mana-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The saññā of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The saññā of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The saññā of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The saññā of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The saññā of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The saññā of Dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles.

The intention [related to] visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā,
when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The intention
[related to] sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā,
when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The intention
[related to] odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā,
when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The intention
[related to] tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā,
when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The intention
[related to] bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable,
there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The intention [related to] dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The taṇhā for visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The taṇhā for sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The taṇhā for odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The taṇhā for tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The taṇhā for bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The taṇhā for dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The vitakka of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vitakka of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vitakka of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vitakka of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vitakka of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vitakka of dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. 

The vicāra of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vicāra of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vicāra of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vicāra of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vicāra of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. The vicāra of dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when arising, arises, there when settling, it settles. This is called, bhikkhus, the dukkha·samudaya ariyasacca.

E3. Exposition of Nirodhasacca


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha-samudaya ariyasacca? It is this taṇhā leading to rebirth, connected with desire and enjoyment, finding delight here or there, that is to say: kāma-taṇhā, bhava-taṇhā and vibhava-taṇhā. But this taṇhā,
bhikkhus, when abandoned, where is it abandoned, and when ceasing,
where does it cease? In that in the world which seems pleasant and
agreeable, that is where taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, where when ceasing, it ceases. 

And what in the world is pleasant and agreeable? The eye in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The ear in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The nose in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The tongue in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Kāya in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Mana in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

Visible forms in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Sounds in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Smells in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Tastes in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Bodily phenomena in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Dhammas in the world are pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

The eye-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The ear-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The nose-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The tongue-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Kāya-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Mana-viññāṇa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

The eye-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The ear-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The nose-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The tongue-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Kāya-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. Mana-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

The vedanā born of eye-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vedanā born of ear-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vedanā born of nose-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vedanā born of tongue-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vedanā born of kāya-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vedanā born of mana-samphassa in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

The saññā of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The saññā of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The saññā of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The saññā of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The saññā of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The saññā of Dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. 

The intention [related to] visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā,
when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The
intention [related to] sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable,
there taṇhā,
when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The
intention [related to] odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable,
there taṇhā,
when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The
intention [related to] tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable,
there taṇhā,
when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The
intention [related to] bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and
agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The intention [related to] dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases.

The taṇhā for visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The taṇhā for sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The taṇhā for odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The taṇhā for tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The taṇhā for bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The taṇhā for dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. 

The vitakka of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vitakka of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vitakka of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vitakka of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vitakka of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vitakka of dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. 

The vicāra of visible forms in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vicāra of sounds in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vicāra of odors in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vicāra of tastes in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vicāra of bodily phenomena in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. The vicāra of dhammas in the world is pleasant and agreeable, there taṇhā, when abandoned, is abandoned, there when ceasing, it ceases. This is called, bhikkhus, the dukkha·nirodha ariyasacca.

E4. Exposition of Maggasacca


And what, bhikkhus, is the dukkha·nirodha·gāminī paṭipadā ariyasacca? It is just this ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga, that is to say sammādiṭṭhi, sammāsaṅkappo, sammāvācā, sammākammanto, sammā-ājīvo, sammāvāyāmo, sammāsati and sammāsamādhi.

And what, bhikkhus, is sammādiṭṭhi? That, bhikkhus, which is the ñāṇa of dukkha, the ñāṇa of dukkha-samudaya, the ñāṇa of dukkha-nirodha and the ñāṇa of dukkha-nirodha-gāmini paṭipada, that is called, bhikkhus, sammādiṭṭhi

And what, bhikkhus, are sammāsaṅkappas? Those, bhikkhus, which are saṅkappas of nekkhamma, saṅkappas of abyāpāda, saṅkappas of avihiṃsā, those are called, bhikkhus, sammāsaṅkappas.

And what, bhikkhus, is sammāvācā? That, bhikkhus, which is abstaining from musāvādā, abstaining from pisuṇa vācā, abstaining from pharusa vācā, and abstaining from samphappalāpa, that is called, bhikkhus, sammāvācā

And what, bhikkhus, is sammā-kammanta? That, bhikkhus, which is abstaining from pāṇātipāta , abstaining from adinnādāna, abstaining from abrahmacariya, that is called, bhikkhus, sammā-kammanta

And what, bhikkhus, is sammā-ājīva?
Here, bhikkhus, a noble disciple, having abandonned wrong livelihood,
supports his life by right means of livelihood, that is called,
bhikkhus, sammā-ājīva

And what, bhikkhus, is sammāvāyāma? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu generates his chanda for the non-arising of unarisen pāpaka and akusala dhammas, he exerts himself, rouses his viriya, applies vigorously his citta and strives; he generates his chanda for the forsaking of arisen pāpaka and akusala dhammas, he exerts himself, rouses his viriya, applies vigorously his citta and strives; he generates his chanda for the arising of unarisen kusala dhammas, he exerts himself, rouses his viriya, applies vigorously his citta and strives; he generates his chanda for the steadfastness of arisen kusala dhammas,
for their absence of confusion, for their increase, their development,
their cultivation and their completion, he exerts himself, rouses his viriya, applies vigorously his citta and strives. This is called, bhikkhus, sammāvāyāma

An what, bhikkhus, is sammāsati? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. This is called, bhikkhus, sammāsati.

And what, bhikkhus, is sammāsamādhi? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, detached from kāma, detached from akusala dhammas, having
entered in the first jhāna, abides therein, with vitakka and vicāra,
with pīti and sukha born of detachment.
With
the stilling of vitakka-vicāra, having entered in the second jhāna, he
abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification of citta, without
vitakka nor vicāra, with pīti and sukha born of samādhi.
And
with indifference towards pīti, he abides in upekkha, sato and
sampajāno, he experiences in kāya the sukha which the ariyas describe:
‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this] sukha’, having
entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein.
Abandoning
sukha and abandoning dukkha, somanassa and domanassa having previously
disappeared, without sukha nor dukkha, with the purity of upekkha and
sati, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein.
This is called, bhikkhus, sammāsamādhi.

This is called, bhikkhus, the dukkha·nirodha·gāminī paṭipadā ariyasacca.

Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the four ariya·saccas.

The benefits of practicing the Satipaṭṭhānas



For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for seven years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.

Let alone seven years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for six years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone six years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for five years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone five years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for four years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone four years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for three years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.

Let alone three years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for two years, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone two years, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for one year, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone one year, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for seven months, one of two results may be expected:
either [perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some
clinging left, anāgāmita.

Let alone seven months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for six months, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone six months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for five months, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita

Let alone five months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for four months, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.

Let alone four months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for three months, one of two results may be expected:
either [perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some
clinging left, anāgāmita

Let alone three months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for two months, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.

Let alone two months, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for one month, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.

Let alone one month, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for half a month, one of two results may be expected:
either [perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some
clinging left, anāgāmita.

Let alone half a month, bhikkhus. For whoever, bhikkhus, would practice these four satipaṭṭhānas
in this way for a week, one of two results may be expected: either
[perfect] knowledge in visible phenomena, or if there is some clinging
left, anāgāmita.


“This, bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification
of beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance
of dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas.” Thus has it been said, and on the basis of all this has it been said.


Thus spoke the Bhagavā. Delighted, the bhikkhus welcomed the words of the Bhagavā.


Note

1. ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya:
this is probably the trickiest part of the sutta. It is very important
because it will be repeated over 20 times, and also because it is the
central part explaining how sati is actually made present. Here are a
few alternate renderings:

VRI: “Now his awareness is established: “This
is body!” Thus he develops his awareness to such an extent that there
is mere understanding along with mere awareness.”

Bhante Analayo: “Or else mindfulness that ‘There is a body’ is established in him to the extent of bare knowledge and remembrance of it”

Thanissaro Bhikkhu: “Or his mindfulness that ‘There is a body’ is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance”

Bhikkhu Nanamoli & Bhikkhu Bodhi: “Or
else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness.”

Nyanasatta Thera: “Or his mindfulness is
established with the thought: “The body exists,” to the extent necessary
just for knowledge and mindfulness.”

Soma Thera: “Or indeed his mindfulness is
established with the thought: ‘The body exists,’ to the extent necessary
just for knowledge and remembrance”

Maurice Walshe: “Or else, mindfulness that “there is a body” is present to him just to the extent necessary for the knowledge and awareness.”


Propagation Dhamma
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This sutta is the primary discourse in which the Buddha describes the practice of meditation in detail. This translation of the Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta has Roman-script Pāli with an English translation on slides explaining Pali terms in correspondence colour
Mahasatipatthana Sutta
This
sutta is the primary discourse in which the Buddha describes the
practice of meditation in detail. This translation of the
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta has Ro…


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